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Artists' Biographies

Biographies are in alphabetical order by last name.
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A

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Edwin Austin Abbey biography

Edwin Austin Abbey biography

Edwin Austin Abbey (1 April 1852 – 1 August 1911)
One of the greatest American illustrators of the Golden Age of Illustration of the last quarter of the 19th century. His work was praised for its design and historical accuracy and he illustrated works by Marvell, Pope, and Shakespeare. In 1902 King Edward VII appointed him official court painter of the coronation in Westminster Abbey. Amongst his many artist friends was John Singer Sargent.
Source: The Illustration Art Gallery
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E V Abbott biography

E V Abbott biography

E V Abbott (1899 - 1980; UK)
E V Abbott was a prolific illustrator of children's books and comics, including 'Tiny Tots', 'Bedtime Tales' and 'My First Book'.
Source: The Illustration Art Gallery
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Chris Achilleos biography

Chris Achilleos biography

Chris Achilleos
Born in Famagusta, Cyprus, Chris moved to England with his family in 1960. With a prolific career now spanning over 30 years, Chris is famous for his celebrated paintings for book covers, posters, films, album sleeves and video covers. His work includes covers for authors Edgar Rice Burroughs, Michael Moorcock, Robert E Howard and J R R Tolkien, and for Star Trek and Doctor Who.

He has worked for film giants George Lucas, Ron Howard and Ray Harryhausen, and produced concept designs for the films Heavy Metal and Willow. His poster work includes SuperGirl, Bladerunner and Jackie Chan's The Protector. Chris is most famous for his hard-hitting fantasy works and his unique representation of Amazonian women, many of whom are depicted in these posters!
Source: The Illustration Art Gallery
Chris Achilleos art
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Neal Adams biography

Neal Adams biography

Neal Adams (born 15 June 1941; USA)
Neal Adams was one of the innovators in comic strip art to hit American comic books in the late 1960s and 1970s, revitalizing and redefining the looks of the X-Men and Batman. Adams was also an outspoken advocate of creators rights and was central to the attempts to help Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster earn pensions from their creation of Superman and in the setting up of the Comics Creators' Guild. Adams has won the Shazam Award in 1970 and 1971, the Inkpot Award in 1976, Eagle Awards in 1977 and 1978 and has been indicted into the Will Eisner Comic Books Hall of Fame in 1998 and the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1999.

Neal Edward Adams was born on Governors Island, a 172-acre island a half mile from the southern tip of Manhattan in New York Harbor used by the US Army, on 15 June 1941. His father deserted the family when Adams was only 13 and, with college financially out of reach, he attended the School of Industrial Art, a vocational school in Manhattan.

Graduating in 1959, and turned down by DC Comics, he submitted samples to Archie Comics where Joe Simon was creating a superhero line. A sample of The Fly earned him his first professional appearance when a panel from his sample was used in Adventures of The Fly #4 (Jan 1960). Adams was soon drawing fillers for Archie's Joke Book Magazine and was recommended to Howard Nostrand, who needed an assistant on "Bat Masterson", a syndicated newspaper strip based on the TV series.

Adams gained some much needed experience on the strip and turned to advertising, working for Johnstone & Cushing for a year. The company specialised in comic strip advertising and Adams found himself working on AT&T advertising strip "Chip Martin, College Reporter" for Boys' Life and similar work for the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company.

Adams, following a recommendation by Jerry Caplin (brother of Al Capp), was asked to produce samples for a new strip to be based on the popular TV drama Ben Casey. The strip was successfully pitched and was syndicated from 26 November 1962 with a colour Sunday strip added on 20 September 1964. The TV series came to an end in March 1966 and the strip followed on 31 July 1966.

Adams attempted to return to advertising work but needed to fill in, ghosting a few weeks for Lou Fine on the syndicated hardboiled detective serial "Peter Scratch", Stan Drake's "The Heart of Juliet Jones" and was hawking around a strip of his own, "Tangent". He was offered work by Peter Scratch-creator Elliot Caplin on a proposed adaptation of Robin Moore's The Green Berets but Adams – opposed to the war – suggested Joe Kubert, who accepted the job.

Adams made his first splash in comic books drawing horror stories for Warren Publishing before exploiting the gap left by Kubert at DC Comics. After producing a handful of war and horror stories for anthologies like Our Army at War, Adams found himself working on The Adventures of Jerry Lewis and The Adventures of Bob Hope.

After producing a few covers featuring Superman and Batman for Action Comics, Lois Lane and The Brave and the Bold, Adams produced his first team-up story, "The Superman-Batman Revenge Squads" for World's Finest Comics in 1968. However, it was with the supernatural hero Deadman that Adams found his first real success. He took over the artwork with Strange Adventures #206 and illustrated the stories and covers for eleven issues, also taking over the scriptwriting with issue 212. Adams also briefly drew (and even more briefly wrote) The Spectre in 1968.

Adams was assigned numerous covers at DC and, in 1969, also began working for Marvel Comics, pencilling several issues of X-Men, then under threat of cancellation. He, along with writer Roy Tomas and inker Tom Palmer, are credited with turning the characters around, all three winning the Alley Awards (Best Pencil Artist, Best Inking Artist, Best Writer). That same year Deadman entered the Hall of Fame and Adams received a Special Award for "the new perspective and dynamic vibrance he has brought to the field of comic art."

Awards could not save X-Men, which folded with issue 66 (Mar 1970). Adams continued to draw horror comics for Marvel (Tower of Shadows) and Warren (Vampirella), but it was his debut on Batman which was to cement his place in comics' history. He debuted in Detective Comics (Jan 1970) with a story by writer Dennis O'Neil and, in the next eighteen months, introduced the characters Man-Bat and Ra's al Ghul. Adams' talent to draw realistic figures helped ground the series in the real after years of camp adventure that had overtaken the comic book following the success of the 1966-68 TV series. Adams and O'Neil gave Gotham back its brooding hero and reestablished characters like The Joker as a homicidal maniac rather than the prancing buffoonery of the ABC TV show.

Adams and O'Neill also performed a similar revamping of Green Lantern and Green Arrow. Green Lantern was renamed Green Lantern/Green Arrow with issue 76 (Apr 1970) and took the two characters on a journey across America that ran for two years and encompassed one of the pair's most controversial stories in which Green Arrow's ward, the clean-cut Speedy, was revealed as a heroin addict. The series ended with issue 89 (May 1972) ... the frustrating truth being that controversy in comics rarely translated into sales to the broader public. Speaking in 1978, Adams told The Comics Journal, "It takes a good year to get somebody used to a new idea, to get a market used to a new idea ... It takes a while for the news to get around. By the time the news got around to Green Lantern / Green Arrow it was cancelled."

With the exception of his work on Batman, Adams became a more sporadic contributor to DC, although he was involved in a number of 'event' comics, such as the inter-company crossover, Superman vs. The Amazing Spider-Man (1976) and Superman vs. Muhammad Ali (1978), the latter a 72-page story teaming Superman with boxer Ali to battle aliens.

In 1971, Adams and Dick Giordano, an inker with whom he often worked, set up Continuity Graphics Associates Inc. to produce storyboards for movies and produce comic art for advertising. A studio was set up in New York through which dozens of artists passed. Advertising work would often be passed around various artists with Adams and Giordano inking the main figures. This team effort was often credited to the "Crusty Bunkers", including numerous inking jobs for DC Comics, in the period 1972-77. Adams was also the art director and costume designer for Warp! (1973) a Broadway play by film director Stuart Gordon and playwright Lenny Kleinfeld.

By the late 1970s, Adams was almost invisible at DC or Marvel due, he said, to the introduction of a Work-For-Hire contract which he considered to be "against the intent of the new copyright law." In 1978 he helped set up the Comics Creators' Guild, which attracted 50 members. The Guild, says Adams, achieved many of its aims.

Adams also took time out to study a film course at NYU and filmed a full-length horror film, Nannaz, on a $30,000 budget. It starred Adams, his children Jason and Zeea and comic personalities Gray Morrow and Denys Cowan and told the story of two children who protect an invention of their father's from crooks with the aid of a toy monkey. It was reputedly released via Troma Entertainment in Europe in 1986 or 1987 under the title Death to the Pee-Wee Squad.

In the 1980s, Adams was tempted back into comics and produced Ms. Mystic (1982) and Skateman (1983) for Pacific Comics, the latter lasting only a single issue which was cited as the worst single comic of the past 25 years by Kitchen Sink Press's World's Worst Comics Awards (1990). Ms. Mystic, a witch in the modern world, appeared only twice from Pacific before transferring to Adams' own company, Continuity Comics in 1987.

Formed in 1984, Continuity launched a number of titles, including Zero Patrol, a reworking of a Spanish series by Esteban Maroto (2 issues, 1984-85) and Echo of Futurepast, an anthology which serialised a number of creations that Adams had planned as books to be published in Europe, including a Dracula-Werewolf-Frankenstein team-up by Adams (based on a 1975 comic book and record set, A Story of Dracula, the Wolfman and Frankenstein from Power Records), "Bucky O'Hare" by Larry Hama & Michael Golden, "Tippie Toe Jones" by Lindley Farley & Louis Mitchell and "Mudwogs" by Arthur Suydam.

Continuiuty entered the superhero market with Armor (1985-92), Revengers (1986-89), Toyboy (1986-89), Samuree (1987-91), Zero Patrol (1987-89), Ms. Mystic (1987-93), Urth 4 (1989-90) and Megalith (1989-93). A 1993 relaunch saw a number of series revert to issue one and new titles appear, the Continuity line-up now including Armor, Cyberrad, Earth, Hybrids, Megalith and Ms. Mystic, with Samuree, Shaman and Valerie, She-Bat added soon after. Continuity were caught up in the collapse of the speculative comics' boom in 1994 part-way through a company-wide crossover. At the time, Adams was also involved in a court case – with Michael Netzer over the rights to Ms. Mystic – which was dismissed in 1997.

One Continuity success was Bucky O'Hare, which became an animated TV series in 1991-92 under the title Bucky O'Hare and the Toad Wars! on which Adams was credited as executive producer. Adams has worked as a concept designer on movies such as From Beyond (1986), Dolls (1987), Circuitry Man (1990), and the Skeleton Warriors TV series (1994-95).

Adams continues to work with Continuity Studios to produce material for companies, including motion capture comics (such as Astonishing X-Men: Gifted, scripted by Joss Whedon, in 2009 and the upcoming Neal Adams' Blood, based on his Dark Horse Presents series), animatics and CGI. He has also recently been involved with the Disney Educational productions to produce They Spoke Out: American Voices against the Holocaust, an online educational motion comics series that relates the stories of Americans who protested the Nazis or aided Jews during the Holocaust. The first episode was screened in April 2010.

Neal Adams' Monsters, the long-promised story featuring Frankenstein, the Werewolf and Dracula, appeared as a hardcover book in 2004. Adams has occasionally returned to mainstream comics including stories for Giant Size X-Men #3 (2005) and Young Avengers Special #1 (2006) for Marvel and Batman: Odyssey (2010-12) for DC. It was recently (May 2012) announced that Adams would be co-writing (with Christos Gage) The First X-Men, a 5-issue mini-series which Adams would be drawing. Adams has also been involved in a 5-part Wolverine project.

Adams has been twice married, to Cory Adams and Marilyn Adams. His children include daughters Kristine Stone and Zeea Moss and sons Jason (a sculptor under the name Spyda), Joel and Josh Adams.
Source: Steve Holland.
Neal Adams art

See illustrators issue 16 for a Neal Adams feature article.
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Charlie Adlard biography

Charlie Adlard biography

Charlie Adlard
Charlie Adlard has been discovered and rediscovered a number of times in both the UK and US. After producing a string of short-lived strips beginning with Biggles Bear in 1989, Adlard approached Steve MacManus with samples and was offered a Judge Dredd strip. He then drew various strips for the Judge Dredd Megazine, notably Armitage, about a brutal Brit-Cit cop and his partner, Treasure Steel (who subsequently featured in her own series), and for Marvel UK, where his best work was probably Dances With Demons, a 4-issue mini-series penned by Simon Jowett; a second collaboration with Jowett, entitled 'Bloodrush', went unpublished.

By this time, Adlard had been discovered by American publishers, drawing stories for Black Orchid Annual, Marvel Comics Presents and Good Guys. After producing a five-issue run of Mars Attacks! for Topps, Adlard began working on the best-selling X-Files comic strip from the same publisher. The strip was a tremendous success and was still selling an average 130,000 copies per issue when Adlard decided to leave, claiming that the strip was straight-jacketed by the demands of the company and he had little artistic control.

He left to work on Shadowman for Acclaim and, although never short of relatively high-profile work (on, for instance, The Crow, Gen13, Superman and X-Men, it might be said that Adlard was critically discovered only when he began working on Larry Young's Astronauts in Trouble in 1999.

In the 2000s, Adlard was, again, kept busy on a range of titles, including Blair Witch: Dark Testaments and Double Image for Image; The Authority and The Establishment for WildStorm, Before the Fantastic Four, X-Men Unlimited, Peter Parker: Spider-Man, ThunderBolts and Warlock for Marvel and Batman/Scarface: A Psychodrama, Green Arrow, Green Lantern, Harley Quinn and Batman: Gotham Knights for DC.

However, it was with The Walking Dead for Image that Adlard was yet again rediscovered in 2004. Adlard replaced original artist Tony Moore with issue 7 (April 2004) and has continued the series ever since. The post-zombie apocalypse storyline proved very popular with readers and The Walking Dead won the Eisner Award for Best Continuing Series in 2010.

Adlard has retained his connections with the UK, drawing the graphic novel Playing the Game by Doris Lessing in 1995 and episodes of Nikolai Dante for 2000AD in the late 1990s. However, it was the relaunch of Pat Mills' Savage in 2004 that brought Adlard back to the attention of fans of British comics. He went on to draw three series of the character's revival between 2004 and 2007.
Source: Steve Holland.
Charlie Adlard art
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Martin Aitchison biography

Martin Aitchison biography

Martin Aitchison (born 1919; UK)
Aitchison was born in Birmingham. He was educated at Ellesmere College in Shropshire, leaving aged 15 to attend the Birmingham School of Art and then Slade School of Art. He married fellow art student Dorothy Self.

He exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1939. He was deaf, excluding him from active service in the Second World War, but he worked for Vickers Aircraft as a technical illustrator. He produced drawings for the bouncing bomb designed by Barnes Wallis for the Dam Busters air raid.

He became a freelance commercial artist after the war, producing drawings for a range of magazines. His earliest work was for Hulton Press' Lilliput magazine. He drew for Girl, filling in for Ray Bailey on Kitty Hawke and her All-Girl Air Crew, and illustrating Flick and the Vanishing New Girl in the first Girl annual.

He began to work for the Eagle in 1952, drawing the French Foreign Legion strip Luck of the Legion, written by Geoffrey Bond, for nearly ten years, including spin-off strips in ABC Film Review in 1952. He also drew spy series Danger Unlimited and adaptations of Arthur Conan Doyle's The Lost World and C. S. Forrester's Horatio Hornblower stories for the Eagle, and Arty and Crafty, written by Geoffrey Bond, for Eagle's junior companion paper Swift. His work for comics displayed his talents in an exuberant and creative medium, working mainly from imagination.

He joined Ladybird Books in 1963, and with Harry Wingfield illustrated many titles in its new Key Words Reading Scheme books, also known as Peter and Jane, which were used to teach so many British children to read. The consistency, naturalistic style and attention to detail of the artist made him a favourite with the prolific British publisher and over a period of a quarter of a century, he illustrated at least 100 different titles. Martin Aitchison was not the only artist to make the switch from The Eagle to Ladybird; Frank Hampson and Frank Humphris also followed the same path.

He left Ladybird in 1987, and retired - apart from drawing a new comic strip, Justin Tyme - ye Hapless Highwayman, written by Geoffrey Bond, and later his son Jim, for the fanzine Eagle Times from 1998 to 2004.
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Cecil Aldin biography

Cecil Aldin biography

Cecil Aldin (28 April 1870 - 6 January 1935)
During his lifetime, Cecil Aldin was described as one of the leading spirits in the renaissance of British sporting art. Following the death of Henry Aiken in 1851, sporting art had been in the doldrums—the comic art of John Leech aside—until the emergence of Aldin and Denholm Armour (1864-1949) towards the end of the 19th century. Between them, they founded a school of realistic portrayal of country pursuits which not only appealed to sportsmen but to the broader public.

He was particularly noted for painting of horses, dogs and hunting scenes—a hobby he particularly enjoyed. The anonymous writer of Aldin's obituary in The Times noted, "But there never yet has been a painter of dogs fit to hold a candle to him. Of all his immensely diverse interests the study of dogs came foremost. as an artist he had the ability to portray the character of his subject: as a man he understood that subject with the sympathy that enabled him to show us our very friend himself ... Somebody once complained that his drawings of dogs were 'too human'; they were not, but often showed character that even their owners had not noticed."

Cecil Charles Windsor Aldin was born in Slough, Buckinghamshire, on 28 April 1870, the son of Charles, a well-to-do builder and contractor, and Sarah Aldin. From an early age he was keen on sketching animals and the countryside and he was encouraged in his artistic aspirations by his father, who readily agreed to his studying art, after which he studied anatomy at South Kensington and animal painting at Midhurst, Sussex, under W. Frank Calderon, who went on to found the School of Animal Painting in 1894.

The Aldin family, which also included Cecil's siblings Arthur Reginald (1872-1937), Percy Charles (1874-1956), Mildred Lilian (later Dunn; 1876-1931), had moved to Clapham and lived in a house called Windemere on the south side of Clapham Common.

Aldin moved first to Chelsea and then to Bedford Park, Chiswick, where he found himself in a brotherhood of artists which included James Pryde and his brother-in-law William Nicholson—the Beggarstaff Brothers—and John Hassall, Phil May, Dudley Hardy, Lance Thackeray and many others; this wide range of friends and colleagues led to much cross-pollination of ideas and techniques.

One of his earliest commissions came from a Master of Foxhounds who wanted a portrait of a horse, an old polo pony, with the horse itself as payment, which Aldin housed in a bicycle shed. Before long, he could be found hacking on his own mount from Bedford Park to meets at Esher. Over a short period he accumulated a second horse (again in exchange for a portrait of a hunter), a Shetland pony, a donkey, two monkeys and thirteen dogs.

His artwork sales paid for his sporting hobbies and there was no shortage of magazines and newspapers who wanted Aldin's work. He found early success when he was asked to illustrated Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Stories in Pall Mall Budget (1894-95). He produced numerous sporting colour prints as well as a series on old inns of England (1919-20), illustrated R. S. Surtees' famous hunting character Jorrocks (Jorrocks on 'Uniting, 1909; Handley Cross, 1911), Dickens' Pickwick Papers (1910) and many other books, as well as contributing to Ladies Pictorial, Illustrated London News, Sketch, The Gentlewoman, Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, The Queen, Penny Illustrated Paper, The Sphere, Country Gentleman, Printers' Pie, Windsor,Cassell's Family Magazine, Ludgate Monthly, Royal Magazine, Black and White, Good Words, Boy's Own Paper, The Captain, Animal World, Land and Water Illustrated, The Poster, Pearson's Magazine and Punch, amongst others.

In his autobiography, Aldin claimed: "I may as well state here and have done with it that I have no pretensions to Art. Art for the true artist should have a capital A. For me, I am ashamed to say, it has had a rather small one for my painting has always been founded on substrata of hunting possibilities, that is to say, it has had to provide me with the wherewithal to enable me to hunt, and has been tainted with this aftermath of sporting commercialism."

Aldin's talents did not go unrecognised: he was a member of the Royal Society of British Artists, the London Sketch Club and had many paintings exhibited. He was said to be a man of great charm and organised various shows, including childrens' pony shows at Cloutsham Ball and Dunster, le Touquet, and dog shows which were not always serious (with awards for the ugliest dog, for example).

Aldin suffered from rheumatoid arthritis, aggravated by falls in the hunting field, which forced him to give up the sport. He retired to the Balearic Islands, taking all his dogs with him (horses were left behind with approved new owners) and made his home at Camp de Mar, Andraitz, Mallorca. He died at 20 Devonshire Place, Marylebone, London, on 6 January 1935. He was survived by his wife and daughter, his son having been killed in action whilst serving with the Corps of Royal Engineers in 1916.
Source: Steve Holland.
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Graham Allen biography

Graham Allen biography

Graham Allen (born 1940; UK)
Graham Allen was the son of variety performer Clive Allen. He joined Fleetway's staff, where he was working as an art bodger on Cowboy Comics Library by 1957. He drew comic strips for IPC titles from the mid 1960s on, including "Sir Munchkin" (1965) for Lion and "One Man and his Dog" for Buster. He also drew a weekly strip, "Lord Elpus" (1965), for the Sunday Extra newspaper. He then moved to Odhams Press, where he drew in a frenetic Leo Baxendale-inspired style for Wham!, Pow! and Smash!, including "Tuffy McGrew" and "The Nervs" for the latter.

When Odhams merged into IPC, Allen became a regular artist on their humour comics, drawing “Give a Dog a Bone” (1969) for Whizzer and Chips, "Mutt 'n' Chops" (1969), "Fiends and Neighbours" (1973, later in Cor!!), "Scruffy Dog and Shaggy Dog" and "Clarence Stringbean" for Buster, and “Eddie” (1970) and "Spoilsport" (1973) for Cor!!.

Other IPC titles he worked on include TV21, ("Mickey's Moonbugs"), Look-In ("Please Sir!" and "The Fenn Street Gang", 1972), Score 'n' Roar ("Trouble Shooter"), Whoopee! ("Spy School", 1974). He also worked for DC Thomson, drawing "Copycat" for Magic and "Digby the Human Mole" for Plug, and Polystyle's TV Comic, drawing "Nellie and her Tellie" (1974).

From 1981 he drew the daily strip Pub Dog for the Daily Express, and later the Evening News. Other newspaper strips he drew in the 80s and 90s include King Kat for the Daily Star, One Boy and his Dog for the News of the World and Rocky Starr in People Magazine. He also tried his hand at political cartooning for the London Daily News and Daily Express. He has also drawn for Viz, and is a prolific book illustrator.
Source: UK Comics Wiki http://ukcomics.wikia.com/wiki/Graham_Allen
Graham Allen art
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Matias Alonso biography

Matias Alonso biography

Matias Alonso Andrés (born 1935, Spain)
Matías Alonso Andrés was born in Valle de Trapagaran (Euzkadi), near the Bay of Biscay in northern Spain, in 1935. An illustrator and painter from childhood, he won a Segundo Premio Nacional de Pintura (Second National Painting Prize) at the age of 16. He made his comic book debut in the pages of Colorin and Azucena but established himself at the age of 18 when he began drawing El Charro Termerario (1953), written by Pedro Muñoz for Barcelona-based Editora Grafidea. The character Juan Miguel, known as El Charro the bold, was first to be found in the wild west of Mexico and California, often fighting on behalf of the Aztec Indians. After 44 issues, Muñoz and Alonso changed the focus of the strip from Juan Miguel to a secondary character introduced to the strip, the teenage Flaviano, and his friend Knut.

The new series, La Capitana (1955), was set on the high seas and around the globe, from Africa to Australia, and Alonso could be seen developing as an artist: Jaume Salva i Lara has commented (and I'm paraphrasing because I know almost no Spanish and online translators are, at best, a little sloppy) that Alonso's artwork had taken on a lot of personality, the ships and military uniforms (such as those of the French foreign legion) drawn with an eye for detail and the exotic settings showing the influence of Hollywood movies. To counter this rather thankless attention to realism, Alonso tried to make the pages stylistically interesting, although the results could be somewhat mannered. After a further 44 issues, the focus changed again. Now married (although his wife falls ill and is soon left behind), Flaviano travels to India for his next adventure, El Amuleto Verde (1956; The Green Amulet), a somewhat disappointing finale to the trilogy as the artwork became hurried and less detailed, the action bowdlerised and the storyline less interesting. It was brought to an end after 24 weeks.

Alonso went on to draw more historical strips Jarko, el Temible (20 episodes, 1957) and Luis Valiente (24 episodes, 1957) before adapting a series of science fiction stories, commonly known as 'La saga de los Aznar', written by George H. White (the pen-name of Spanish author Pascual Enguídanos Usach, 1923-2006), into comics, producing 44 issues under the title Hazañas de la Juventud Audaz (Daring Feats of Youth), published by Editora Valenciana in 1959-60. Alonso then took over the artwork of the famous Spanish historical strip El Guerrero del Antifaz (The Warrior of the Mask) in 1961, which he drew in the style of the strip’s originator, Manuel Gago. He continued the adventures for 80 issues before Gago returned to the series. To some fans of the famous strip Alonso's artwork, influenced by Gago from the start, was a disappointing hiatus in a series that belonged to Gago; others consider the episodes featuring the clean, precise line of Alonso's artwork and storylines by Vincente Tortajada to be amongst the best. It was around this period that Alonso began working with Luis Bermejo, a Valencian artist who was one of the leading lights of Spanish comics (Aventuras del FBI, Apache). Alonso began working for D.C. Thomson's Commando in 1962 (probably via Bermejo and Selecciones Illustrades) whilst continuing to work locally, drawing various episodes of Espíritu del Oeste (1963, written by Pedro Quesada) for the Spanish publisher Maga.

Alonso also drew La isla del Tesoro (1964) for the magazine Flecha Roja and Las Aventuras de Marco Polo (1964) for Pantera Negra, the latter with Bermejo who, at that time, was also drawing Heros the Spartan for Eagle. In Spain, Alonso collaborated with Bermejo on illustrations for children’s books such as Vida y Costumbres de los Vikingos and África y sus habitantes (1965). By the mid-1960s he was firmly established in the UK market, drawing for Commando, Battle Picture Library, Air Ace Picture Library and War Picture Library, sometimes working in collaboration with Bermejo and with Eustaquio Segrelles. A fine example of his collaborative work with Bermejo can be seen in the "Heros" strip that appeared in Eagle Annual 1967, although his contributions to Boys World Annual 1968 and especially the 1969 volume, show what he was capable of working solo.

From 1967 he became a regular contributor to Victor, drawing dozens of weekly strips over the next 23 years. Often to be found drawing historical or war adventures, the titles alone offer an insight to the range of strips he drew: "Johnny Gurka", "The Lost Warriors of Tartary", "Task Force with Tusks", "Jungle Joe", "The Planet Seekers", "Vengeance Stalks the Veldt", "The Sons of Ra", "The Wild Colonial Boy", "The White Tiger", "Wings of Death", "Eagle of the Rising Sun" and "The Haunting of Running Bear".

Alonso also drew occasional strips outside of the pages of Victor and Commando, including a handful of stories for girls' comics Judy, Diana, Debbie and Emma and the boys' adventure comic Bullet ("Claws of Terror") in the 1970s.

His last known contributions to British comics appeared in the early 1990s when he drew strips for Judy Picture Library and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. By then Alonso had established himself in Spain as a painter--noted for his landscapes of northern Spain and of Spanish ports with boats jostling in the water--and has had his work exhibited in Barcelona and Madrid.
Matias Alonso art
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Alvaro biography

Alvaro biography

Alvaro ?Mendoza (possibly born 1952; Spain or Mexico)
Artist, possibly Spanish, about whom nothing can be traced. A number of other artists share this name – one, Alvaro Mendoza, a Mexican artist who has a similar signature (written in capital letters). Mendoza was born in Izlahuaaca, Mexico, in 1952 and clearly would not have been contributing to Look and Learn in January 1963 (!), when two images of Don Quixote and his squire, Sancho Panza, appeared in the magazine.

The signature on the above picture was removed when it was printed in Look and Learn, as was the colour: it appeared only in black & white.
Source: Steve Holland.
Alvaro art
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Andreas (Martens) biography

Andreas (Martens) biography

Andreas Martens (born 3 January 1951; Weißenfels, Germany)
Andreas, pen name for Andreas Martens, is a German-born Belgian comic artist best known for his science-fiction serials 'Rork', 'Arq' and 'Capricorne'. Born in Weißenfels, East Germany, Martens studied at the Academy of Fine Arts in Düsseldorf. He eventually ended up at the Brussels Saint-Luc Institute, where he studied with young ambitious comics artists like Berthet, Foerster and Cossu.

Adapting his first name as his pseudonym, his first work appeared in the Saint-Luc magazine Le 9e Rêve, and subsequently created 'Udolfo' in cooperation with his teacher Eddy Paape in Tintin. In the same magazine, he embarked on the philosophical fantasy comic series 'Rork' in 1978. The series was collected in books by Le Lombard between 1984 and 1993 and in between his work on the 'Rork' stories, Andreas published many genre one-shot comics, which cleverly expanded the limits of the comics medium.

À Suivre published several of the short stories he made with scriptwriter François Rivière, that were later collected in the album 'Révélations Posthumes' in 1980. From the early 1980s, he expanded his activities with 'Cyrrus' and 'Mil' in Métal Hurlant, 'Cromwell Stone' (Deligne), 'La Caverne du Souvenir' (Lombard), as well as an adaptation of 'Jane Eyre' for Je Bouquine. After publishing 'Raffington Detective' with Lombard in 1989, Andreas began an association with the publishing house Delcourt.

Delcourt reprinted all his non-Lombard albums, and published new works like 'Coutoo' (1989), 'Dérives' (1991), 'Aztèques' (1992), and 'Le Triangle Rouge' (1995). Andreas has also published his ongoing science-fiction series 'Arq' with this publisher since 1997. In that same year, he returned to Lombard to start another sci-fi serial based on a secondary character from his 'Rork' series, 'Capricorne'.

Andreas teamed up with Philippe Foerster in 1995 and created 'Le Styx' for the collection Signé of Lombard. He joined the magazine Brazil in 1994, where he drew 'Les Lettres' in cooperation with Jamsin and Antonio Cossu. Andreas has illustrated the third installment of the series 'Donjon Monstres' for Joann Sfar and Lewis Trondheim in 2002, and he created the adventure one-shot 'Quintos' with Isabelle Cochet for Dargaud in 2006. As a scriptwriter, Andreas has cooperated with Berthet ('Mortes Saisons', Dupuis) and Christian Durieux (the detective series 'Mobilis', Delcourt 1999-2002).

His genre series include Arq, Cromwell Stone, Cyrrus, Rork and its spin-off, Capricorne, as well as a number of single works such as La Caverne du Souvenir (The Cave of Memory), Coutoo, Dérives (Adrift), Aztèques, and Révélations Posthumes (Posthumous Revelations).
Source: Lambiek
Andreas (Martens) art
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Colin Andrew biography

Colin Andrew biography

Colin Andrew
Colin Andrew has had a long and varied career in comics and as an illustrator and book cover artist, yet remains one of the lesser-known names in the field despite some high profile work.

Born and raised in Dundee, Andrew found work as a junior in Bill McCail's Mallard Features studio in Glasgow. His first published work was a cartoon in Lilliput magazine, and his first strip was for a local paper where he dreamed up the storylines and drew layouts for a story of anthropomorphic trains, in the spirit of Thomas the Tank Engine. After his national service, he moved to London and joined the King-Ganteaume studio, working mostly Westerns and historical strips for Pancho Villa, Rocky Mountain King, TV Heroes and other Len Miller titles. When the King-Ganteaume partnership split, Andrew continued to work for Kenneth King, contributing to Lone Star and Space Ace.

In the late 1950s, Andrew drew a great deal for Zip and Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse, notably the Captain Morgan strip in Zip. In 1960 he assisted Syd Jordan, another McCail studio alumni, on Jordan's Daily Express strip Jeff Hawke. The strips were written by Willie Patterson, with whom Andrew collaborated on two newspaper strips in Lord Beaverbrook's Glasgow Daily Herald, both factual strips, one a history of the world cup, the other on famous football players.

His favourite strip was also penned by Patterson, What Is Exhibit X in Boys' World, starring John Brody, a scientific investigator for the Daily Newsflash. The strip was subsequently taken over and Andrew found himself drawing The Boy Who Knew Too Much in Buster as well as features for Boys' World, Eagle, Lion and Tiger over the next few years. He returned to strip work drawing Tomorrow West in Solo, followed by stints in Fireball XL5 and Stingray in TV Century 21 and Alias Smith and Jones for TV Action. Since the 1970s he has concentrated on illustration (including work for World of Wonder and Look and Learn) and book covers; in particular he supplied New English Library with many quickly executed covers in the 1970s. He has also storyboarded television commercials, including the UK Government's PowerGen sell-off. In the 1980s he also drew editorial cartoons for a local newspaper for three years.

Andrew returned to comics in the 1990s via his friend Syd Jordan, who suggested he submit samples to Fleetway and Marvel UK. He was contacted by the latter and worked irregularly on episodes of Dr. Who strips in Doctor Who Magazine.
Source: Steve Holland.
Colin Andrew art
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Peter Andrews biography

Peter Andrews biography

Peter Andrews; UK
Peter Andrews was active as an artist and illustrator in Bristol for many years where he was an active member of the Bristol Savages Artists group. Most of his work is now held in private collections.

His output was very varied ranging from strong graphic style illustration to advertising art, Cornish landscape, pure abstract art and Pop art; also sculpture and large murals.
Peter Andrews art
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Luis Arcas Brauner biography

Luis Arcas Brauner biography

Luis Arcas Brauner (20 October 1934 - July 1989, Valencia, Spain)
A widely admired painter of portraits (including those of Spanish royalty), landscapes and still life. He enrolled in the School of Commerce at his father's insistence. Arcas, who wanted to devote himself to the arts, eventually entered the Escuela Superior de Bellas artes de San Carlos in Valencia, where he studied until 1954. In that year he held his first exhibition.

Arcas won numerous awards throughout his career as a painter, including the Silver Medal at the 13th Exposición de arte Universitario in 1952, the Premio extradordinario nacional at the 5th National Competition of Fine Arts in Alicante in 1956 and the Premio "La Coruña" at the exposición Nacional de Bellas Artes in Madrid in 1960.

His work was widely exhibited in Spain and in North and South America. He was one of the artists who participated in the Setenta y cinco años de pintura valenciana (Seventy-Five years of Valencian painting) exhibition supported by the Valencia City Council in 1975. A retrospective of his work, Treinta años de vida profesional (Thirty years of professional life), was exhibited at the Caja de Ahorros de Valencia.

He died in Cambridge, England, in July 1989, aged 54. Five years after his death, his work was celebrated as part of Un siglo de pintura valenciana (A century of Valencian painting) in Valencia.
Source: Steve Holland.
Luis Arcas Brauner art
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Mike Arens biography

Mike Arens biography

Michael H. Arens (2 December 1915 - 19 June, 1976, USA)
Mike Arens was born in California and began his career as an animator, joining Walt Disney Studios as a production artist in 1937. He worked on the Dance of the Hours segment of Fantasia, and on Pinocchio. After performing his military service in 1942-47, Arens became a regular newspaper strip artist with Hey, Mac! (1947-61).

He turned to comic books in the late 1940s, drawing artwork for Street & Smith's Top Secrets in 1949. From 1952, he drew dozens of strips for Dell Publishing, his first work mostly western strips such as Gene Autry (1951-52, 1954-55, 1957), The Frontiersman (1952-58), Buck Jones (1953-54), Rex Allen (1953, 1956-57), Flying-A's Range Rider (1954-55), Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier (1955), Dale Evans (1956), Chuckwagon Charley (c.1958), and various for Western Roundup (1952-58).

Arens began producing Disney characters for overseas comics such as the British Huckleberry Hound comic in 1961-62. For Western Publishing he drew a variety of Disney and adventure strips, including Chip 'n' Dale (Walt Disney's Comics and Stories, 1962), Goofy (1963), Donald Duck (1963), Mary Poppins (Gold Key one-shot, 1964), My Favourite Martian (1964-66), Tarzan (1965-66) and Korak (1966).

For King Features he drew the Roy Rogers Sunday strip (1959-62), Uncle Remus and his Tales of Br'er Rabbit (1968), Mickey Mouse (1968) and both daily and Sunday episodes of Scamp (with inker Manuel Gonzales, 1969-76). Arens was also responsible for a number of Disney Christmas Stories--including Snow White's Christmas Surprise (1966) and Dumbo and the Christmas Mystery (1967)--and many newspaper adaptations for King Features/Walt Disney Productions, including Robin Hood (1973-74), Alice in Wonderland (1974), Herbie Rides Again (1974), (1976), Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too (1975), and many others.

Arens had a parallel career in animation from 1965, working as a story director for Grantray-Lawrence on their Spider-Man and Marvel Superheroes animated shows. In 1967 he became a layout artist for Hanna-Barbera, working on dozens of animated TV shows, including Fantastic 4 (1967), The Banana Splits Adventure Hour (1968-70), Scooby Doo, Where Are You! (1969-70), amongst many. He was also layout artist on Charlotte's Web, the 1973 Hanna-Barbera movie adaptation of E. B. White's classic novel about a pig trying to avoid being killed for Christmas. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Mike Arens art
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John J Arnold biography

John J Arnold biography

John J Arnold
John J. Arnold was a commercial artist specialising in transport. He is known to have contributed illustrations to Look and Learn and Speed & Power magazines, and almost certainly contributed to other IPC Transport titles. His work for Look and Learn often involved beautifully rendered line & wash diagrams of cars, such as in his 'Classic Cars' series (1974) and 'Novelties of Mobility' (1974-75).

He also illustrated other forms of transport, including sailing ships and paddle steamers. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
John J Arnold art
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Martin Asbury biography

Martin Asbury biography

Martin Asbury
Martin Asbury grew up addicted to comics, trawling through newsagents and book shops looking for American comics. Influenced by Burne Hogarth's 'Tarzan', Classics Illustrated and Frank Hampson's 'Dan Dare', he was educated at Merchant Taylors' School and studied painting at St. Martin's College of Art. Apart from illustrating a story for a comic book giveaway, his first illustrative work included the sheet music for Ron Grainer's The Maigret Theme and painting cardboard cut-outs for use on TV.

An advert in an magazine led him to apply for a job as an assistant for "an international cartoonist"; this was on Flash Gordon and Asbury moved to Austria for six months before clashes with Dan Barry led to his departure. Back in England he designed cards for Hallmark, rising to become their chief designer.

Married in 1969, he decided to go freelance and found work drawing for D. C. Thomson's Bunty. With the launch of Wizard in 1970 he graduated onto boys' adventure strips, drawing Soldiers of the Jet Age, The Crimson Claw, The Secret of Deep 16 and others for the paper. At the same time, he also found work on Joe 90: Top Secret, soon to merged with TV21, where he drew Forward from the Back Streets and Tarzan.

Some short-run strips in Countdown led to him drawing Cannon for TV Action and TV Comic before he was hired by Look-In, where, after briefly drawing Follyfoot, he had his first big hit with Kung Fu.

Asbury took over the Dr Who strip in TV Comic before returning to Look-In to draw more 'Kung Fu', and his biggest hit, The Six Million Dollar Man, which ran for four years (1975-79). At the same time, Asbury took over the artwork for Garth in the Daily Mirror following the death of Frank Bellamy. He was to draw the strip for 21 years, working initially with Jim Edgar. From 1995, Asbury also scriptwrited the strip.

In the early days of the strip, Asbury was also able to continue working for Look-In, his strips for that paper including 'Dick Turpin', 'Battlestar Galactica' and 'Buck Rogers in the 25th Century'. However, an opportunity arose in the early 1980s for a change in artistic direction.

Asbury explained how he became a storyboard artist in an interview in Starlog: "When I was a strip cartoonist, I occasionally did TV commercial storyboards. A friend of mine (Dez Skinn) had an agency dealing with design and graphics and one day a man literally walked in off the street looking for a storyboard artist. I met this guy, production designer Stuart Craig, and he was about to start work on the film Greystoke with director Hugh Hudson. It was that simple.

"For Greystoke I did nearly 3,500 huge drawings, many of them in full colour. I didn't know they were going to be fed through a copying machine and come out as grey blotches. I learned my lesson on that.

Since the release of Greystoke in 1984, Asbury has storyboarded dozens of movies, a few sample credits would include Labyrinth, Willow, Alien 3, Chaplin, Interview with the Vampire, Fierce Creatures, Quills, Lara Croft: Tomb Raider, Thunderpants, The Hours, Troy, Alexander, Batman Begins, The Da Vinci Code, The Boat That Rocked, the last six James Bond movies (Brosnan/Craig) and Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets.

He continues to work as a storyboard artist, his most recent work being for the upcoming Between Two Worlds. Taken from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Martin Asbury art
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Leslie Ashwell Wood biography

Leslie Ashwell Wood biography

Leslie Ashwell Wood (c.1903 - 1973)
Leslie Ashwell Wood was best known for his educational and detailed cutaway drawings and paintings of trains, boats, planes and all manner of mechanical inventions, often featured in Modern Wonder and in the centre page spread of Eagle in the 1950s.
Leslie Ashwell Wood art

See illustrators issue 4 for a Leslie Ashwell Wood feature article.
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Ray Aspden biography

Ray Aspden biography

Ray Aspden
Ray Aspden has been an irregular comic strip writer and illustrator for 35 years, contributing Philpot Bottles' Orfice Boys Own to Denis Gifford's Ally Sloper in 1976-77, a cartoon strip that harked back to the 1930s penny comics, which would often feature a column from the paper's office boy recounting (in badly spelled text) what had been happening that week.

Ray, also a playwright, started writing for D. C. Thomson in the late 1970s, selling two strories to Victor, of which only one appeared (Stokehold Joe in 1980). In 1978, having spotted an advert in The Guardian, he contacted the editors of the upcoming science fiction pocket library, Starblazer, and began contributing scripts. His first submission, The Basilisk Face of Fear'- based loosely on the story of Perseus and the Gorgon's head, was accepted and published as Starblazer #2, 'The Domes of Death'. A second story, a reworking of the legend of Theseus and the Minotaur, followed, published as 'Sinister City' (Starblazer #19).

Ray eventually became one of Starblazer's most regular writers, penning 28 issues published between 1979 and 1986. Discussing his work for the series recently, he admitted that the pattern set for those years was to have one in three of his outlines accepted, either immediately or after some amendment. One ploy used by the editors was to send a cover, bought through an agency, and have Ray write a story around it - 'Terror Tomb' (Starblazer #62) being one example.

His best-known work for the series featured Hadron Halley, the idea springing from a reversal of 'sci-fi' (science fiction) - that fi-sci could stand for Fighting Scientist. The concept of 'Moonsplitter' (Starblazer #50) was to contrast the rational scientific approach of Halley to the gung-ho militarism of General Larz Pluto, although in writing the latter as a buffoon he "transgressed Thomsons moral code of wanting figures of authority to be seen as worthy of respect." He considers the final book "a mess".

As well as his Starblazer writing, Aspden also began contributing strips to two Welsh language publications Sboncyn and Deryn in the early 1980s, writing and drawing two humour strips, Jac-Do and Alys Ofalus. Sboncyn was relaunched as Penbwl in 1989, for which Aspden wrote and drew Huwi Hurt, a Dennis the Menace-type character which Aspden turned into a Hungry Horace clone. The monthly comic folded in 1995.

Since 2004, Aspden has written and drawn two regular strips for Spaceship Away!. Both Mekki and Our Bertie owe a stylistic debt to the Knockout in the 1950s, rather than Eagle.

Ray's interest in history led him to produce illustrations for the series Cutha's Chronicles for the quarterly magazine Wiðowinde (Bindweed), for members of The English Companions (a study group for people interested in the Anglo-Saxon period of British history), since 2005; he has also drawn strips for the historical magazine Facts & Fiction and recently supplied illustrations for the book Derbyshire FolkTales (2010). Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Sergio Asteriti biography

Sergio Asteriti biography

Sergio Asteriti (born 13 February 1930, Venice, Italy)
Sergio Asteriti attended the Venice's Scuola di Magisterto d’Arte, intent on a career in advertising. His first comics work appeared in 1949 when he drew the series I bucanieri for Risveglio, which was distributed around schools in Venice.

After taking only one examination, he left school and moved to Milan, finding work with the publicity agency SPINTA where his workload included drawing movie posters featuring many of the actors in vogue at the time. Two years later, the company went bankrupt and Asteriti found himself in Milan without any work.

Not wishing to return to Venice in defeat, Asteriti hawked his portfolio around various publishers. His interest in comics had developed as a child and, whilst still in Venice, he had known Giorgio Trevisan and Leone Frollo, the latter a Venetian contemporary who introduced him to Giorgio Bellavitis, and other members of the Asso di Picche group, Faustinelli, Ongaro and Pratt.

In 1955 he joined the group of talented newcomers who began working for Caregaro's Edizioni Alpe around that era. Asteriti created the character Bingo Bongo, the comic adventures of a young black boy, for the weekly Cucciolo. Other strips from this period included Congolino and Capitan Jolando, as well as covers for Voici d'Oltremare di Bianconi/Missionari Combboniani and contributions to La Vispa Teresa.

In 1958, Asteriti began working for the English market via Creazioni D'Ami, Asteriti assisted on Fun in Toyland and The Funny Tales of Freddie Frog for the nursery weekly Jack and Jill and eventually took them over. 'Freddie Frog' was passed on to other artists in 1960, but Asteriti continued to work on 'Fun in Toyland' for many years. He continued to draw for the British market until the mid-1970s, also contributing to Bobo Bunny, and illustrations to Disneyland and Walt Disney's Now I Know.

His work also continued to appear in Italy. In the early 1960s he also drew Hayawatha for Corriere dei Piccoli in collaboration with Antonio Lupatelli. Asteriti has alos illustrated fairy stories for AMZ, Boschi and Carroccio.

In 1963, Asteriti produced Pippo e la vacanza culturale, his first strip for the Italian Disney magazine Topolino. Over the next decade he contributed to Disney Italia with increasing regularity and quickly became recognised as one of the leading contributors, both as an artist and, since 1974, a scriptwriter (a task he occasionally shared with his older brother, Franco), and eventually dropped his other work in order to concentrate on Disney characters full time, especially Mickey Mouse. Asteriti has described Mickey as "the best friend of my childhood", a character with whom he grew up. "The only drawback is that I have grown older while he has remained the same, young and healthy, without ever catching a cold!"

Having written and drawn hundreds of stories, Asteriti continues to be one of the major contributors to Italian Disney comics, his illustrative, decorative style perfectly suited for adventures set in medieval and fairy-tale locations. He was awarded Il Premio Papersera in 2008. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Sergio Asteriti art
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Michel Atkinson biography

Michel Atkinson biography

Michel Atkinson
Something of a mystery man with regards to cover artwork. Michel Atkinson was an irregular contributor to various romance and schoolgirl pocket libraries from 1961 until the 1970s, producing covers for Romantic Confessions Picture Library (1961), Love Story PL (1961-62, 1965, 1969-70, 1973-74), True Life Library (1961-62, 1965-66, 1968-69), Princess PL (1961-63), Schoolgirls PL (1961-62), School Friend PL (1962-63), June and Schoolfriend and Princess PL (1968).

There were some fairly substantial gaps during which time he was probably doing book covers. He is known to have been a regular cover artist for the Hank Janson novels published by Roberts & Vinter in 1961-65 and a wide variety of genres for Digit Books in 1963-65.

Although fairly prolific, it is likely that 'Michel' (as he signed most of his book covers) found more regular work outside of producing book covers for paperbacks and for Fleetway Publications from the mid-1960s onwards. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Michel Atkinson art
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Dick Ayers biography

Dick Ayers biography

Richard Bache Ayers (born 28 April 1924; USA)
When Dick Ayers was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2007, it was in recognition of his talents as both an inker and penciller. In the former category, he famously inked the work of Jack Kirby when Kirby was at his peak in the 1950s and 1960s, including early episodes of The Fantastic Four; as a penciller he is best known for his work on Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos, his work winning the Alley Award for Best War Title in 1967 and 1968.

Richard Bache Ayers was born on 28 April 1924 in Ossining, New York, the son of John Bache Ayers, an insurance agent, and his wife Gladys Adelia (nee Minnerly), and could trace his ancestors back to pioneers who settled at Newbury Plantation, Massachusetts, in 1635. He was raised in Poultney, near Lake Cayuga, and later said that growing up on his uncle's farm contributed to his ability to draw horses. Ayers served with the Army Air Corps during the Second World War.

Ayers published his first comic strip in the military newspaper Radio Post in 1942. After leaving the army, he took an adventure story he had written and drawn to Dell Comics; they planned to publish it but the project was scrapped before publication. In 1947, he was taking evening classes at Burne Hogarth's Cartoonists and Illustrators School in New York City where he met Superman co-creator Joe Shuster, who would drop in to visit classes, and Marvin Stein, who was teaching classes as well as being Shuster's chief assistant. Visiting Shuster's nearby studio, Ayers began producing occasional pencils for Funnyman.

Shuster also introduced Ayers to Vin Sullivan of Magazine Enterprises where he began drawing Jimmy Durante and Western strips for A-1 Comics and Trail Colt. Ayers co-created The Calico Kid as a back-up for Tim Holt comic.
Whenever trouble loomed, the spineless Calico proved to be a master gunfighter. After five episodes, he revealed an even deeper secret: he was in truth Federal Marshal Rex Fury. Attacked and left for dead, Fury is visited by the ghosts of those who tried to tame the wild west – Wild Bill Hickok, Kit Carson, Calamity Jane and others – and Fury survives with their skills somehow imprinted on him. Dressed in a phosphorescent costume and riding a white stallion named Spectre, he becomes The Ghost Rider.

After his debut in Tim Holt #11, The Ghost Rider soon earned his own title in 1950, which Ayers continued until 1954. He also added stories featuring Bobby Benson's B-Bar-B Riders, based on the boy cowboy of the popular radio series, to his schedule in 1952. At the same time, he began working for Atlas Comics (the forerunner to today's Marvel Comics), drawing horror stories and a revival of The Human Torch.

Ayers was so busy, he employed Ernie Bache as an assistant and set up a small studio in the kitchen of an apartment owned by his wife's employer. In a 2001 interview, Ayers recalled: "Side-by-side we worked for—oh, that was '52. It wasn't until '55 when that damn Wertham thing came and killed all our books, The Ghost Rider and Human Torch. So we were down and we had, mostly, just Charlton. We didn't quite make it.
I lettered first and then I would pencil, and then I'd ink the outlines and then I'd give it to Ernie. Ernie would erase the page (laughs) and then he would finish it. He would put on all the blacks and the Kraft-Tone and bring in all that stuff. So we made a good team. I didn't bother throwing in heavy blacks. I would start them, maybe, but then he would accentuate the lines I'd put in, make them a little stronger. And he was very meticulous in his approach. I mean, everything had to be a certain formula so that we could knock out four pages a day, so he was a good asset for me."

The comic book industry was devastated by the introduction of the Comic Code Authority, who banned anything considered dangerous to juvenile morals. Horror and crime stories disappeared almost overnight and, after 167 stories, The Ghost Rider also fell victim to the sweeping industry changes. Work for Charlton Comics' Crime and Justice and Racket Squad in Action also disappeared.

Ayers' attempt at a superhero, The Avenger, lasted only one issue (it was continued by Bob Powell) and a Ghost Rider replacement, The Presto Kid (a cowboy magician who debuted in Red Mask #51), lasted only a few episodes.

Ayers subsequently concentrated on his work for Atlas, drawing back-up features with Kid Colt Outlaw, Outlaw Kid, Wyatt Earp and Rawhide Kid and, from 1959, inking Jack Kirby's monster stories in Strange Tales, Journey Into Mystery, Amazing Adventures, Tales to Astonish and Tales of Suspense and over two years of the syndicated newspaper strip 'Sky Masters of the Space Force' (1959-61).

As Atlas introduced new characters, and because Kirby was their go-to artist for new strips, Ayers found himself inking the first appearance of The Rawhide Kid (revamped in 1960), Ant-Man (Tales to Astonish #27, 1962), The Human Torch (first solo story, Strange Tales #101, 1962), Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos (1963), and early issues of The Fantastic Four, Thor and The Incredible Hulk (all in 1962).

Inking was a means to an end. Ayers "only inked to survive in comic books and support my family, which included my wife, 4 children and mother-in-law." When asked in 2003 who he enjoyed inking for, Ayers replied, "No one."

In 1964, Ayers took over completely from Kirby as penciller of Sgt. Fury with issue 8, beginning an almost unbroken decade-long run on the comic that was to last until issue 120. The series was penned by Stan Lee, Roy Thomas and, from 1967, by Gary Friedrich. The team of Friedrich, Ayers and inker John Severin turned the book into a recognisable classic; the Howling Commandos and their cigar-chomping leader, Nick Fury, battled around the world in a series of gritty, strongly moralistic stories which were often as negative about war as they were celebrations.

Initially, Ayers had wanted to come off the title: "I didn't like Kirby's pencilling of Sgt Fury and asked off after the 3rd issue. I was in the Army 1942 – 1945 and it didn't connect with how I pictured "army." When Stan put me on to pencilling it, it wasn't until I recalled how it was when, getting into the combat zone, we would exaggerate out combat stories to each other and do anything we could to look different from the others around us. I got a shoulder holster and .45 and wore ski sox and a silk scarf. Then Sgt Fury and His Howling Commandos became real to me."

In the 1970s, Ayers switched from Marvel to DC Comics, where he pencilled war stories for Star Spangled War Stories, Army at War, All-Out War and other titles. At the same time he pencilled various other series, including Kamandi, The Last Boy on Earth (1976-78), Unknown Soldier (1977-82), Scalphunter (1977-81), Sergeant Rock (1978-81) and Jonah Hex (1979-84). "I was able to accomplish 4 books a month. There'd always be a script for me every time I delivered my pencils," Ayers recalled. "As a result I think I did some of my best storytelling at DC. I was asked to pencil tight leaving the blacks and tones for the inker. It enabled me to do some of my best story telling in Kamandi, Jonah Hex and Unknown Soldier and all the other DC books they had me do."

In the 1980s, Ayers worked for a number of different companies, including Archie, Modern Publishing and Comico, and in the 1990s for Revolutionary and Topps. In 1984-85 he also drew promotional comics for Comic Shack featuring the Tandy Computer Whiz Kids. In 1985 he also accepted the National Cartoonists Society Award for Best Comic Book.

Ayers taught at the Joe Kubert School, his students including Tom Mandrake, Jan Dursemma and Karl Kessel.

Ayers' early work was rediscovered in 1990 and reprinted by AC Comics, although due to Marvel's copyright on a different character named Ghost Rider, the original had to became Haunted Horseman. Discovering the reprints, Ayers agreed to draw some new episodes.

In the new millennium, Ayers has continued to draw occasionally, contributing pin-ups and a number of short stories to benefit and tribute comics (Actor Comics Presents, 2006, The 3-Minute Sketchbook, 2007; The Uncanny Dave Cockrum, 2007). His latest work was an illustration of NY Police Detective John Wilson for the Marvel Mystery Handbook: 70th Anniversary Special (2009). Ayers' son, Rich, has also drawn comics.
Source: Steve Holland.
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Chris Bachalo biography

Chris Bachalo biography

Chris Bachalo (born August 23, 1965)
Chris Bachalo is an American comic book illustrator known for his quirky, cartoon-like style. He became well known for stints on DC Comics’ Shade, the Changing Man and Neil Gaiman's two Death series. Chris has also illustrated several of Marvel Comics’ X-Men-related series, including Generation X (which he co-created), X-Men vol 2, Uncanny X-Men, and Ultimate X-Men. Beginning in April, 2000 Chris illustrated his creator-owned series Steampunk.

Bachalo was born in Canada but was raised in Southern California. He has told interviewers that, as a child, he wanted to be a carpenter until he discovered he was allergic to dust. He attended the California State University at Long Beach, where he majored in graphic art and illustrated a few underground comics.

After graduation, Bachalo sought work in the mainstream comic book industry. His first published assignment was The Sandman #12 (Jan. 1990), part of the "The Doll's House" story arc, for DC Comics. Although before working on that issue, DC had already hired him as the regular artist for Shade, the Changing Man, an older property revived as an adult-oriented series by writer Peter Milligan.

Bachalo’s early work shows strong influence from Sam Kieth, Bill Sienkiewicz and Michael Golden. As his style developed, however, Bachalo’s work became more idiosyncratic. His early 1990s style is minimalist with strong, thick lines, quirky characters and little concern for realism. Bachalo did not shy away from detailed landscapes but showed a rare penchant for pages with many small panels.

In 1993, writer Neil Gaiman selected Bachalo for the Sandman miniseries Death: The High Cost of Living, starring the Sandman’s older sister. At the time, Sandman was one of the most popular and acclaimed series in the industry and the miniseries helped boost Bachalo’s visibility. The creative pair also reunited for Death: The Time of Your Life in 1996.

After working at Marvel (below), Bachalo briefly returned to DC in 1999 for The Witching Hour mini-series with writer Jeph Loeb for Vertigo.

While at DC Comics, Bachalo illustrated the first issue of X-Men Unlimited, which Marvel published as an anthology X-Men comic book. Based on the success and fanfare from X-Men Unlimited #1, in 1994, Bachalo ended his stint on Shade and began working for Marvel Comics. He then illustrated the first three issues of Ghost Rider 2099, one of in a line of series reinventing popular Marvel characters in the year 2099. He also drew a cover for Runaways.

However, he was soon assigned to create a new junior team of X-Men with Uncanny X-Men writer Scott Lobdell. The group Lobdell and Bachalo created, Generation X, was purposely bizarre and idiosyncratic because the two wanted to avoid the recent trend in superhero teams, where each team member represented a recognizable stock character.

Generation X became a hit with the series’ namesake due to Lobdell’s realistically cynical and emotionally immature teen characters and Bachalo’s atypical artwork. Bachalo illustrated the series through much of its first three years, taking a break in late 1995 and early 1996 to illustrate the second Death miniseries, Death: The Time of Your Life.

During his time on Generation X, Bachalo’s artwork underwent a change. Heavily influenced by Joe Madureira, Bachalo's characters became more cartoony and manga-like, with large eyes, heads and hands. He gravitated towards extremes in anatomy, drawing characters that were previously portrayed as bulky, short, or thin as even more so.

In 1997, Bachalo left Generation X for Uncanny X-Men, arguably the comic book industry’s most popular title, remaining until the end of 1998.

In 2000, Bachalo launched Steampunk, a comic book series inspired by the genre of fiction of the same name, which emulates early science fiction and in an alternate version of the early 1900s. The series is written by Joe Kelly and is part of Image Comics’ imprint for creator-owned series, Cliffhanger. The series was criticized for Bachalo's overly detailed pencils, small panels and muddy dark coloring, which sometimes made it difficult to discern what was happening. Similarly, Joe Kelly's writing was not as straightforward as a mass audience typically preferred. Contrarily, the book's supporters praised it for those same reasons, as well as for the sheer imagination of the characters and story. The series, intended to be 25 issues, ended prematurely after the second story arc in issue #12. It is currently available in two reprinted trade paperbacks, Steampunk: Manimatron (ISBN 1-56389-762-8) and Steampunk: Drama Obscura (ISBN 1-4012-0047-8).

When Richard Friend inks Chris Bachalo's pencils, the piece is signed “Chrisendo”, a portmanteau of the names “Chris”, “Friend”, and “Bachalo”.

In the early 2000s, Bachalo completed occasional work on various X-Men series, including Ultimate X-Men, Ultimate War, Grant Morrison's New X-Men (collected in New X-Men vol. 5: Assault on Weapon Plus) and the sequel to the Age of Apocalypse crossover.

Bachalo was also the artist on Captain America for 6 issues (21–26, running December 2003–May 2004 cover dates) pencilling a divisive run written by Robert Morales. In an attempt to humanize Steve Rogers, the pair managed to split fans opinions fairly resoundingly with both leaving the title - Morales 10 issues short of his intended contract for the series.

From 2006 to 2008, Bachalo was the artist for the X-Men title along with new writer Mike Carey after completing his final story arc for Uncanny X-Men (#472–474). He was often filled-in for by artist Humberto Ramos, however.

Bachalo has also pencilled (and coloured) a number of cards for the Vs. collectible card game. These have been renditions of both Marvel and DC characters.

On top of his continuing work for Marvel, Bachalo finished issue #7 of Comicraft's Elephantmen, an issue 4 years in the making. The issue was done entirely in double-page spreads and marks his reunion with Steampunk writer Joe Kelly. The issue's story, “Captain Stoneheart and the Truth Fairy” also represents Bachalo's first work outside Marvel and DC since his fill-in issue of Witchblade.

Bachalo has also been one of the four artists who was originally part of the Spider-Man Relaunch. Brand New Day, along with Phil Jimenez, Steve McNiven and Salvador Larroca.

Starting with New Avengers #51, Bachalo will provide variant covers for the creative team of Brian Michael Bendis and Billy Tan to bring use the "Who will be the next Sorceror Supreme?" storyline.

Antonio Fabela is a regular colorist of Bachalo's work.
Source: Wikipedia
Chris Bachalo art
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G W Backhouse biography

G W Backhouse biography

Geoffrey William Backhouse (16 November 1903 - 1 August 1978; b. Holywell, Flintshire, Wales)
In 1927, Backhouse began drawing Strongheart the Magnificent for Comic Life, the comic strip adventures of a magnificent German Shepherd modelled on a canine Hollywood film star. Strongheart, one of the earliest adventure strips to regularly appear in British comics, continued his adventures when Comic Life was relaunched as My Favourite and would continue to appear, drawn by a number of different artists, until 1949.

Shortly before the war, Backhouse drew The Stolen King for Comic Cuts and Buffalo Bill for Butterfly. After the war, Backhouse illustrated a number of books for Collins, including Mr. Mole's Circus by Douglas Collins and a number of books by Denis Cleaver, including Pongo the Terrible, On the Air, On the Films and A Dog's Life, which featured the adventures of two dogs named Pongo and Peter. Backhouse's association with Collins also included illustrations for The Children’s Picture Dictionary (1951) and modern editions of Alice In Wonderland and Enid Blyton’s Shadow the Sheepdog.

Backhouse’s expertise at drawing animals and nature made him the perfect choice to draw a colourful feature strip starring George Cansdale for Eagle in 1954, following Cansdale's trips around the countryside, and the adventures of Tammy the Sheepdog for Swift (1955-58). Backhouse subsequently contributed many wildlife illustrations to Look and Learn and Treasure, appearing in the former from 1962 onwards. Some of his most notable contributions were for a series of short animal stories written by F. St. Mars, Alan C. Jenkins and F. G. Turnbull that appeared in 1967-68. He died in Tollington Park, London N4, in 1978.
Source: Steve Holland.
G. W. Backhouse art
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Jim Baikie biography

Jim Baikie biography

Jim Baikie
Baikie began his career illustrating Valentine for Fleetway. Over the next twenty years, he built a solid reputation working for TV comics such as Look-in, including adaptations of The Monkees and Star Trek, all scripted by Angus P. Allan.

Baikie also worked extensively in girls' comics such as Jinty. In the 1980s, he drew The Twilight World in Warrior.

In Britain, he is probably best known for collaborating with Alan Moore on Skizz, a reworking of the film E.T.. Baikie was so attached to the character that he went on to both write and illustrate Skizz II and Skizz III for 2000AD. 2000 AD spin-of Crisis also saw Baikie produce the art for the New Statesmen story.

Baikie has also worked extensively in the United States, on superhero strips such as Batman and The Spectre. A new collaboration with Alan Moore also appeared in the guise of the First American.
Jim Baikie art
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Robert Bailey biography

Robert Bailey biography

Robert Bailey
World renowned artist, Robert Bailey, trained at Longton College of Art in England during the 1960s. He only just squeaked through with an ‘E for effort' rating at the bottom of a class of 36 students. There followed various careers in photography, journalism and television. The latter was shooting television commercials on film and hosting a children's television show. He then entered the field of aviation art, and became known worldwide in the genre for creating oil paintings of military action and having the veterans sign lithographs made from them.

Movie producer George Lucas came across Robert's aviation art website and asked him to work on Star Wars. After meeting with George at Skywalker Ranch, Robert's career took on a new twist…Star Wars and other movies. Lucas was sufficiently impressed by Robert's work to purchase originals for his private collection. Robert has gone on to create similar work for sale at comic conventions.

His favorite characters are C3PO and Yoda, although he recreates the full spectrum of Star Wars characters in pencil. He is now retired from oil painting but finds that pencil is more fluid and scenes can be created far faster this way. The number of fans at Comicons who purchase Robert's original movie creations has increased in leaps and bounds over the past four years, and he loves to meet all of the fans who attend.

Besides being a licensed Star Wars and Disney artist, Robert is now also licensed for Marvel characters, after having been approached by the Marvel licensor. Characters are mostly The Avengers and Spider Man. Stan Lee, creator of Spider Man, says that Robert is his favorite artist. Besides all these movies and characters, Robert is also creating panels for Breaking Bad, Frozen, Harry Potter, Princess Bride, Games of Thrones, Depicable Me, Tinker Bell and Indiana Jones. Celebrities who have collected Robert's work include George Lucas, Linda Hamilton, Carrie Fisher, Mads Mikkelsen, Sigourney Weaver, Carrie Elwes, David Prowse, Ian McDiarmid and Anthony Daniels.
Source: Robert Bailey
Robert Bailey art
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Bill Baker biography

Bill Baker biography

Bill Baker
Bill Baker is something of a mystery artist. Although it is possible to track his work through various comics over a twenty-year period, very little is known about the artist himself. He first appears with one-off stories in Top Spot, followed by a brief serial, New Rider at Clearwater, and illustrations for Girl in 1960-64. He remained active in girls' papers for the next decade, contributing to Tina (Two on Cockatoo) Princess Tina (Life with Tina), June (Call Me Cupid, Wedding in the Family) and Pixie Annual.

In 1974 he produced his first literary adaptation for Look and Learn, based on Jack London's The Call of the Wild. This was followed in quick succession by The Sea Wolf (London, 1974-75), 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne, 1975), Don Quixote (Miguel de Cervantes, 1975), The Prince and the Pauper (Mark Twain, 1976), Moby Dick (Herman Melville, 1977), Westward Ho! (Charles Kingsley, 1977), A Tale of Two Cities (Charles Dickens, 1977-78) and King Solomon's Mines (H. Rider Haggard, 1978).

It was during the publication of the latter – in August 1978 – that Baker disappeared from the pages of Look and Learn, the strip taken over with episode nine by C. L. Doughty. Taken from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Bill Baker art
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James Bama biography

James Bama biography

James Bama (born 28 April 1926; USA)
James Bama is an American artist whose work encompasses two major strands: his Western paintings and what can be described - but not dismissively - as pulp art. To the collector, his name is inextricably linked with the adventures of Doc Savage and the paperback covers he illustrated during his time as a commercial artist. He then turned to fine art, which proved even more rewarding commercially and raised his status to Artist and earned him comparisons with Norman Rockwell and N. C. Wyeth.

If one theme can be seen through Bama's work it might be described as "one man (or woman) in the wilderness", as his covers often featured isolated single figures, some alone against expansive backgrounds; it is a style that can be seen in such diverse Bama illustrations as Freedom Road by Howard Fast and Groupie by Johnny Byrne & Jenny Fabian (both Bantam) and Dell's edition of Desmond Morris's The Naked Ape.

James E. Bama was born in Manhattan on 28 April 1926, the second son of Benjamin Bama, a Russian-born apron salesman, and his wife Selma, also the daughter of Russian immigrants. Raised in New York City, Bama was inspired to draw by the adventure strips of the time, most notably Alex Raymond's Flash Gordon, Burne Hogarth's Tarzan and Frank Miller's Barney Baxter. His father died of a stroke when Bama was 13, and his mother suffered a debilitating stroke the following year; Bama had to cook and clean and began earning money, making his first $50 sale, a drawing of Yankee Stadium, to The Sporting News at the age of 15.

He graduated from the High School of Music and Art and enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps' Eastern Flying Training Command unit in 1944, where he worked as a mechanic and physical training instructor, as well as painting murals. On his discharge, he used the GI Bill to enrol at the Art Students League, where he was learned drawing and anatomy under Frank J. Reilly.

After freelancing briefly - his first sales including Western paperback covers A Bullet for Billy the Kid by Nelson C. Nye (Avon, 1950) and Dead Sure by Stewart Sterling (Dell, 1950).

He became known epecially for the 62 covers he painted for Bantam Books' reprints of Doc Savage pulp magazine stories. Clark Savage Jr had been the star of 181 full-length adventures in the pages of Doc Savage Magazine (1933-49), 159 of them written by prolific pulpster Lester Dent.

Bama gave Doc a buzz cut, replacing the kiss-curl of his pulp days, and beefed him up, using Steve Holland, a muscular fashion model who had starred in the Flash Gordon TV series in 1954-55, as the basis for his vision of Doc Savage. The books sold incredibly well and all 182 stories were reprinted between 1964 and 1990.

Although much of his early work was Western covers for the likes of Louis L'Amour and Zane Grey, Bama quickly expanded his cover art repertoire to include everything from contemporary novels, thrillers, romances and non-fiction. A small sampling of his work would include A Rage at Sea by Frederick Lorenz (Lion, 1957), Requiem for a Gun by Burt & Budd Arthur (Avon, 1963) and covers depicting James Bond and the characters from Star Trek.

As well as Doc Savage, Bama painted many other covers for Bantam, including King Kong by Delos W. Lovelace (1965) and Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (1967).

Bama then changed tack after first visiting Wyoming in 1966; he and his wife, Lynn, a photographer whom he met in 1963, moved permanently to Cody, Wyoming, in 1968. During this period he transited from illustration to making more personal works, often inspired by his new surroundings. Much of his work was of contemporary Western and Native American subjects; wildlife and mountain men feature against stunning Wyoming backdrops.

Bama is inspired by real inhabitants of the state, visiting reservations and meeting trappers and cowboys; his prices rapidly escalated and, within three years, he was making far more than he had as an illustrator.He also sought inspiration in travel, to China, Mexico, Tibet and Turkey.

Bama was the recipient of the Spectrum Grand Master Award in 1998 and was inducted into the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame in June 2000. His work is to be found in the collections of Clint Eastwood, Nicholas Cage and Malcolm Forbes as well as numerous galleries.

Bama, who has lived in Wapati, Wyoming, since 1971, remains a keen on physical training, regularly doing heavy exercise even in his eighties. He is a keen reader and movie viewer.
Source: Steve Holland.
James Bama art
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Bambos (Georgiou) biography

Bambos (Georgiou) biography

Bambos Georgiou (born December 1959)
Bambos Georgiou (known as 'Bambos') was born in December 1959. Of Greek Cypriot descent, and speaking only Greek, he has said that it was the discovery of comics at the age of four that helped him learn English, although this form of education was not appreciated by some. One English teacher was thoroughly frustrated that he was always reading comics and his collection - with TV21 being his comic of choice - was thrown out by his mother (along with his Marvels and DCs!!). This only led to him becoming more determined to create his own comics.

In the 1980s he could be found creating Ratman fanzines which were sold on Paul Gravette's Fast Fiction table at Westminster Comic Marts. His first professional sales were scripts to Starblazer, Sid's Snake in Whizzer & Chips and He-man and She-Ra for London Editions.

He co-founded Acme Press in 1985 which published Speakeasy, collections of Maxwell the Magic Cat and Power Comics. Before long he became a prolific contributor - lettering and inking especially - for Marvel UK, IPC, Fat Man Press, London Editions, Titan Books, Deadline, A1, Viz and Panini UK.

He has also contributed to US comics with his inking work appearing in Savage Sword of Conan and Marvel Comics Presents (Nick Fury & Shang Chi) and DC Comics The Ray and Doom Patrol. In 2012 he co-founded the on-line comic Aces Weekly with David Lloyd.
Source: The Illustration Art Gallery
Bambos Georgiou art
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Harry Banger biography

Harry Banger biography

Edgar Henry Banger (27 February 1897 - 1968; Norwich, Norfolk, UK)
Edgar Henry Banger (rhymes with 'danger') - or as he was known, Harry Banger - was born in Norwich, UK and was well known for his amazing cartoon illustrations from 1926 and most proficient through the 1930s in which his colourful characters were included in comics such as Rattler, Dazzler, Rocket and Bouncer.

Banger's most famous was Koko the Pup for DC Thompson's Magic, and also Dully duckling which appeared in Sunny Stories through late 40s and into the 50s.

His artwork was also well recognised through Norfolk, being a regular cartoonist for the local papers such as The Eastern Daily Press, Evening News and the Norwich City Football club paper The Pink Un, in which a lot of his tongue in cheek cartoons were mostly Football based. He was famous for the characters Canary and Dumpling featuring debonair characters with a cartoon Canary or Dumpling head in the Norwich city Colours. A lot of his cartoons were monogrammed HB, Bang, or Harry Banger.

He did most of his work from home in his small studio room in the back of the terrace house that he lived in at Wood Street Norwich, with his wife Maud Banger, daughter Yvonne, and sons Ray and Neville.

After leaving school he had sports cartoons published in the Eastern Daily Press, and later began to work freelance for the Amalgamated Press, beginning in 1926 with "Steve Sticket" in Butterfly, "Enoch Hard" in Comic Cuts, and "Curly Crusoe" in Illustrated Chips.

He worked for the AP for the rest of the 20s and most of the 30s, drawing for The Monster Comic, Crackers, Funny Wonder and Jolly, before moving to DC Thomson, where he drew "Koko the Pup" on the cover of The Magic Comic in 1939-41.

From 1940 he worked for Gerald Swan's comics, where he signed his work "Bang", and after the war, for Paget Publications, Martin & Reid and Target Publications until the mid-50s.

He was one of a small group of comic artists based in Norwich, along with Don Newhouse, Roy Wilson and Louis Briault.

He died in 1968 at the age of 71.
Source: ukcomics.wikia.com & Wikipedia
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Severino Baraldi biography

Severino Baraldi biography

Severino Baraldi (born 1930, Italy)
Severino Baraldi was born on 10 December 1930 in Sermide, a small village 50 kilometres from Mantova in the Lombardy region of northern Italy. As a boy, he entertained customers of the local barber by with his chalk drawings on the pavement. He worked as a carpenter, drawing cartoons for a local paper whose editor encouraged him to seek his fortune in the capital of the Lombardy region.

1962-63 was a major era for Baraldi with the publication of Ulisse ('Ulysses'), adapted from 'The Odyssey' by Gino Fischer, Lo Schianccianoci, based on the work by E. T. A. Hoffman, and Ciuffo Biondo, an adaptation of Peer Gynt by Anna Maria De Benedetti. Ulisse and Ciuffo Biono were praised by the reviewer for Radiotelevisione Italiana for their elegant illustrations, which helped to establish the name of the artist who often signed his work with the abbreviation Bar. At the same time, Baraldi was illustrating the story of Marco Polo and, for Milan publisher Casa Editirice, a variety of other books for children.

For seven years, Baraldi was also a prolific illustrator for the British magazine Look and Learn. More recently, Baraldi illustrated biographies of musicians Dvorak and Verdi for a publisher in Taiwan. In all, Baraldi has contributed to over 220 books and produced 7,500 illustrations. The village of Sermide dedicated an exhibition to his work in June 1997. He continued to work for Famiglia Cristiana and Il Giornalino until retiring a few years ago. Now he is content to be be a family man, the father of three daughters and six grandchildren.
Source: Steve Holland.
Severino Baraldi art
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Stefan Barani biography

Stefan Barani biography

Stefan (Steven) Barani
Stefan Barany has proved to be a particularly elusive artist. Best known for his cover artwork for the Sexton Blake Library, he seems to have appeared almost nowhere else, although the cover art from a 1962 issue of Princess Picture Library has been offered by the Illustration Art Gallery.

Barany's first Blake cover appeared on issue 482, Desmond Reid's Murder By Moonlight, in August 1961. Over the next few months he was the main Blake cover artist; a number of titles involved Barany combining images with other artists' work, including one image by Bruno Elettori, but primarily with Angel Badia Camps. His last cover was Lotus Leaves and Larceny, issue 521, April 1963.
Source: Steve Holland.
Stefan Barani art
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Carl Barks biography

Carl Barks biography

Carl Barks (27 March 1901 - 25 August 2000; USA)
Carl Barks was nicknamed "The Duck Man" because of the quality of his work on Disney's Donald Duck. To Barks goes the praise for creating many of the inhabitants of Duckburg, the supporting cast featured in Walt Disney's Comics and Stories for which Barks was drawing in the 1940s.

Carl Barks was born in Merrill, Oregon, on 27 March 1901, the son of William Barks and his wife Arminta Johnson. Although he had a brother (two years older), Barks described himself as a rather lonely child, his nearest neighbour being over half a mile away from his parents' farm. The local school had only eight or ten students although Barks later recalled that it offered a good education. In 1908 the family moved to Midland, Oregon, closer to the railroad, where they established a new stock-breeding farm.

The immediate success of this venture meant that within three years the family were able to move to Santa Rosa, California, where William began cultivating vegetables and orchards. Profits were slim and William's anxiety over their financial difficulties led to a nervous breakdown and the family returned to Merrill in 1913.

Barks completed his education in 1916, in part concluded because he was suffering from a hearing disability; it was in the same year that his mother died and Barks had a range of jobs – farmer, woodcutter, mule driver, cowboy and printer. In 1918 he moved to San Francisco, California, and found work with a small publishing firm.

His early interest in drawing had been developed through a correspondence course, although Barks had only taken four lessons because he had so little free time. Now in San Francisco and, in 1921, married to Pearl Turner, he began selling drawings to newspapers. Despite returning to Merrill in 1923 with his growing family (two daughters born in 1923 and 1924), he continued to submit drawings and sold to Judge and the Calgery Eye-Opener. He was offered the editorship of the latter, a Minneapolis-based cartoon magazine, where he earned $90 a month for scripting and drawing most of the contents. He and Pearl were divorced in 1930 and Barks met Clara Balken in Minneapolis and married her in 1938.

In 1935 he learned that Walt Disney was seeking artists and moved to Los Angeles where he was hired at a starting salary of $20 a week. He worked initially as an "inbetweener", drawing the movements of characters between key poses. In 1937, his success at submitting gags led to his transfer to the story department where he first worked on the Donald Duck cartoon Modern Inventions. Over the next few years he contributed to a number of Donald's cartoons, including the first appearance of Huey, Dewey and Louie in Donald's Nephews (1938).

Barks suffered from sinus problems caused by the air conditioning in the Walt Disney art studio and left in 1942. He had then recently collaborated with Jack Hannah – who also worked in the Donald Duck story department – on a number of comic strips for Dell, Pluto Saves the Ship published in Large Feature Comics and the 64-page one-shot Donald Duck comic Donald Duck Finds Pirate Gold in Four Color Comics, both published in 1942.

Barks relocated to the Hemet/San Jacinto area east of Los Angeles where he set up a chicken farm, which failed. Barks, did, however, establish himself with Dell's Walt Disney's Comics and Stories as both the author and artist of numerous stories. His first story, The Victory Garden, was published in April 1943 and was followed by some 500 tales featuring the Disney ducks, his creations including Scrooge McDuck (1947), Gladstone Gander (1948), The Beagle Boys (1951), The Junior Woodchucks (1951), Gyro Gearloose (1952), Cornelius Coot (1952), Flintheart Glomgold (1956), John D. Rockerduck (1961) and Magica De Spell (1961).

During this time, Barks divorced his second wife and became acquainted with his third, Margaret Wynnfred Williams, known as Gare, who exhibited paintings locally. They married in 1954.

Although Barks' work was published anonymously, his name became known to fans around 1960. He continued to draw strips until 1966 when he retired, although he was persuaded to script stories until the 1970s. He painted in oils and exhibited and sold at local art shows. In 1971, he was granted permission by Disney's Publications Department to paint scenes from his various stories. When fans learned of this, Barks was inundated with requests and had to announce in 1974 that he was no longer taking commissions.

Duck paintings by Barks began to attract large sums at auction and unauthorized prints led to Disney withdrawing permission from Barks. They relented in 1981 following a campaign by Star Wars producer Gary Kurtz and Conan the Barbarian screenwriter Edward Summer. Summer edited Uncle Scrooge McDuck: His Life and Times (1981), a collection of Barks' tales alongside a new story illustrated by Barks with watercolour illustrations.

The ambitious Carl Barks Library was published in 1984-1990, the thirty volumes reprinting every Disney comic strip written or drawn by Barks. Gladstone Publishing subsequently produced the Carl Barks Library in Color (1992-98). Barks appeared at his first Disney convention in 1993 and, in 1994, embarked on an 11-country tour of Europe. A retrospective of Barks' work was first held in 1994 and was shown around ten cities, attracting over 400,000 visitors.

In the 1980s, Barks had moved to Grants Pass, Oregon, close to where he grew up. His wife died in March 1993. Barks survived a further seven years before he also died whilst undergoing chemotherapy for leukemia, on 25 August 2000, aged 99.
Source: Steve Holland.
Carl Barks art
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Ken Barr biography

Ken Barr biography

Ken Barr
Ken Barr is famous for his many covers for Commando comics in the early 1960s and for his many Marvel magazine covers in the 1970s and 1980s.
Ken Barr art
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Les Barton biography

Les Barton biography

Les Barton (8 December 1923 - 20 October 2008; Wareham, Dorset, UK)
A generation of children grew up giggling to comic strips in Sparky and Whizzer & Chips, drawn by my father, Les Barton, who has died aged 84. He was also a prolific cartoon artist, his gags - populated by wide-eyed folk and often signed Lezz - appearing regularly from the mid-1950s in Punch, Private Eye, the Daily Sketch, Daily Mirror and the Spectator.

The character he made his own from the late 1960s was I-Spy, in a serial in Sparky about a special agent whose face was hidden but whose cloak concealed myriad gadgets, used in animated fashion. He also drew Ma Kelly's Telly, about valve-shaped people who masterminded programmes inside a TV set and, for IPC, Harry's Haunted House and Billy Bunter when the regular artists were indisposed. Later, as IPC tried to re-energise the waning comic market with the irreverent Oink! (a junior Viz), he crafted the Slugs, about a punk band.

A founder member of the Cartoonists' Club of Great Britain in 1960, with a then unknown Ronald Searle, he became treasurer for 20 years. Friends and contemporaries included Chic Jacob, Larry (Terry Parkes) and Bill Tidy. He encouraged many young cartoonists to persevere in this most unsecure profession.

Dad left school at 14 and was a dispatch rider with the Royal Corps of Signals as D-day neared. A motorcycle accident led him to retrain as a draughtsman, and as a self-taught artist, he began submitting cartoons to publications in his spare time during a posting to Lagos, Nigeria.

After the second world war he became a process artist for Associated-Iliffe Press, but evenings were spent producing 20 cartoons a week, the first for Reveille in 1949, which earned him a princely £7. He worked as a war artist for the Sun during the Falklands conflict, thanks to a dearth of photos in the early stages.

He worked well into his 80s, having diversified into greetings cards and revisiting his talent for caricature as an on-the-spot artist at corporate events. He loved having an audience, once describing the best as "intelligent, well educated and a little drunk".

He is survived by my mother, Dorothy, myself, and my siblings, Lisa, Peter and Samantha.

Les Barton was born on 8 December 1923 in Wareham, Dorset. A self-taught artist, he started work at the age of fourteen as a telegraph clerk. His first published cartoon appeared in the Militant Miner in 1944. During World War II he served as a draughtsman in the Royal Signals and War Office Signals and produced his first regular cartoons for WAM (West African Magazine) when stationed in Lagos in 1946.

After the war Les Barton worked as a photographic retouching artist and commercial artist in advertising, and also drew strips for IPC and D. C. Thomson children's comics - including "Billy Bunter", "I Spy" and "Harry's Haunted House." Barton - who signed his early work "Lezz" - was a regular contributor to Punch from 1954, and his work has appeared in Reveille, Private Eye, Spectator, Oldie, Daily Mirror and the Daily Sketch.

Barton drew political cartoons and caricatures for The Statist in 1963 and 1964, and during the Falkands War in 1982 he was staff war artist on the Sun. He also designed humorous greetings cards for Camden Graphics, Rainbow Cards and Cardtoons. He died in Hayes, Middlesex, on 20 October 2008.
Source: The Guardian & British Cartoon Archive
Les Barton art
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John Batchelor biography

John Batchelor biography

John Henry Batchelor (born 1936; Essex, UK)
John Batchelor (J H Batchelor) has been one of the leading technical illustrators of hardware for five decades. Born in Essex in 1936, and growing up in Leigh-on-Sea during the Second World War, he witnessed dogfights between British and German aircraft in the Essex skies and, even at the age of four, put pencil to paper to draw scenes of aerial combat. The Essex coastline was one of the expected invasion points in Hitler's planned attack on a Britain softened up by the Luftwaffe, and Batchelor's early years were spent surrounded by fascinating military hardware, from tanks to machine guns. By the age of seven he could strip and reassemble a .303 Lewis machine gun and draw its constituent parts.

He left home at 16, travelling for two years before performing his National Service with the R.A.F. Batchelor began drawing for the technical publications of Bristol Aircraft Co., Martin-Baker Aircraft Co. and Saunders-Roe Ltd. One of his last jobs for Saunders-Roe was on the plans for a nuclear-powered version of the (ultimately cancelled) ten-engined Princess flying-boat.

In the early 1960s he turned freelance, contributing to Model Maker and Model Cars. Some of his earliest drawings were cutaways for the Eagle comic; in all he produced 44 episodes (making him the joint fourth most prolific contributor). His illustrations also appeared in Ranger and Tell Me Why. He also worked for the far more prestigious markets, including Time-Life Books, which led to his involvement in one of the most ambitious projects in publishing history: Purnell's History of the Second World War. Launched in 1966 under the overall editorship of Sir Basil Liddell-Hart, this massive partwork--for which Batchelor producing a total of 1,163 illustrations--had sold 10 million copies by 1976. To celebrate this momentous achievement, Batchelor was presented, by Douglas Bader, a solid silver model of a British Saladin armoured car from his grateful publisher.

He continued his association with Purnell as they launched History of the First World War and Encyclopedia of Modern Weapons and Warfare, which added to a total of almost 20 million copies sold. Many of the illustrations were reprinted in book form during the 1970s (the bibliography below is likely to be incomplete) and has also illustrated a wide range of other books--and continues to do so. He has also drawn countless illustrations for the American magazine, Popular Science and has had his paintings exhibited around the world.

Since the mid-1980s, he has also produced artwork for postage stamps via the Crown Agency for 40 countries around the globe, including many for the British Commonwealth. In 2003 he launched his own company, Publishing Solutions, to reprint selections of his work.
Source: Steve Holland
John Batchelor art
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H M Bateman biography

H M Bateman biography

Henry Mayo Bateman (15 February 1887 - 11 February 1970)
H M Bateman was a British humorous artist and cartoonist.

H. M. Bateman was noted for his "The Man Who..." series of cartoons, featuring comically exaggerated reactions to minor and usually upper-class social gaffes, such as "The Man Who Lit His Cigar Before the Royal Toast", "The Man Who Threw a Snowball at St. Moritz" and "The Boy Who Breathed on the Glass at the British Museum."

He was born in the small village of Sutton Forest in New South Wales, Australia. His parents were Henry Charles Bateman and Rose Mayo. His father had left England for Australia in 1878 at the age of 21 to seek his fortune, then returned to England briefly in 1885 before going back with an English wife. Soon after Henry was born, his strong-willed mother insisted that they return to London 'and civilisation'. He had one sister, Phyllis, three years younger.

Henry was always drawing from an early age, consistently producing funny drawings that told stories. He was inspired by comics, and he had a keen critical eye, and was enthusiastically drawing at every available moment. At the age of fourteen he had already decided that he would draw for publication. In 1901, the cartoonist Phil May, in response to a letter from Rose, showed interest in his drawings, and that year he was inspired by an exhibition of black-and-white art at the Victoria and Albert Museum. His father had initially decided that his son should follow him into business, but eventually, after many arguments between him and Rose, his father financed his study at the Westminster School of Art which he commenced at the age of sixteen. He did well, but was bored by the lifeless "life" classes and after qualifying at Westminster transferred his study to the New Cross Art School (now the Goldsmith Institute). He also did some practical work at the studio Charles van Havenmaet.

Bateman's first solo exhibition in 1901 was at the Brook Street Gallery, Mayfair. His first contract was in 1904, for ten drawings and two illustrations in a fourpenny monthly magazine called The Royal. At the age of 17, his style was already that of a mature artist. He then progressed to a contract with The Tatler and many other magazines besides, including the Illustrated Sporting News and Dramatic News and Pearson's Weekly. Bateman greatly influenced the style of American cartoonist Harvey Kurtzman.

Bateman was chosen by art instructor Percy V. Bradshaw as one of ther artists to illustrate "The Art of the Illustrator", a celebrated collection of twenty portfolios demonstrating six stages of a single painting or drawing by twenty different artists and published in 1918.

He married Brenda Collison Wier and they had two children, Diana and Monica, both of whom became artists. They lived at Curridge, just north of Newbury, Berkshire.

In later life, he carried on an increasingly acrimonious battle with the Inland Revenue. His final years were spent on the island of Gozo. A centenary celebration of his work was exhibited at Festival Hall on London's south bank in 1987. An English Heritage blue plaque, unveiled in 1997, commemorates Bateman at 40 Nightingale Lane in Clapham.
Source: Wikipedia
H M Bateman art
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Terry Bave biography

Terry Bave biography

Terry Bave (born 1931; UK)
One of the stalwarts of British humour strips, Terry Bave retired in 2007 to enjoy some well-earned rest after worked in comics for 40 years. Bave's clear, unfussy humour strips were to be found in great numbers – he worked on six or seven characters at any one time – in Fleetway's humour comics in the 1970s, '80s and '90s.

Terence H. Bave was born in Bristol, Gloucestershire, in 1931. Inspired by American films and comics, which Bave sought out at newsagents selling American newspapers, he began drawing at an early age. His general education was disrupted by family moves and being twice evacuated during World War II. Bave estimated he attended eleven schools in as many years.

Returning to London in 1945, Bave took on full time work as a clerical assistant at the Post Office Savings Bank. One day a week he attended the Brook Green Day Continuation School until he was sixteen. It was here that he met Sheila Newton, who subsequently also worked at the Post Office bank.

From filling the margins and covers of his exercise books to posting regular topical cartoons on the Post Office bank notice board, Bave decided to turn his artistic inclinations into a career. At the age of seventeen he joined the Colonial Survey Department as a trainee cartographer, drawing maps with the aid of aerial photography. His first published cartoon was in the department’s magazine, The Drum.

Bave’s combined interest in films and cartoons led to his first professionally published cartoons in the pages of the film magazine Picturegoer and the home movie magazine The Pathescope Gazette. With this success in specialist magazines, Bave sought out others and, by the late 1950s, was also publishing regularly in Do-It-Yourself, TV Times, Fire! and Scooter. In a year, Bave could earn £100 from his cartoons. By then, he had joined a firm of commercial map makers but was contemplating another move. A commission to draw a cartoon design for a dog ointment carton led to an offer of work as a packaging designer for Stable Cartons Ltd.; Bave later moved to C. H. G. Jourdan Ltd. where he successfully designed fancy packaging during the heady days of the psychedelic sixties. At the same time, he became the art editor of The 9.5 Review, put together by enthusiasts of home movies following the demise of The Pathescope Gazette.

In 1967, and still keen to work in comics, Bave targetted Wham!, a recently-launched comic published by Odhams Press. Invited to meet editor Albert Cosser at the publisher’s Long Acre office, he was offered the opportunity to take over the strip Sammy Shrink, about a nine-inch-tall boy with normal-sized parents, which was languishing in the lower regions of the popularity charts.

Bave and his wife created their own character, Baby Whamster, a half-pager which they also scripted; he proved immediately popular as a mascot for Wham! and Baby Smasher was added to the line-up of Wham!’s sister paper, Smash!.

Bave was determined to make a go of comics and used every opportunity to learn more about what his audience wanted, particularly by involving himself in the school attended by his son, Russell (born in 1959). He helped with the school magazine, performed as a ventriloquist at school fetes and wrote a school play.

With the addition of work for annuals and worked sourced locally (including posters, letterheads, leaflets, display advertising, cartoons, etc.), Bave was able to turn freelance. However, Wham! was soon to be merged with Pow!, which promptly folded a few months later. Bave found work on annuals via King Leo Studios but that had all but dried up when the Baves received a letter from Jack Le Grand offering them work on a new paper. This was Whizzer & Chips, a title unlike any other on the market in that it was two comics in one.

Bave created some thirteen possible strips and was invited to write (with Sheila) and draw however many he could reasonably cope with on a weekly basis. Thus, when Whizzer & Chips debuted on 18 October 1969, it featured six strips by Bave: the full-page Me and My Shadow, Ginger’s Tum, Hetty’s Horoscope and Aqua Lad, plus half-pagers Puddin’ Tops and Karate Kid to which Nipper was soon added.

Of these, “Me and My Shadow”, in which young ‘Smudger’ Smith is in constant battle with his own shadow, “Puddin’ Tops”, a brother and sister named after their pudding-top hairstyles, and “Karate Kid”, inspired by their son’s taking up of judo lessons, lasted until the mid-1970s.

One of Bave’s rejected ideas, Eager Beavers, was picked up by Buster, where it ran for eighteen months. The new comic Cor!! included Bave’s Donovan’s Dad and Andy’s Ants. In 1970, Bave and his family moved to a bungalow in Bembridge, on the Isle of Wight, where he and Sheila were to live for over forty years.

Promotional issues often involved creating new characters, and Bave’s creativity gave Whizzer & Chips Jimmy Jeckle and Master Hide, The Scarey’s of St. Mary’s and, most successfully, The Slimms in Cor!!, which capitalised on the contemporary slimming craze – although the portly Mum and Dad in the story had no desire to slim; it was their son, Sammy, who tried different ways each week to help them stick to diets or get some exercise. When Cor!! folded in 1973, the strip moved to Whizzer & Chips where it ran until 1979.

Another ‘two-in-one’ comic, Shiver &Shake, featured the spider Webster and, after a ghosting the strips on occasion, took over the lead characters of both sections, “Shiver” the ghost and “Shake” the elephant. New for Knockout was My Bruvver, in which poor Len is stuck each week with his tearaway younger brother, the little’un. Sammy Shrink was revived in Knockout before transferring to Whizzer & Chips and Bave also took over Desert Fox in Shiver and Shake and Odd Ball in Whizzer & Chips, the latter about a ball that could stretch and morph into any shape. Truly odd, it proved to be one of Bave’s longest-running strips, surviving in Whizzer & Chips until 1990.

The launch of Whoopee in 1974 brought with it two new Bave creations, Toy Boy (who, as his name implied, loved toys) and Stoker, Ship’s Cat, a hungry cat in the mould of Ginger. Other cat characters from Bave’s pen included Police Dog and Cat Burglar (Whizzer & Chips, 1975) and Scaredy Cat (Krazy, 1976-78). 1978 saw the creation of Calculator Kid for Cheeky Weekly but the late 1970s saw the merging of various papers, leaving Bave contributing only to Whizzer & Chips, Whoopee and various annuals and summer specials as the decade turned. Barney’s Badges (Wow!, 1982-83), Good Guy (Buster, 1983) and the feature Top Class Comics (School Fun, 1983-84) kept Bave busy.

The latter half of the 1980s saw fewer new releases from Fleetway, although Bave continued to contribute new characters, including Pete’s Pop-Up Book (Buster, 1985-88), Double Trouble (Nipper, 1987, Buster, 1987- ), Mighty Mouth (Nipper, 1987; Buster, 1987-90), Melvyn’s Mirror (Buster, 1990), The Figments of Phil’s Imagination (Buster, 1991-94) and Imagine (Buster, 1991).

Fleetway’s line of humour titles shrunk further, Whizzer & Chips finally merging with Buster in 1990 and Buster becoming a fortnightly in 1995, eventually folding in 2000. By then, Bave had established himself with rivals D. C. Thomson, ghosting a number of strips – including ‘Number 13’ and ‘Bash Street Kids’ for Beano before taking over ‘Winker Watson’ in Dandy (1991-2002). Over the next few years, Bave’s creations included ‘The Great Geraldoes’ (Beano, 1992-93), ‘Buster Crab’ (Dandy, 1998), ‘Inspector Horse and Jockey’ (Beano, 1999-2000 – a parody of Inspector Morse) and ‘Baby Herc’ (Dandy, 2003). From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Terry Bave art
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Leo Baxendale biography

Leo Baxendale biography

Leo Baxendale (27 October 1930 - 23 April 2017; UK)
Leo Baxendale has been one of the few artists in Britain to advance humour strips in the past sixty years. His work has been frenetic and violent at times, subtle and thought-provoking at others. No other artist has argued the case of humour in British comics as strongly as Baxendale and few (if any) have the credentials to back up their arguments so soundly.

Born in Whittle-le-Woods, Lancashire, on 27 October 1930, Baxendale had a grammar school education; as an artist he was self-taught. Between 1949 and 1950 he served with the catering corps. of the R.A.F., after which he worked as a staff artist for the Lancashire Evening Post, drawing sports cartoons, editorial illustrations, adverts and his own series of self-written articles.

Inspired by David Law’s Dennis the Menace, he submitted work to D.C. Thomson's The Beano, a comic he had read as a child, and was immediately accepted, his first original character appearing in 1953, Little Plum your Redskin Chum, followed shortly afterwards by Minnie me Minx, intended as a female counterpart to the popular Dennis. His third Beano set was the single panel "When the Bell Rings", later to become a full-page strip under the title The Bash Street Kids, Baxendale's first strip to introduce a team of characters.

The atmosphere of total mayhem that Baxendale was developing was certainly at odds with the traditional humour strip, particularly those of the Amalgamated Press, Thomson's main rivals. A contemporary of Baxendale's, Ken Reid, was similarly minded, and The Beano was unrivalled for humour at that time. Baxendale also drew The Banana Bunch for Beezer from its first issue, and would later create The Three Bears for Beano in 1959.

Ten years of tremendous output for relatively little reward left Baxendale suffering from exhaustion and depression, and after contracting pneumonia he left the firm following an invitation from Odhams Press to create a new humour title; this Baxendale did, and Wham! appeared in 1964 with a whole army of new Baxendale creations from General Nit and his Barmy Army, Georgie's Germs and The Tiddlers to Biff and the full-colour double-page Eagle-Eye, Junior Spy.

Most of the strips were passed on to other artists to continue after the first issue, and Baxendale even succeeded in tempting Ken Reid from Thomson's. Such was the success of the title that Smash! was created as a follow up for which Baxendale created Bad Penny, The Nerves, The Swots and the Blots and Grimly Feendish.

Baxendale's interest in politics inspired him to publish a weekly two-page newsletter, Strategic Commentary, written by radical strategist Terence Heelas, which he published for two-and-a-half years (1965-67).

When Odhams was absorbed by lPC Magazines, Baxendale continued to draw, taking on full-time some of the strips he had created plus many new creations, chief amongst them The Pirates and Mervyn's Monsters for Buster, Bluebottle and Basher for Valiant, The Lion Lot for Lion, Clever Dick for Buster and Sweeny Toddler for Whoopee!.

Baxendale left l.P.C. in 1975, writing three books featuring Willy the Kid for Duckworth, who also published his autobiography, A Very Funny Business in 1978. Baxendale drew for Eppo in Holland whilst preparing a case against Thomson's for recognition as creator of his many Beano characters which had continued under various different artists. The case finally came to a mutually agreeable but undisclosed settlement in 1987 after seven years. Baxendale celebrated the result with the release of Thrrp! from Knockabout, his first work in the UK for 12 years. In 1990 he returned to the comic strip with I Love You Baby Basil, a weekly strip for the Guardian newspaper, which he continued to draw until March 1992.

Baxendale has written a series of books - The Encroachment, On Comedy: The Beano and Ideology, Pictures in the Mind, The Beano Room and Hobgoblin Wars: Dispatches from the Front - published through his own Reaper Books imprint. Most are autobiographical with an emphasis on Baxendale's views of comedy. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Pauline Baynes biography

Pauline Baynes biography

Pauline Diana Baynes (9 September 1922 - 1 August 2008; Hove, UK)
Pauline Baynes was an English illustrator whose work encompassed more than 100 books, notably several by C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien.

Pauline Baynes was born in Hove, Sussex. For a few years she was raised in India, where her father was commissioner in Agra, but she and her elder sister were sent back to England for their schooling. She spent much of her childhood in Farnham, studying at the Farnham School of Art (now the University for the Creative Arts) and eventually attended the Slade School of Fine Art, but after a year there she volunteered to work for the Ministry of Defence, where she made demonstration models for instruction courses. This work did not last long. She was soon transferred to a map-making department, where she acquired skills that she later employed when she drew maps of Narnia for Lewis and of Middle-earth for Tolkien.

Baynes is probably best known for her covers and interior illustrations for The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis, seven books published, one volume a year, from 1950 to 1956 (the first five by Geoffrey Bles, the last two by The Bodley Head). Years later she provided some new illustrations for The Land of Narnia: Brian Sibley Explores the World of C. S. Lewis (HarperCollins, 1998), by Brian Sibley. (According to a School Library Journal review, "the artwork includes full-page illustrations in glowing color".)

When she began work on the Narnia books she was already the chosen illustrator of Lewis's friend and colleague J. R. R. Tolkien. In her obituary for The Daily Telegraph Charlotte Cory described how Baynes and Tolkien came to be associated: in 1948 Tolkien was visiting his publishers, George Allen & Unwin, to discuss some disappointing artwork that they had commissioned for his novella Farmer Giles of Ham, when he spotted, lying on a desk, some witty reinterpretations of medieval marginalia from the Luttrell Psalter that greatly appealed to him. These, it turned out, had been sent to the publishers "on spec" by the then-unknown Pauline Baynes. Tolkien demanded that the creator of these drawings be set to work illustrating Farmer Giles of Ham and was delighted with the subsequent results, declaring that Pauline Baynes had "reduced my text to a commentary on her drawings". Further collaboration between Tolkien and his Farmer Giles illustrator followed, and a lifelong friendship developed ... Later, when she showed him her artwork for a poster featuring Frodo and Bilbo Baggins, the author nodded approvingly and murmured quietly: "There they are, there they are."

Eventually drawings by Baynes appeared not only in Farmer Giles of Ham, but also in The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, Smith of Wootton Major, Tree and Leaf and (after the author's death) the poem Bilbo's Last Song, which appeared as a poster in 1974 and as a book in 1990. Baynes also painted the covers for two British paperback editions of The Lord of the Rings (in one volume in 1973 and in three volumes in 1981) and produced illustrated poster versions of the maps from The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit.

However, Baynes's own favourite among her works was the set of illustrations she provided for A Dictionary of Chivalry, edited by Grant Uden (Longman, 1968), a project that required two years to complete. As a result, she won the Kate Greenaway Medal from the Library Association for the year's best children's book illustration by a British subject. In a retrospective citation, the Library Association calls it "a reference work that details the life and thoughts of knights". As a reference book it is unique among the winning works and only one other Greenaway Medal in almost sixty years has been awarded for the illustration of non-fiction.

Four years later, Baynes was a commended runner-up for the Greenaway, for Snail and Caterpillar by Helen Piers (Longman, 1972).

Baynes also illustrated The Borrowers Avenged by Mary Norton (1982), the fifth and final book in the Borrowers series, following the death of Diana Stanley, who had illustrated the previous four books. Baynes did the covers for a Puffin edition of the entire series issued in the 1980s.
Source: Wikipedia
Pauline Baynes art
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J Beaven biography

J Beaven biography

J Beaven; UK
J Beaven is known to be the artist who created the picture (shown left) of an Elizabethan Theatre used in a 500-piece jigsaw puzzle created in the 1930s by G.J. Hayter & Co, Bourmemouth, England. This picture was also used for a Macmillan Educational poster in the 1960s.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
J Beaven art
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Walter Bell biography

Walter Bell biography

Walter Bell
Walter Bell was an artist of English children's comics. He was able to copy the styles of most of his contemporaries, so he was often assigned too fill in for other artists during the artists' holidays or illnesses. He created some characters of his own when he became a freelancer, working at an art studio and later running a studio himself. After being a soldier in World War I, Bell began his artistic career at the Byron Studios. His first published work was a cartoon in the Daily Chronicle, and he was soon assigned to illustrate Tom Browne's Weary Willie and Tired Tim for Amalgamated Press.

He also did cover illustrations for the weekly Illustrated Chips, until he took over the back-page panel Casey Court for ten years. From then on, Bell expanded his activities and took on a variety of independent weekly comics. He drew Mat the Middy for Merry Moments, Lottie Looksharp for The Golden Penny, The Sporty Boyees for The Monster Comic and Sonny Shine the Page Boy for The Jolly Jester.

In 1922, Bell began working exclusively for Amalgamated Press. He drew Geordie Brown in Funny Wonder and many characters for the Nursery Group, such as 'Children of the Forest', 'Fun and Frolic in Fairyland', 'Bobbie and his Teddy Bears', 'Redskin Chums' and 'Snow White and her Friends'.

From 1930, Bell illustrated seasonal comic books for Newnes-Pearson, including The Seaside Comic, Christmas Comic, Holiday Comic, Spring Comic and Summer Comic. Amalgamated Press was not amused by Bell's contributions to these rival publications and reduced his assignments. Therefore, Bell began drawing for the comic supplements of national and local newspapers. Among his line of characters were Molly the Messenger in the Daily Mail Comic and Jolly Jenkins in the Daily Express Comic.

He eventually moved from newspaper comics to the boys' weekly story department at Amalgamated, where he drew Mike, Spike and Greta for The Pilot, Mustard and Pepper for The Ranger and The Professor and the Pop for Detective Weekly. He also took over George W. Wakefield's Bud Abbott and Lou Costello feature in Film Fun. He later worked for several one-shot comic books at P.M. Productions, such as 'Starry Spangles', 'Jolly Jack-in-the-Box' and his final series, 'Flipper the Skipper'. In his retirement, Bell drew cartoons for his local newspaper, the Barnet Press, until his death in 1979.
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Giorgio Bellavitis biography

Giorgio Bellavitis biography

Giorgio Bellavitis (1926 - 21 May 2009; Venice, Italy)
Giorgio Bellavitis was an Italian comic artist, born in Venice. He began his career at an early age, drawing illustrations for published by Montuoro and vignettes for the weekly Sior Tonin Bonagrazia. When Italy surrendered to the allies in 1943, Bellavitis and his family traveled to Pordenone to join the partisans. He provided illustrations to the Venetian partisan weekly Vento di Montagna, and was also imprisoned several weeks with Mario Faustinelli and Alberto Ongaro.

Shortly after World War II, Bellavitis, Faustinelli and Ongaro began the so-called "Group of Venice", together with Hugo Pratt, Paolo Campari and Dino Battaglia. The group launched the magazine Albo Uragano, which was later renamed to Asso di Picche. Bellavitis first comic was 'Robin Hood e gli Allegri Compagni della Foresta', that he published under the pseudonym George Summer in Asso Uragano. Bellavitis also worked with Pratt and Faustinelli on the title comic, 'Asso di Picche'. When the largest part of the Venetian group headed for Argentina, Bellavitis and Battaglia began an association with the publisher Ave in Rome. He created 'La Strada senza Fine' in Lo Scolaro and for Il Vittorioso, he made 'I Cavalieri del Corvo' (1951) 'Acqua Cattiva' (1952), 'Il Palio di Siena' (1953) and 'Amburgo 1947' (1954).

Bellavitis was one of the first Italian artists to draw for the British market, which he did after becoming art director of the agency Cosmopolitan Artists. He also introduced Rinaldo Dami, whose agency later provided most of the Italian artwork for British comics. Bellavitis himself drew 'Paul English' for Swift, shortly after moving to England. He drew 'Mark the Youngest Diciple' and 'Storm Nelson - Sea Adventurer' in Eagle, 'Rodney Flood' in Express Weekly, 'The Ghost World' in Boy's World and 'The New Adventures of Charlie Chan'. In Italy, Bellavitis's 'Stormer Nelson' stories were later reprinted under the title 'Kid Tempesta' in Giono dei Ragazzi.

Giorgio Bellavitis returned to Italy in 1958 to pursue a career in architecture, and was involved in many conservation and restoration projects in Venice. He taught art history at the University of Virginia in 1973, and in 1979 was Thomas Jefferson Foundation Visiting Professor at the university's school of architecture. He died on 21 May 2009.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia & Illustration Art Gallery
Giorgio Bellavitis art
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Frank Bellamy biography

Frank Bellamy biography

Frank Bellamy (1917 - 1976, England)
Frank Bellamy was born in Kettering in 1917. His early artistic influences were the juvenile comics of his childhood, Rainbow and Chips, and he found the Tarzan strips of Hal Foster and Burne Hogarth much more to his taste than the rather static picture stories that mainly featured in British comics of the 1920s and '30s.

The young Bellamy had long been fascinated by big cats and other creatures of the African plains. One frequently-told story of Frank Bellamy's boyhood concerns a travelling circus that visited his home town sometime during the mid 1920s. After school hours Frank enjoyed wandering around the circus camp gazing at the caged jungle cats and, on this particular occasion, approached close enough to pluck a few hairs from a lion's tail. He kept his prize for years afterwards safely stored in a bottle! Such an act may now be deemed foolhardy – for even a well-fed, caged lion is a daunting target. But it does serve to show the sheer determination that Bellamy possessed, a quality that was, in adult life, to take him to the very pinnacle of his chosen profession.

His early work consisted mainly of spot illustrations for such magazines as Everybody’s Weekly and Outspan Magazine. His interest in ‘The Dark Continent’ was to the fore in both of these publications with an illustration to “King Solomon’s Mines” in the former and a number of African-related illustrations in the latter. Another magazine that made use of his talents early on in his career was the Boys' Own Paper.

After an inauspicious spell in advertising (Gibbs toothpaste), Bellamy’s big break as a strip artist came when he was offered the opportunity to work on Mickey Mouse Weekly, the prestigious photogravure comic published by Odhams. He left Norfolk Studios and went freelance. His main contribution to the comic was Monty Carstairs, an upper-crust adventurer whose exploits had been appearing in the comic since February, 1951.

1954 was a landmark year for the young artist, marking the beginning of his long association with Hulton Press. His first work for the publisher was a picture story adaptation of The Swiss Family Robinson for Swift, followed by King Arthur and His Knights, where he progressively used striking double sized frames to depict battle scenes, and Robin Hood and His Merry Men.

When Marcus Morris, editor of Eagle, offered him the opportunity to work on the comic’s prestigious back page, Bellamy was eager to begin. His enthusiasm was, however, tempered a little when he learnt that the work was to be a biographical strip of Sir Winston Churchill, The Happy Warrior. Up to that time the back page ‘historical biography’ had always concentrated on historical figures; to work on the biographical strip of, not only a living person but a great national hero as well, was a rather intimidating task and one that called for a great deal of careful research - as well as tact.

Early in 1959, Hulton Press had been taken over by Odhams and the new owners wanted to see some changes. They decided that Dan Dare, the famous cover character of Eagle, looked too dated and needed a face lift. They wanted someone who would inject a new vitality into the character and asked Frank Bellamy if he would take on the job. Bellamy was uneasy about taking over a character who had been created and nurtured by another artist (Frank Hampson), but during his agreed year on the Dan Dare strip, Bellamy created some stunning pages of artwork that glow vividly with life.

Also for Eagle, Fraser of Africa was one of Frank Bellamy’s greatest successes and it remained one of the artist’s own particular favourites. One feature of the strip that has contributed to its continual appeal is its philosophy of conservation, which was years ahead of its time. This was followed by the fantasy adventure strip Heros The Spartan.

In January 1966, Frank Bellamy began work on a strip version of Thunderbirds, the Gerry Anderson T.V. puppet series that has recently enjoyed yet another successful revival on BBC TV. Anderson's futuristic puppets were incredibly popular in the late 1960s and their exploits were avidly followed by fans in TV Century 21, and throughout the late 1960s and early 1970s Bellamy contributed to many quality periodicals including The Sunday Times, Look And Learn and Radio Times. His work for Radio Times, all featuring the popular character, Dr. Who, is amongst his most sought-after from the 1970s. In 1971 he took over the Garth strip in the Daily Mirror.

Frank Bellamy was a perfectionist who created some of the best colour work ever to appear in British comics. His meticulously-drawn strips were always vibrant and full of life and action. His artwork rarely showed any signs of changes or alterations: he would discard a piece of work and start again rather than resort to process white and paste on patches.
Extracts from Book & Magazine Collector no. 222 by kind permission of the publisher, and authors Norman Wright and David Ashford. Click for the complete biography courtesy of the publisher and authors.
Frank Bellamy art

We also have special limited editions of Frank Bellamy BOOKS including Heros the Spartan, The Complete Adventures of King Arthur and Robin Hood.
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Mark Bennington biography

Mark Bennington biography

Mark Bennington (born 1963)
Professional illustrator with 30 years experience. Successfully published in all of the UK's major comic titles of the past 30 years, including 'The Dandy', 'The Beano', 'Buster', etc.

Mark Bennington first arrived at Fleetway to help fill some pages for a Whoopee summer special. He quickly became one of Fleetway's rising stars working as an artist and a writer.

His early work for Buster included Blub the Sub as well as writing for Tom Paterson's Buster strip, Gordon Hill's Chalky and Mike Lacey's X Ray Specs.

He stuck with Buster throughout the 1990s writing and drawing for The Crazy Characters centre page spreads and Whizzer & Chip's faourite Memory Banks. He was the second to last artist to leave the comic, ahead of Jimmy Hansen and JEO.

He has provided artwork for a variety of blue chip clients including the BBC, Walkers Snacks,Fleetway Publications and DC Thomson. My work has appeared in national and internationally distributed books,comics,magazines and marketing campaigns.

He has also produced work for a number of blue chip clients including: 'Hill and Knowlton International Marketing'..'BBC'..'Walkers Snacks'..'Arsenal Football Club'…
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
Mark Bennington art
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Ted Benoit biography

Ted Benoit biography

Ted Benoit (born 1947; France)
Ted Benoit has, since the 1980s, been a prominent artist working in the ligne claire style made popular in the pages of the Franco-Belgian comics Tintin and Spirou.

Born Thierry Benoit in Niort, Deux-Sèvres, in rural France on 25 July 1947, he studied cinematography at the Institut des hauntes études cinématographiques in Paris and later worked in television. His first comics appeared in 1971 after he joined the editorial team of alternative magazine Actuel.

A fan of Hergé and Edgar P. Jacobs, whose works (principally 'Tintin' and 'Blake et Mortimer') filled the pages of Le journal de Tintin, Benoit shared his enthusiasm with other artists who were based around the Pigalle neighbourhood of Paris, leading one of its proponents, François Avril, to coin the term "École Pigalle". This "school" of artists -- including Jacques de Loustal, Charles Berberian and Philippe Petit-Roulet -- helped filled the pages of A suivre and L'Écho des Savanes and other popular French comics in the mid-1980s.

Benoit published a number of strips in the mid-1970s, Géranomimo (1974) and Métal Hurlant from 1976. He also began contributing to L'Écho des Savanes after meeting cartoonist Nikita Mandryka in 1975 and it was here that his Ray Banana strips began appearing in 1978.

His first album, Hôpital (Hospital), was published by Les Humanoïdes Associés in 1979, which won the award for best script at the Festival at Angoulême. His follow-up, Vers la Ligne Claire (Towards the Clear Line, 1980), gathering stories from Libération and Métal Hurlant, showed how his style of drawing was evolving from underground to clear line and had an introduction by Joost Swarte, who had coined the term "linge claire".

More one-off stories featuring Ray Banana began appearing in A suivre in 1980, followed by the serials Berceuse électrique (Electric Lullaby, 1981) and Cité Lumière (City Light, 1984), both subsequently published in album form by Casterman. Further stories from A suivre were collected as Histoires vraies (True Stories, 1982), written by Yves Cheraqui.

In 1987, Benoit created Bingo Bingo et son Combo Congolais for Métal Hurlant and Métal Aventures as well as writing (for artist Pierre Nedjar), L'homme de nulle part (Nowhere Man, 1989), the memoirs of Thelma Ritter, Ray Banana's wife. A second volume of memoirs featuring Ritter was co-written by Madeleine DeMille and was to be drawn by François Avril but remains in limbo. (Ray Banana also appeared as a character in Philippe Paringaux's novel L'Homme qui ne Transpirait Pas in 1994.)

In 1993, Benoit was one of the artists responsible for reviving the continuing adventures of Blake and Mortimer, drawing two albums (#13 L'affaire Francis Blake, 1996, and #15 L'étrange rendez-vous, 2001) written by Jean Van Hamme.

Benoit's adaptation of Raymond Chandler's Playback, drawn by François Ayroles, appeared from Denoël in 2004.

He has also illustrated a number of books, prints and portfolios and has also been involved with l'association Le Crayon, whose members published The Naked Crayon in 2010. He has also been involved in advertising, notably for Jameson whisky and Bic. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Ted Benoit art
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David Bergen biography

David Bergen biography

David Bergen
Although a popular fantasy artist in the 1990s, almost nothing is known about David Bergen's career. He was active in the 1970s, illustrating Sphere's H. G. Wells' reprints and the cover for SF Digest (1976), as well as books by Arthur C. Clarke and Samuel R. Delaney. He illustrated See Inside a Space Station by Robin Kerrod (Hutchinson, 1977) and an illustration appeared in The Flights of Icarus (Paper Tiger, 1977). Soon after, he could be found contributing covers to DAW Books in the USA (e.g. Barrington J. Bayley's Star Winds and E. C. Tubb's Incident on Ath, both 1978).

Bergen then seemed to disappear until 1990 when his work began appearing on various Pan fantasy and SF titles as well as the Puffin editions of Ursula Le Guin's Earthsea series. He continued to produce covers until at least 1997 when his work again disappears from sight.

What other areas he was (presumably) active in I have no idea; perhaps the lack of credits in the 1980s is literally down to the lack of credits that appeared on books. There can be no doubt as to the quality of his work and he was twice nominated (1991, 1992) for the World Fantasy Award.

Personal information on the artist is almost zero. I believe he was born in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in 1947 but a search of the internet turns up nothing else (and any search is rather confused thanks to there being a Canadian author (born 1957) of the same name). Taken from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
David Bergen art
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Luis Bermejo biography

Luis Bermejo biography

Luis Bermejo Rojo (born 1931, Spain)
Luis Bermejo was born Luis Bermejo Rojo in Madrid in 1931, although the family soon moved to Albacete. It was in Albacete that Bermejo began his professional career, still in his teens, as an assistant to Manuel Gago, himself only in his early twenties but already recognised as a great talent in Spanish comics.

In 1944, Gago created El Guerrero del Antifaz [Warrior of the Mask], which would run for 668 issues, finally ending in 1966. Bermejo began as a letterer on the series in 1947 but, before long, was allowed to ink pages. With Gago’s aid, Bermejo launched his own series in 1948, creating El Rey del Mar (The King of the Sea) for Editorial Valenciana. Written by one of the top scriptwriters of the era, Pedro Quesada, it ran for 46 issues, over which time Bermejo began to assimilate influences other than Gago, notably Alex Raymond.

Bermejo’s comic work diversified. In 1949 he drew Diablillos (Mischief) for Chicos and, a couple of years later, Polín, Poli y Pol-Pol for the same paper; he drew similarly humorous strips for girls for the woman’s magazine Mariló.

Bermejo returned to Madrid to attend the Academy of Fine Arts at San Fernando, studying under illustrator Carlos Sáenz de Tejada. Bermejo’s schooling meant that a more realistic style and better figurework were on display in over 100 episodes of Aventuras del FBI (Adventures of the FBI), created for Madrid-based Editorial Rollán in 1951 and considered a classic in Spain.

Bermejo moved to Valencia and collaborated with a number of top Spanish writers, including Miguel González Casquel with whom he created Sigur (1954) and Federico Trotamundos for Chicos (1955) and Pedro Quesada on the juvenile adventure series Roque Brío (1956). The latter was an unexpected failure, lasting on 8 editions, but the two teamed up again for episodes of Pantera Negra (Black Panther), launched in 1956 with artwork by José Ortiz and, later, Miguel Quesada.

Bermejo had by now established himself at Editorial Maga, working closely with Gago, Miguel and Pedro Quesada and José and Leopoldo Ortiz. Here he produced his second famous work, Apache, scripted by Pedro Quesada, which he drew for over 50 issues from 1958.

Bermejo was already in demand elsewhere, having produced his first strip for the British market via the agency A.L.I. in 1957 - an issue of Super Detective Library featuring private eye Tod Claymore. Bermejo also contributed romance stories to Mirabelle, Romeo and Cherie in 1957-60. At the same time, he was still a busy artist in Spain, working for Bruguera on a series of literary adaptations: La conquista de los poles, Un yanqui en la corte del Rey Arturo (both published in 1957), Una vida aventurerea (1958), Las aventuras del Club Pickwick and Las aventuras de Pinocho (both 1959).

In 1960, Bermejo began drawing the character John Steel for Super Detective Library. The early stories were fairly commonplace war stories but when the stories switched to Thriller Picture Library, Steel was given a make-over and began featuring in a series of jazz-age, crime noir private eye yarns with Bermejo the main artist.

Contributions to War Picture Library, Battle Picture Library, Air Ace and Commando in 1960-62 firmly established Bermejo in the UK and he went on to draw Mann of Battle for Eagle (1962) and a series of stories featuring maritime adventurer Pike Mason in Boys’ World (1963-64).

To cope with the workload, Bermejo often worked with Matías Alonso and the two worked on a number of projects for Editorial Maga, including Marco Polo (1963), Vida y costumbres de los Vikingos (1965) and África y sus habitantes (1966). At the same time, Bermejo was having his biggest success in the UK when he worked on Heros the Spartan for Eagle, alternating adventures with Frank Bellamy in 1963-66.

Bermejo now had an informal studio set up which was responsible for many strips in the UK, notably UFO Agent in Eagle (1966) and The Avengers in Diana (1966-67).

Bermejo, solo, drew The Missing Link for Fantastic in 1967-68 and contributed illustrations to Tell Me Why, Look and Learn and Once Upon a Time, also painting the long-running fairy tale Princess Marigold for Treasure (1969-71).

Bermejo was a popular contributor to James Warren's horror magazines Vampirella, Creepy and Eerie in 1975-79, notably drawing The Rook. In 1979-81, he drew an adaptation of Lord of the Rings which was published throughout Europe. The recovering Spanish market also meant regular work in Cimoc, Metropol, Baladin, Hunter, Zona 84 and other magazines, as well as adapting books by Isaac Asimov and A. E. Van Vogt.

He worked on the revival of the famous adventure strip El Capitán Trueno (Captain Thunder) in 1986, but turned to painting and was able to retire from comics in the early 1990s. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Luis Bermejo art
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Walter Berndt biography

Walter Berndt biography

Walter Berndt (22 November 1899 - 15 August 1979; Brooklyn, New York)
Walter Berndt was a cartoonist known for his long-run comic strip, Smitty, which he drew for 50 years.

Bernt's job as an office boy at the New York Journal put him in contact with leading cartoonists, as he recalled, "When I was 16, I worked as office boy for Tad, Herriman, Hershfield, Tom McNamara, also Hoban, McCay, Gross, T. E. Powers, C. D. Batchelor, Sterrett and Segar. Not much money but a million dollars worth of experience!

He stayed with the New York Journal for five years, sweeping floors, running errands, drawing strips, sport cartoons and what have you. Then one year with World Telegram. From there to the Daily News in 1922 where Smitty and Herby work for me! Golf used to be my love, but it is now taboo. So now it's a little swimmin' in my pool."

Berndt's first strip, That's Different, drawn for the Bell Syndicate, lasted less than a year. In 1922, he created Smitty, which he continued until 1973, working with his assistant Charles Mueller.

Berndt won the Reuben Award for 1969 for Smitty. He also produced the comic strip Herby from 1938 through 1960.

The Berndt Toast Gang, named in honor of Walter Berndt, is a group of Long Island cartoonists who meet on the last Thursday of each month, as explained by cartoonist Lee Ames:

-- When the Long Island group, Creig Flessel, Bill Lignante, Frank Springer, Al Micale and I got together to work for Hanna Barbera in the 1960s, we decided to have a Finnegan's Bar lunch every last Thursday of the month. During that period, Creig brought Walter Berndt to join us. We fell in love with the cigar-smoking old-timer (look who's talking!), as he did with us. After a couple of years he passed away and left us grieving. Thereafter, whenever we convened on Thursdays, we'd raise a toast to Walter's memory. On one such, my big mouth opened and uttered, "Fellas, it's time for the Berndt toast!" I wasn't trying to be cute at the time, but I'm not displeased that it stuck and we became the Berndt Toast Gang, one of the largest branches of the National Cartoonists Society. --
Source: Wikipedia
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Jordi Bernet biography

Jordi Bernet biography

Jordi Bernet Cussó (born 14 June 1944; Barcelona, Spain)
Jordi Bernet is a Spanish comics artist, best known for the gangster comics series Torpedo and Jonah Hex. He was born in Barcelona, the son of a Spanish comic book artist, Miguel Bernet.

He made his debut in comics at fifteen, continuing his father's humorous series Doña Urraca (Mrs. Magpie) after his death in 1960, under the pseudonym "Jordi". While this could support his family, it did not satisfy his artistic ambitions that were inspired by artists such as Hal Foster, Alex Raymond and Milton Caniff. From 1962, Bernet developed a more realistic style, and took on smaller assignments from Italian and British publishers, until he started illustrating for the Franco-Belgian comics magazine Spirou in 1965.

He drew the series Dan Lacombe with his uncle Miguel Cussó as writer, and created a similar series Paul Foran with writer José Larraz, but due to disagreements over editing decisions by Dupuis, Bernet ended the relationship with Spirou. Turning to the German market, in the 1970s he collaborated with Cussó to create Wat 69, a sexy and humouristic heroine for the magazine Pip, and Andrax, a science fiction series for Primo, which both became successful in Germany.

After the fall of Franco, Bernet returned to Catalonia and Spain and worked for several Spanish comics magazines such as Creepy, Metropol and Cimoc, eventually meeting three writers with whom he would form productive partnerships. With Antonio Segura he created the amazone fantasy series Sarvan, and the series Kraken, depicting a sewer monster terrorizing a futuristic fascist society.

Bernet first collaborated with Enrique Sánchez Abulí on several short stories, collected in Historietas negras. When Alex Toth, after producing two stories of Torpedo 1936 in 1981, decided he did not share Abulí's darkly humorous view of mankind and parted with the project, Bernet was asked to continue the work. This became the beginning of a long-lasting series, which became a popular success and was awarded at the Angoulême International Comics Festival. It eventually formed the basis of its own magazine, Luca Torelli es Torpedo in 1992. Later collaborations with Abulí include De vuelta a casa, La naturaleza de la bestia: Ab Irato and Snake: por un puñado de dolares.

Bernet also formed a creative partnership with the Argentine writer Carlos Trillo, resulting in the sexually explicit series Cicca Dum-Dum, the less lewd and more comical series Clara de Noche, and several one-shots, including Custer, Light and Bold and Ivánpiire.

Bernet's more recent publications include several albums for the Italian western character Tex Willer, and a run of work for the U.S. comics market, including a Batman story, and a trilogy detailing "the shocking origin" of Jonah Hex. Bernet has later continued to work with Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray on Jonah Hex.

American artist Will Eisner described his impression of Bernet's work in an anthology preface:
"Here was a man who was producing pure story-telling art. That is art that uses the kind of minimalism so singular to his draftsmanship that it is actually a narrative device in itself."
Source: Wikipedia
Jordi Bernet art
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John Berry biography

John Berry biography

John Berry (9 June 1920 - 10 December 2009; UK)
John Berry was a prolific and popular contributor to Ladybird Books, his work appearing in 40 titles between 1961 and 1978, notably their "People at Work", "Public Services" and the "Hannibal the Hamster" books by Raymond Howe.

John Leslie Berry was born in Hammersmith, London, on 9 June 1920, his father the foreman on the railway at Hammersmith. His father "skipped" when his son was only 5, and Berry and his sister were raised by his mother on £1 a week. He was educated locally before attending Hammersmith College of Art in 1934. He earned a scholarship to study at the Royal Academy in 1939 but was bitterly disappointed to have his studies interrupted by the Second World War.

He volunteered for the R.A.F. in 1940 and served in the Western Desert and the Middle East. In a holding unit waiting to enter Tobruk, he offered to produce a poster advertising a national day of prayer. When the artwork came to the attention of Air Marshal Arthur Tedder, Berry was seconded to the 8th Army as a War Artist. Some of Berry's paintings were exhibited at the National Gallery and are now in the permanent collection of The Imperial War Museum.

Returning to the UK, Berry found work with a wartime acquaintance, Major James Riddell, who wrote children's and travel books. Berry drew a number of short books published by Riddell as Riddle Books, but his income was primarily from advertising.

Asked if he could draw a tiger for an ESSO oil company campaign by the secretary at McCann Erickson, Berry retorted, Yes, put a tiger in your tank. He was paid £25 for the famous slogan, but spent ten years from 1951 drawing tigers for the campaign.

He was a prolific portrait painter, his subjects including the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh and Lady Astor. He also worked via Harrods, producing portraits of people who could drop off a photograph which he would turn into a oil painting.

In 1951 Berry married June East, a librarian, and the couple had three sons and two daughters. With a growing family to support, Berry produced book covers for Corgi, Four Square, Panther, Penguin and Readers' Digest. In the Sixties and Seventies, he considered the regular work provided by Ladybird Books to be his bread and butter.

At the same time he continued to produce portraits, his later subjects including the Princess of Wales and President George Bush Sr, and illustrations, including contributing to the 'Special Correspondent' series in Look and Learn in 1967.

In 2004, the Simon Finch Gallery hosted an exhibition of Ladybird work by Berry and Martin Aitchison. A show of Berry's work at the NEC in Birmingham followed in 2005.

Following June's death in 1986, Berry married a second time in 1989 to Jessie Showell. He died on 10 December 2009. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
John Berry art
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Alfred Edmeades Bestall biography

Alfred Edmeades Bestall biography

Alfred Edmeades Bestall (1892 - 1986, Burma)
Born in Mandalay, Burma, Alfred Edmeades Bestall (MBE) drew and wrote at least 273 Rupert Bear stories for the Daily Express for 30 years from 1935 until 1965, including 40 stories for the Rupert annuals. He also created the specially drawn endpapers of the annuals, where his imagination was given full expression.


Please note that we also have Rupert Bear art by John Harrold and other Rupert Bear art.
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Alessandro Biffignandi biography

Alessandro Biffignandi biography

Alessandro Biffignandi (1935 - 21 January 2017; Rome, Italy)
Alessandro Biffignandi was one of Italy's finest painters of cover art and illustrations for comics and magazines. He was born in Rome in 1935 and died in Rome on 21 January 2017, aged 81.

He is primarily associated with his decade-long supply of cover art to British war pocket libraries published by Fleetway in the 1960s and his decade plus association with Italian erotic pocket books. His signature rarely appeared, so even in Italy he was little known and only in recent years has his work been celebrated.

He learnt the finer points of drawing at the Favalli studios. In 1960, he settled in Milan, where he started working for many important periodicals and publishers.

From the late 1950s to the early 1960s, he worked through the Milanese art agencies for the French market and for Fleetway in the UK. His covers for War Picture Library and Battle Picture Library are some of his finest paintings.

He painted covers for the pocket publications of the publishing house Lug, such as Nevada, Hondo, Kiwi, Yuma and Rodeo. He also drew some comics for the books, such as 'Flambo', 'Agent K-3', 'Peter Berg', 'John Kine' and 'Rombo Bill'.

In the late 1960s, he worked for the British Fleetway agency, doing painted covers of The Spider. Since the early 1980s, he has mainly been an illustrator and oil painter.
Source: Steve Holland & Illustration Art Gallery
Alessandro Biffignandi art
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Enki Bilal biography

Enki Bilal biography

Enki Bilal (born 7 October 1951; Yugoslavia)
Enki Bilal is one of the leading graphic novelists to come out of Europe in the past forty years. Still very active, he has occasionally left the field for movies, but has always returned to create something memorable. Although his work has rarely appeared in the UK (although many of his albums are available in English language translation), his work has been championed by Paul Gravett, who says: "Bilal’s visions reveal a decadent dystopia, overwhelming and baroque, inspired by directors like Andrei Tarkowsky of Solaris and Stalker. His plotting is dense, unpredictable, and really repays close attention. There is also a dark, absurdist humour, from the freakish make-up of politicians and the stripped alien cat Gogol to the world chess-boxing championships."

Bilal was president of the 14th Salon International de la Bande Dessinée at Angoulême in 1987. His exhibitions have included two months at the Grande Halle de la Villette in Paris in 1991-92 and he was asked to illustrate a stamp in 2006.

Bilal was born Enes Bilalovic in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, on 7 October 1951. His Bosniak father was the tailor to Marshal Tito, Yugoslavia's prime minister and, from 1953, president, and his mother a Slovakian. The young Bilal's twin passions were drawing and the cinema, especially westerns, and these were combined in a movie that he starred in at the age of nine. A short film, it concerned two youngsters from rival gangs who wandered around Belgrade, stopping to sketch out battles between cowboys and indians in chalk on the pavements. The film was never completed: Bilal's family moved to Paris in 1960. At the time, families were prohibited from going into exile and Bilal revealed to a teacher at school that he was shortly to be joining his father in France. Fortunately, the teacher had an eye on their apartment and helped hasten the family's departure. Bilal became a naturalized French citizen in 1967.

Five years later, he met the editors of Pilote, René Goscinny (author of Asterix and Lucky Luke) and Jean-Michel Charlier. Goscinny encouraged him to apply his artistic talents to comics. Bilal studied briefly (three months) at the École des Beaux-Artes, at the same time submitting work to Pilote, where his first published story, 'La Bal Maudit', appeared in 1972.

He began contributing science fiction stories regularly, later collected in Mémoires d'outre-espace, Histoires courtes 1974-1977 (Memories From Outer Space, 1978), although he was sidelined into producing pages of topical humor on current affairs and caricatures for the weekly paper.

His breakthrough came when he began working with Pierre Christin. Their early collaborations included Légendes d'Aujourd'hui (Legends of Today), a linked series of dark, haunting tales, La Croisière des oubliés (The Cruise of Lost Souls, 1975; serialised as 'The Voyage of Those Forgotten', Heavy Metal, 1982), Le Vaisseau de pierre (Ship of Stone, 1976; serialised as 'Progress!', Heavy Metal, 1980) and La ville qui n'existait pas (The Town That Didn't Exist, 1977; serialised as 'The City That Didn't Exist', Heavy Metal, 1983), each set in a different town threatened by mysterious forces – military testing, developers and multinationals – which were later collected as Townscapes (2004).

Bilal became associated with the French magazine Metal Hurlant, and its American counterpart, Heavy Metal, where many of his stories appeared over the next few decades. Serials in Heavy Metal – including Exterminator 17 (1979, written by Jean-Pierre Dionnet), the three volumes of Legends of Today, two volumes of the Nikopol trilogy and The Hunting Party (1983) – introduced Bilal to a wider English-speaking audience than most European creators enjoyed.

Bilal's popularity in Europe had grown considerably with the publication of the political thriller Les Phalanges de l'ordre noir (The Black Order Brigade, 1979), about the revenge sought by a group of former comrades from the International Brigade following a terrorist bombing in a Basque village. The book won the 1980 Prix RTL for best adult graphic novel.

La Foire aux immortels (The Carnival of Immortals, 1980; serialised as 'The Immortals' Fete', Heavy Metal, 1981) introduced the character of Alcide Nikopol, who finds himself in a future Paris ruled over by a corrupt, fascist dictator bent on gaining immortality from Egyptian gods travelling in an alien spaceship. Nikopol allows himself to be taken over by a disillusioned Horus. In its sequel, La Femme piège (The Woman Trap, 1986; as 'The Trapped Woman', Heavy Metal, 1986), Horus is trapped in a block of concrete while Nikopol has been admitted into a psychiatric hospital, although their lives are about to become entangled with that of a London reporter, Jill Bioskop. The third volume of this trilogy was published as Froid Équateur (Cold Equator, 1992).

Bilal had, meanwhile, received rave reviews for Partie de chasse (The Hunting Party, 1983), written by Christin, about a group of aging Soviet political leaders who plot the death of a politician whilst reminiscing about their growing disillusion with the Russian socialist dream.

Meanwhile, Bilal had become involved in the film industry as the production and costume designer for La vie est un roman (1983), directed by Alain Resnais, having earlier designed a poster for Resnais' My American Uncle (1980). He was subsequently asked to design a creature for Michael Mann's The Keep (1983) and do graphic research for Jean-Jacques Annaud's The Name of the Rose (1986) and designed the sets and costumes for the show OPA Mia (1990) by Denis Levaillant and the ballet Romeo and Juliet (1991) based on Prokofiev and choreographed by Angelin Preljocaj.

His graphic novels continued to appear, including Los Angeles - L'Étoile oubliée de Laurie Bloom (Los Angeles - The Forgotten Star of Laurie Bloom, 1984) by Pierre Christin, Hors Jeu (Off Play, 1987, by Patrick Cauvin), Coeurs sanglants et autres faits divers (Bleeding Hearts and Other Stories, 1988) written by Pierre Christin and Bleu Sang (Blue Blood, 1994).

In 1989 he directed the futuristic, post-apocalyptic movie Bunker Palace Hôtel, co-written with Christin, where the elite of a totalitarian regime have fled to an ancient underground bunker to escape from rebels; amongst them, a spy (Carole Bouquet) observes the power struggle as they await the arrival of their leader.

Bilal's other excursions into movies have been equally divisive. As the reviewer of Tykho Moon (1996) said: "The film has admirable art direction but no narrative or directional discipline. Like his earlier effort Bunker Palace Hotel, pic seems destined for Bilal fans only, plus a few comic-strip festivals." Tykho Moon was another futuristic thriller, featuring an aging dictator on the verge of death. His soldiers seek out Tykho Moon, who unwillingly donated brain cells years earlier. Tykho – actually an artist named Anikst – suffers from amnesia and is unaware that he is being sought. The film received a Special Mention at the Brussels International Festival of Fantasy Film in 1997.

Bilal returned to graphic novels with Le sommeil du monstre (The Dormant Beast, 1998), the first of four volumes that tell the story of the downfall of a futuristic Yugoslavia split by wars in the 1990s. Three further volumes appeared to make up the Tétralogie du Monstre series: 32 Décembre (December 32nd, 2003), Rendez-vous à Paris (2006) and Quatre? (Four?, 2007).

Stand-alone titles published in the same period have included Un siècle d'Amour (A century of Love , 1999), by Dan Franck, Magma (2000) and Le Sarcophage (The Sarcophagus, 2001). In 2004, his film Immortel (Ad Vitam) was released, based on the first two Nikopol graphic novel (La Foire aux immortels and La Femme piège) with the action transferred to New York. The film was created in CG Animation using motion capture and was again met with mixed reviews that felt it was both inventive and incoherent.

Bilal's recent work has included Animal´z (2009), about a variety of survivors of global warming, Julia & Roem (2011) and Les Fantômes du Louvre (Ghosts of the Louvre, 2012).

The boxing scenes in Bilal's book Froid Équateur (1992) inspired performance artist Iepe Rubingh to organize the first chess-boxing bout – six rounds of chess plus five rounds of boxing – in Amsterdam in November 2003 (which Iepe won). The World Chess Boxing Organization continues to support championship fights of the hybrid sport around the world. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Enki Bilal art
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Harry Bishop biography

Harry Bishop biography

Harry Bishop (born 3 May 1920; UK)
Harry Bishop is one of the finest artists in the UK who has turned his gaze – and talent – to the wild west. For most of his career he drew western comic strips, and it was his work on Gun Law – based on the television show Gunsmoke starring James Arness as Matt Dillon – for the Daily Express for which he is best remembered. With its superb figurework and accurate portrayals of horse and rider, Bishop drew on influences ranging from Tony Weare to Remington Russell and Norman Rockwell. He was awarded the British Cartoonists Award in 1965. He took over the Wes Slade strip in the Sunday Express in 1980 and this also earned him an award from the Strip Illustrators Society in 1981.

Born in Painswick, Gloucestershire, on 3 May 1920, Harry Bishop was a fan of illustrators like D. C. Eyles, Stanley Woods and H. M. Brock and was keen to attend art school, an interest supported by his parents. He was educated at Hatherley School and the Gloucester School of Art, leaving the latter in 1937 to travel abroad.

Bishop served in the R.A.F. during the war – mostly abroad and for some time with Bomber Command – and recommenced his art education in 1947, using his ex-serviceman's gratuity to began studying at Wimbledon College of Art. Graduating in 1952, he took up a position as a teacher at Mitcham Grammar School.

At the same time he began drawing comic strips for the Amalgamated Press, his earliest known work appearing in Comic Cuts, where he took over the artistic chores for the adventures of Cal McCord, the real-life cowboy and actor, in May 1953. Comic Cuts came to a close soon after, but Bishop was to find a regular home for his work in Swift, which was about to be launched in March 1954. His first strip, Tom Tex and Pinto ran for eighteen months, during which time he also took over the colour cover of Swift, drawing Tarna Jungle Boy from June 1954.

After this rapid rise, Bishop found work on Junior Express drawing Wyatt Earp, Red Cloud and Rex Keene, for Thriller Comics drawing Jesse James and for Sun drawing Billy the Kid. Through these strips he established himself as one of the leading western artists in the UK. In April 1957, he began drawing 'Gun Law' for Express Weekly, continuing the weekly strip until March 1961. A year earlier, in April 1960, the strip had begun appearing in the Daily Express. He continued to write and draw the strip for almost two decades.

Bishop continued to contribute to British comics, although often for brief periods only, drawing Smiley! (Swift, 1958-59), Billy the Kid (Lion, 1959), 'Tarna Jungle Boy' (Swift, 1962-63), Morg of the Mammoths (Lion, 1963-64) and numerous one-off features for TV Express, Boys' World, Eagle and Princess. In 1970-85, Bishop was also a prolific illustrator for Deans.

After drawing a second strip for the Evening Standard, Judy and the Colonel, Bishop drew Tarzan and The Saint for TV Tornado and Blackbow the Cheyenne briefly for Eagle before departing comics around 1967. He returned almost a decade later with The Wrangler, a brief one-off in Ally Sloper (1976), which year marked his debut in the Dutch weekly Eppo, where he drew the western Laben Tal until 1977. 'Gun Smoke' ended in 1978.

Bishop brought the 'Wes Slade' series to a close in 1980-81 following the death of its originator, George Stokes, after which he concentrated on painting. He has produced surprisingly few paintings on western subjects, although a 'modest number' (around 30) were sold via Frost and Reed of Bond Street, London; he has, however, painted landscapes and other subjects and worked in most media, although he prefers pen and ink.

In 1984-85, an eye infection caused him to give up painting completely. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Harry Bishop art
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Simon Bisley biography

Simon Bisley biography

Simon Bisley (born 4 March 1962)
Simon Bisley is a British comic book artist best known for his 1990s work on ABC Warriors, Lobo and Sláine. His style, reliant on paints, acrylics, inks and multiple-mediums, is strongly influenced by Frank Frazetta, Bill Sienkiewicz, Gustav Klimt, Salvador Dalí, Egon Schiele, and Richard Corben. He also took inspiration from rock album covers and graffiti as well as traditional comics art. In turn he and his work has inspired various forms in media, including the Beast in the 2006 Doctor Who episode "The Satan Pit", and Simon Pegg's character graphic artist Tim Bisley on the Channel 4 sitcom Spaced.

While still a student, Bisley did a painting of a robot holding a baby that he sent to the offices of 2000 AD. The image was seen by Pat Mills and inspired him to relaunch the ABC Warriors strip, with Bisley as artist, in 1987. Following this, Bisley took over drawing of Sláine. Bisley also painted the intercompany crossover Judge Dredd and Batman, Judgement on Gotham.

As of 1997, Bisley is an occasional contributor to the comics magazine Heavy Metal.

Bisley has done design work for several music videos, including The Chippendales' "Room Service".

More recently (2014-2015), Bisley pencilled the hugely popular graphic novel The Tower Chronicles: DreadStalker written by Matt Wagner.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery & Wikipedia
Simon Bisley art
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Basil Blackaller biography

Basil Blackaller biography

Basil Blackaller (1921 - 1958; Hampshire, UK)
Basil Blackaller was born in Christchurch, Hampshire, in 1921. His comics debut came at the age of 16, drawing "Hairy Dan" in the first issue of DC Thomson's The Beano in 1938. His best known strip was "Pansy Potter, the Strongman's Daughter" for the same title, which he took over from creator Hugh McNeill in 1939 and drew throughout the Second World War.

He also drew "Deep Down Daddy Neptune" (1939), "Cinderella and the Ugly Sisters" (1940), "Big Heep" (1940) and "Smart Alec" (1945) for The Beano, "Castor Oil Craddock" (1948) for The Dandy, and "Dick Turpentine" (1940) for The Magic Comic.

He moved to the Amalgamated Press and switched to adventure strips, drawing for Super Detective Library, in the 50s. He also drew the syndicated science fiction newspaper strip "Ace O'Hara", written by Conrad Frost, in the 1950s, and "Captain Falcon" for Rocket (under the pseudonym "Frank Black") in 1956. He died in Surrey in 1958, aged just 36.
Source: UK Comics Wiki

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Janet Blakeley biography

Janet Blakeley biography

Janet Blakeley
Janet Blakeley was a regular contributor to Look and Learn and was one of their most prolific artists for nature articles in the late 1970s, appearing almost every week.

She also contributed illustrations to Watching Wildlife by Andrew Cooper (London, Usborne, 1982) and the children's novel Alice's Part by Vera Boyle (London, Macmillan Children's Books, 1983). From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Janet Blakeley art
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Michel Blanc-Dumont biography

Michel Blanc-Dumont biography

Michel Blanc-Dumont
Michel Blanc-Dumont started out publishing in Phénix, but eventually joined Jeunes Années, where he illustrated several Indian legends as well as several posters. His actual comics career took off in 1974, when he began the western series Jonathan Cartland with scenarist Laurence Harlé in Lucky Luke Magazine, one of the best western comics series.
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Adriano Blasco biography

Adriano Blasco biography

Adriano Blasco Monterde (1931 - 2000; Spain)
Adriano Blasco is the younger brother of Jesús, Alejandro and Pilar Blasco. He started out drawing harmless humorous characters like 'Chispita' for the girls magazine Mis Chicas in the early 1940s. Since 1947 he was a regular at adventurous weekly Chicos contributing such works as 'Piratas en el Yukon' and 'El genio negro'.

He drew many stories for El Coyote magazine, like 'Pasarse de Listo' and 'Una heroína en Guerra'. For another girls magazine called Florita, he produced such comics as 'Marcela' and 'Lizzy'. In the 1960s, he joined the Blasco studios, where he worked alongside his brothers, Jesús and Alejandro under the only name of Jesús Blasco.
Source: Lambiek
Adriano Blasco art
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Alejandro Blasco biography

Alejandro Blasco biography

Alejandro Blasco Monterde (1928 - 19 October 1988; Spain)
Alejandro Blasco was a Spanish cartoonist and illustrator, famous for the joint work with his brothers Jesús and Adriano Blasco.

As the second of the Blasco brothers, Alejandro Blasco also chose the comics profession. He started out drawing an innocent humorous character called 'Morronguito' for the girls magazine Mis Chicas in the early 1940s. Since 1944 he turned out a series of stories for Chicos, such as 'Dardo Amarillo', 'Por Tierras de Emoción', 'Policía Montada', 'El Ídolo del Lago', and 'Corsario X'. He created 'Gangsters' and 'Una Evasión Difícil' for El Coyote magazine. He also cooperated on Alcotán magazine. He also worked on British comics like 'Billy the Kid' for Sun and 'Buffalo Bill' for The Comet in the 1950s.

Alejandro began his career in 1943 in Mis Chicas, where he already worked his sister Pilar, making the comic strips of the anthropomorphic cat 'Morronguito'. According to Salvador Vázquez de Parga, both his style and that of brother Adriano "accused the influences of Anita Diminuta, the stories of Puigmiquel, and more remotely from those of Walt Disney."

It was successful and in 1945 the hardcover albums titled Morronguito in the river of Pearls were published ".

A year earlier, however, he had begun to collaborate with the magazine Chicos by creating a series of realistic graphics adventures, such as Yellow Dart, Mounted Police, Land of Thrill, The Idol of the Lake, or Corsair X before the magazine was forced to conclude these strips in 1949. He also published in El Coyote and Alcotán.

From 1947 he had begun to work together with his brothers Adriano and Jesús. Ten years later, the three of them set up a studio in a three-storey house in a residential area next to the Vallcarca bridge, dedicated to the production of cartoons for the British and French-speaking markets, always under the signature of the older brother Jesús. They created several comics throughout the 1960s and 1970s ('Steel Claw', 'Los Guerilleros'). Alejandro remained active in the comics field until the late 1980s.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery & Lambiek
Alejandro Blasco art
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Jesus Blasco biography

Jesus Blasco biography

Jesús Monterde Blasco (3 November 1919 - 21 October 1995, Spain)
From November 1954 when his first strip appeared in the UK, Jesús Blasco carved an astonishing path through British comics, producing some of the most popular stories of their times. British strips often played fast and loose with historical facts and physics and grounding them in Blasco’s photo realistic artwork made them believable to their youthful audience. His artwork inspired a generation of new artists, Dave Gibbons and Brian Bolland both acknowledging his influence.

Jesús Blasco Monterde was born in Barcelona, Spain, on 3 November 1919, one of five siblings—brothers Alejandro, Adriano, Augusto and sister Pilar—who, to one degree or another, all worked in comics. Entirely self-taught, Blasco began working professionally in comics shortly after his first prize-winning drawing appeared in Mickey when he was 14. Only 15, he created ‘Cuto’ for Biloche in 1935. The boy hero become one of Spain’s most popular comic creations following his appearance in Chicos in 1940 and Blasco added a second popular strip to his CV when he created ‘Anna Diminuta’ for Mis Chicas.

Blasco was called up to serve during the Spanish Civil War and, after the war, served three years military service whilst still managing to keep up a steady output of comic strips from war stories to nursery tales.

In 1954, he made his debut in the UK and continued to contribute to British comics for over 20 years. From drawing ‘Buffalo Bill’ and ‘Billy the Kid’ in Comet and Sun, Blasco took over the artwork of those most British of heroes, ‘Robin Hood’ and ‘Dick Turpin’. He also turned his hand to fairy tales, drawing beautifully painted spreads for Playhour featuring Pinocchio, the Dancing Princesses, Rumpelstiltskin and others.

In 1962 he drew ‘Vengeance Trail’ for Eagle and, that same year, began work on his two longest-running strips: the darkly menacing adventures of ‘The Steel Claw’ in Valiant and the whimsical children’s fantasy ‘Edward and the Jumblies’ for Teddy Bear.

Thanks to inking help from his brothers Alejandro and Adriano, who did not receive any individual credits in the UK after 1955, the Blasco family were able to turn out an astonishing number of pages each week with no fall-off in quality.

In 1968, Blasco adapted ‘Montezuma’s Daughter’ for Look and Learn and went on to draw further features and stories for that paper and its companion, Treasure. In the 1970s, he also drew the adventures of ‘The Wombles’ and ‘Return of the Claw’, but the market in the UK was no longer able to absorb his output. In 1968 he had drawn ‘Los guerrilleros’, written by Michael Cussó, for Spirou. Now, in 1974, he became more heavily involved in the Portuguese comic Jornal do Cuto and the Spanish comic Chito and his output in the UK fell away. Apart from a few episodes of ‘Dredger’ in Action and the opening three episodes of ‘Invasion’ for 2000AD, Blasco turned his sights to Europe, where he was invited to adapt the Bible as a series of comic strips.

In 1982, Blasco was awarded the prestigious Yellow Kid at Lucca and the French honorary award Ordre des Arts et des Lettres. In 1986 he worked with Victor Mora on reviving ‘El Capitán Trueno’ but the strip was caught up in the collapse of its publisher. Blasco turned to Italy and Bonelli’s long-running western saga ‘Tex’ and science-fantasy ‘Zona X’. He also teamed up again with Victor Mora to recount the historical adventures of ‘Tallaferro’.

Blasco died on 21 October 1995, survived by only one brother, Adriano.

There is an air of total realism about Jesus Blasco's work. Blasco is often almost photographic in the delineation of his characters and, although occasionally this tends towards a rather static look to some frames, his fine sense of composition and sensitive drawing style more than adequately compensates. Born in Barcelona, Jesus Blasco started drawing for Spanish comics while still in his teens. The eldest of five brothers, most of whom are illustrators and who are often engaged in inking his work, he has worked in practically every genre: Historical, Western, Detective, Fairy Tales.

In addition to Thriller Picture Library, he contributed many strips to the Cowboy Comics Library and picture strip versions of two Jeffrey Farnol historical romances for Look and Learn. He drew many strips for Lion, including probably the most celebrated of all his strips in this country - The Steel Claw. Biography extracts courtesy of David Ashford, Norman Wright and Steve Holland.
Jesus Blasco art
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Stuart Bodek biography

Stuart Bodek biography

Stuart Bodek
Stuart Bodik's book cover art appeared on what would seem to be an American family saga, a genre that flourished in the 1970s and 1980s, although it had its roots in such popular novels as The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy and The Whiteoaks of Jalna by Mazo de la Roche.

The late Stuart Bodek was born in South Africa and was represented by Artist Partners in London.
Stuart Bodek art
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Stephen Richard Boldero biography

Stephen Richard Boldero biography

Stephen Richard Boldero (1898 - 1987)
Boldero's cover artwork appeared regularly in the 1950s and 1960s, published by most of the leading paperback firms (Corgi, Digit, Arrow, Pan, Panther, Four Square, Consul). He also had a long association with Souvenir Press, producing numerous dust jackets.
Stephen Richard Boldero art
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John Bolton biography

John Bolton biography

John Bolton (born 23 May 1951; UK)
John Bolton is best known for his painted comic strips, his dark, photorealist style particularly effective on horror stories, in which genre he became somewhat typecast through his work on adaptations of Clive Barker and Sam Raimi's film Army of Darkness and his series of voluptuous she-vampire paintings. Bolton's work in the broader field of fantasy is probably best exemplified by his collaborations with Chris Claremont, which included Marada the She Wolf in Epic Illustrated and the 6-issue mini-series The Black Dragon.

Born in London, 23 May 1951, Bolton trained as civil engineer, then worked as a clothes salesman in London. His first comics-related work came via Granddreams, illustrating annuals such as The Magician, The Lone Ranger, Planet of the Apes, Flash Gordon, New Avengers and Tarzan. His first strips appeared in House of Hammer in 1976, including adaptations of Dracula, Prince of Darkness and One Million Years B.C., and early episodes of the Steve Moore-written Father Shandor series. Switching to colour, he made an immediate impact drawing The Bionic Woman for Look-In. Bolton won the Eagle Award for Favourite Comicbook Artist (UK) in 1979.

His American debut came with Kull, written by Doug Moench for Marvel Preview in 1980. A year later, his first painted strips - The Llehs - appeared in Epic Illustrated followed in 1982 by Marada the She-Wolf. Dozens of short horror tales appeared in Twisted Tales, Alien Worlds, Pathways to Fantasy, Tales of Terror, Alien Encounters and Cheval Noir over the next few years, as did The Black Dragon. Bolton could also turn his hand to mainstream comicbooks, which he did with a run of back-up stories in Classic X-Men in 1986-89 and Wonder Woman Annual (1988).

Graphic novels like Someplace Strange (1988), written by Ann Nocenti, and The Yattering and Jack (1992), adapted from a Clive Barker story by Steve Niles, and his painting of the first issue of The Books of Magic by Neil Gaiman helped cement his reputation as Britain's finest weird-fantasy/horror artist.

He has since gone on to work on many other titles, chief amongst them Man-Bat (1995), written by Jamie Delano, Menz Insana (1997) by Christopher Fowler, Gifts of the Night (1999) by Paul Chadwick, Batman/Joker: Switch (2003) by Devin Grayson, God Save the Queen (2007) by Mike Carey, The Evil Dead (2008) by Mark Verheiden and The Green Woman (2010) by Peter Straub & Michael Easton.

Over the years, Bolton has also published portfolios, illustrated trading cards and worked as a storyboard and concept artist.

A Short Film About John Bolton (2003) was written and directed by Neil Gaiman, although it featured a fictional version of Bolton's life. Bolton is played by John O'Mahony, with Marcus Brigstocke playing an interviewer who discovers, to his cost, what inspires Bolton's disturbing art. Bolton himself had a cameo in the film.

His latest work is Shame: Conception for Renegade Arts Entertainment, released in July 2011; at the time of writing he is working on the second book in a proposed trilogy. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
John Bolton art
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George Bowe biography

George Bowe biography

George Bowe
George Bowe is a bit of a mystery. His career began at least as early as 1948 when he illustrated two books by Enid Blyton and continued until at least 1974 when he drew At the End of the Rainbow'in Bonnie. In between he contributed illustrations to Boy's Own Paper, Pony Club Annual, Robin Annual, Girl Annual and Swift Annual in the 1950s and 1960s.

For an artist with a career spanning at least 26 years, it is surprising that nothing else is known. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Leslie Bowyer biography

Leslie Bowyer biography

Leslie Bowyer
Leslie Bowyer was an occasional contributor to Eagle, illustrating a short story in 1951 and a feature on the Queen's post-Coronation tour of 1954.

He also produced advertising designs and watercolours and contributed to Children's Own Wonder Book (1947). Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Stuart Boyle biography

Stuart Boyle biography

Stuart Boyle; UK
"I was born, grew up and still live in London, England. My father, Stuart Boyle, was an artist. He illustrated a number of books including Evelyn Waugh’s The Loved One." -- Catherine Brighton.

Stuart Boyle painted a number of detailed illustrations depicting scenes from history and used in the Macmillan series of educational posters in the 1960s.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
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Eric Bradbury biography

Eric Bradbury biography

Eric Bradbury (born 1921, England)
Eric Bradbury was born in Sydenham, Kent, but moved to nearby Beckenham at the age of ten where he gained a scholarship to the local Art School in 1936. During the War he was an airgunner flying Wellingtons. Like Geoff Campion, Eric Bradbury began his strip career drawing Our Ernie and other "funnies" characters for Knockout in 1949.

Before long, however, thanks to the persuasion of Leonard Matthews, Bradbury began work on adventure strips. Starting on Knockout's Luck Logan Western strip and, later, as the best of the Campion imitators on the Buffalo Bill strip in Comet, he was soon creating his own strips such as The King's Thief for Comet based on the MGM film - a far more exciting strip than it was a movie!

By the 1960s, Eric Bradbury began to develop his own idiosyncratic, dark, somewhat sinister style, with such strips as Mytek the Mighty and The House of Dolmann for Valiant, Maxwell Hawke for Buster and Doomlord for the new 1980's Eagle. Biography courtesy of David Ashford and Norman Wright.
Eric Bradbury art
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Frank Brangwyn biography

Frank Brangwyn biography

Guillaume François Brangwyn (Frank Brangwyn), (1867 - 1956; Belgium)
Frank Brangwyn was something of an artistic jack-in-the-box, estimated to have produced some 12,000 artistic works in a working career that spanned 65 years and a wide range of media, from stained glass windows and glassware to ceramics and furniture. He also painted murals on buildings, painted in oils, watercolours and gouache, made etchings and wood engravings and was a lithographer.

His work ranged from small woodcuts to a series of murals that were originally intended to be placed in the Royal Gallery at the House of Lords in Westminster but were considered "too colourful and lively" for the location. The 16 large works, painted between 1925 and 1932 and covering some 3,000 square feet, became known as the British Empire Panels and are now housed in the Brangwyn Hall, Swansea.

Frank William Brangwyn was born Guillaume François Brangwyn in Bruges, Belgium, on 12 May 1867. Frank's father, William Curtis Brangwyn, was an ecclesiastical architect who had moved to Bruges to paint murels and frescoes for Belgian churches as well as designing several buildings and reconstructing others (such as the church of Sint-Andries). Brangwyn did not receive any formal artistic training; instead, his father sent him to practice drawing at the South Kensington Museum where he met Harold Rathbone and Arthur Heygate Mackmurdo, who both encouraged his work. Through Mackmurdo, Brangwyn was introduced to William Morris, who employed him as a glazier.

Brangwyn began to develop as a painter and his painting A Bit on the Esk was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1885. A passion for the sea led him to join the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve and he developed a good reputation for his seascapes and landscapes. His oil painting Burial at Sea (now in the Art Gallery and Museum, Glasgow) won a medal at the Paris Salon in 1891. Brangwyn travelled extensively and his first one-man show was entitled 'From Scheldt to Danube'.

Commercial illustrations for The Graphic expanded his audience and his reputation amongst the artistic community was high: he decorated the façade of the L'Art Nouveau gallery in Paris in 1895 and was one of the artists, along with Rodin and Whistler, invited to show his work at the first exhibition of the Vienna Secession group. Between 1902 and 1920 he executed a great many murals for buildings in London, Venice, Cleveland, Manitoba, Jefferson City, Leeds, Taormina (Sicily) and elsewhere. He was made an associate of the Royal Academy in 1904 and a member in 1919.

During the First World War, Brangwyn was an official war artist, designing many propaganda posters. After the war he was commissioned to produce a series of murals for the House of Lords, paid for by Lord Iveagh. The initial designs, depicting battle scenes, were thought too grim and Brangwyn started afresh, using vibrant colours to depict the achievements of Britain's colonies during the conflict. These were rejected by the Royal Fine Arts Commission and Brangwyn was understandably devastated.

After executing another large commission for the Rockefeller Center in New York, Brangwyn became more reclusive and pessimistic, a situation that had begun years earlier and contributed to by the death in 1924 of his wife, Lucy (née Ray, a nurse whom he had married in 1896). Brangwyn began to dispose of many of his possessions; over 400 pieces were gifted to Bruges in 1936 in order to establish a permanent museum in his native city; a substantial collection was also donated to the William Morris Museum, Walthamstow. A museum of Brangwyn and of de Belleroche was established at Orange, France, in 1947.

Brangwyn was knighted in 1941 and a major retrospective of his work was held at the Royal Academy in 1952 - the first living Academician to be so honoured. He died on 11 June 1956 at his home in Ditchling, Sussex, aged 89. Biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Dan Brereton biography

Dan Brereton biography

Dan Brereton (born 22 November 1965; San Francisco, USA)
Dan Brereton is an American professional writer and illustrator who has produced notable work in the comic book field.

Barely out of art school, Dan burst onto the scene in 1989 winning his first industry award for the BLACK TERROR miniseries (Eclipse Comics) and hasn't looked back since. In the last two decades he's produced a prolific body of work in Comics, and has won and been nominated many times for several different industry and fan awards. He has also worked in Animation, TV, Film, Music, Publishing and Theme Parks.

Brereton is known for his skills as a painter and his distinctive character designs. He gained attention for his work on "Batman: Thrillkiller", "Superman and Batman: Legends of the World's Finest", and "JLA: Seven Caskets". His most famous work is his own series "The Nocturnals".

Outside the comic book field, Brereton's work includes the package illustration for a video game called "Machine Head", billboard and advertising art for Rawhide (a Wild West park in Scottdale), concept art for Pressman Films, the television show Numb3rs, development for Disney Television Animation and album covers for the bands Toto, Fireball Ministry, Sote, Ghoultown, and Rob Zombie's Hellbilly Deluxe.

Image Comics published "Dan Brereton: The Goddess & The Monster," a collection of his best work, in August 2010.

Dan lives in California with his family and their many pets. Hobbies include Reading, Movies, TV, Comic Conventions,Pestering Sushi Chefs and Divining Parallel worlds .His favorite hobby, as it turns out, is his job.
Source: ComicBookDB & Wikipedia
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Charles Edmund Brock biography

Charles Edmund Brock biography

Charles Edmund Brock RI (5 February 1870 - 28 February 1938; London, UK)
Charles Edmund Brock was a widely published English line artist, portrait painter and book illustrator from Cambridge, who signed his work C. E. Brock. He specialised in illustrating period books.

He was the eldest of four artist brothers, including Richard Henry Brock and Henry Matthew Brock, also an illustrator. And they all shared the same studio in Cambridge.

Brock was born in Holloway, London. The family later settled in Cambridge. He studied art briefly under sculptor Henry Wiles.

He received his first book commission at the age of 20 in 1890. He became very successful, and illustrated books for authors such as Jonathan Swift, William Thackeray, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and George Eliot. Brock also contributed pieces to several magazines such as The Quiver, The Strand, and Pearsons. He used the Cambridge college libraries for his "picture research".

In illustration Brock is best known for his line work, initially working in the tradition of Hugh Thomson, but he was also a skilled colourist. As a painter he received plaudits for his realism and vibrancy he created in his work. Only a small quantity of his known paintings have been located which is why their prices have been so high.

He and his brothers maintained a Cambridge studio filled with various curios, antiques, furniture, and a costume collection. They owned a large collection of Regency era costume prints and fashion plates, and had clothes specially made as examples for certain costumes. Using these, family members would model for each other.

Unequivocally the most famous and valuable paintings in Brocks career were his golf paintings – The Bunker; The Drive; and The Putt – all of which were painted in 1894 as part of the same series. These paintings were famously acquired together by a Japanese collector in 1991 for $1.5 million. The most valuable of these is The Putt, which was famously repainted due to the position of the caddy and bystander as the commissioner of the painting wanted to bring himself, the putter, more into the fore front of the painting. Interestingly the initial unsigned painting is considered to be the more impressive of the two versions, and is even used as the print for postcards and posters sold in many Golf Museums.

C E Brock was chosen by art instructor Percy V. Bradshaw as one of the artists to illustrate "The Art of the Illustrator", a collection of twenty portfolios demonstrating six stages of a single painting or drawing by twenty different artists and published in 1918.

Brock did not publish any more work after 1910. He died on 28 February 1938 in Cambridge.

The approach of C.E. Brock's work varied with the sort of story he was illustrating. Some was refined and described as "sensitive to the delicate, teacup-and-saucer primness and feminine outlook of the early Victorian novelists," while other work was "appreciative of the healthy, boisterous, thoroughly English characters" – soldiers, rustics, and "horsey types." Other illustrations were grotesqueries drawn to amuse children looking at or reading storybooks.
Charles Edmund Brock art
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Henry Matthew Brock biography

Henry Matthew Brock biography

Henry Matthew Brock RI (1875 - 1960)
The youngest of a trio of brothers, all of whom were illustrators, Henry Brock shared a studio with brothers Charles and Richard in their large Cambridge house. H.M. Brock was an extremely prolific artist, turning his hand to every conceivable type of publication: classics, novels, poetry, essays, school stories, children's annuals and comics, as well as posters and other forms of advertising. When Leonard Matthews brought in H.M. Brock to draw his serial, Breed of the Brudenells in 1949, it was not the artist's first foray into comic strip work. During the 1930s he had been drawing spot illustrations for comics-notably for Happy Days - and even a strip adventure of school life, Study 13, for Sparkler. It was Breed of the Brudenells, however, later reprinted in Thriller Comics Library no. 9 as Hunted on the Highway, which brought the artist, then in his seventies, into the adventure strip in a major way.

The few issues of the Library drawn by Brock are all superbly evocative of the period in which they are set and - despite the onset of blindness - beautifully drawn and it is only in his very last work, Dick Turpin and the Followers of the Fang (no. 189), that it becomes obvious that his sight was really deteriorating and Pat Nicolle was called in to redraw faces and horses and generally "pull the artwork together". Pat Nicolle recalled just how much he hated having to "muck about" with the great man's work. In truth, however, Pat helped to make Brock's last work one of the best highwayman strips in the genre. Biography courtesy of David Ashford and Norman Wright.
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Robert Brook biography

Robert Brook biography

Robert Brook
Despite a great deal of digging, almost nothing is known about artist Robert Brook. He appears to have begun working for the educational weekly Look and Learn in around 1965. His work was often highly detailed, as shown in the illustration left that depicts a scene from Margaret Landon's novel Anna and the King, which was later turned into the musical The King and I (filmed in 1956, starring Deborah Kerr and Yul Brynner).

This was one of a series of covers Brook produced featuring Famous Couples, others including Hiawatha & Minnehaha, Robespierre & Eleanor Duplay, Andrian Nikolayev & Valentina Tereshkova (two Russian cosmonauts) and Heathcliff & Cathy. Other cover series drawn by Brook included Animal Heroes and Famous Partnerships.

Inside Look and Learn, he illustrated the serial The Red Bonnet by Henry Garnett with some delightful black & white illustrations and a feature on The Literary Lambs (Charles and Mary). He often worked in colour, illustrating historical features such as The Tyrant of Mysore, about the Duke of Wellington's defeat of the Sultan of Mysore in 1799, and a long-running feature on Dancing Around the World, which ran for 20 episodes in 1968. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Robert Brook art
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Mary A Brooks biography

Mary A Brooks biography

Mary A Brooks (born 1922)
Mary Brooks was the illustrator of Enid Blyton's Noddy Gets Into Trouble (1954) and Noddy Meets Father Christmas (1955), having earlier contributed to The Enid Blyton Holiday Annual at least as early as 1951. She wrote and illustrated many books for nursery-age children in the 1960s ranging from early learning titles like One, Two, Three 123 (1966) and ABC 123 (1966) to illustrated animal books, books of rhymes and fairy stories.

She also produced illustrations for the magazine Treasure, where she also illustrated nature scenes. Her work also appeared in a number of books published by Purnell (1978-80) and Dean (1986-87) and it is said that, even in her late eighties, she continues to paint.

Mary A. Brooks was married to Laurence William Penn in Dartford, Kent, in 1947. He died in 1989, aged 73. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Mary Brooks art
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Ralph Bruce biography

Ralph Bruce biography

Ralph Bruce
Ralph Bruce was a talented illustrator who worked for Look and Learn in the 1960s. Until the mid-1960s he was a regular artist for The Children's Newspaper and was probably brought to the educational paper by former Children's Newspaper editor, John Davies, who took over the editorship of Look and Learn in 1965.

His artwork covered a huge range of subjects. His historical illustrations ranged from ancient Greece and Roman Britain, to the eras of Shakespeare, Caxton and modern journalism. He was particularly adept at portraits and drew everyone from Dickens to the Beatles for Look and Learn as well as contributing covers for various series, including Famous Couples and When They Were Young in the late 1960s. Some of his best work was contributed to the long-running series The Story of Opera, penned by Robin May,

Prior to working for Look and Learn, Bruce had illustrated book covers for Digit Books in the late 1950s, titles including The Deep Six by Martin Dibner, I Came Back by Krysyna Zywulska, White August by John Boland, Air Patrol Biscay by Richard T. Bickers, Horns of the Dragon by Felix Trigg, Battle of the Bulge by William M. Stokoe, The God of Channel 1 by Donald Stacy, Nor Iron Bars a Cage by W. H. Aston, all in 1957. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Ralph Bruce art
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Margaret Brundage biography

Margaret Brundage biography

Margaret Hedda Brundage (née Johnson) (9 December 1900 - 9 April 1976; Chicago, USA)
Margaret Brundage was an American illustrator and painter who is remembered chiefly for having illustrated the pulp magazine Weird Tales. Working in pastels on illustration board, she created most of the covers for Weird Tales between 1933 and 1938.

Brundage was born in Chicago, Illinois, of Swedish and Irish ancestry. Her father, Jonathan E. Loutitt (later Loutit) died when she was eight years old; she was raised by her mother (Margaret Jane Loutit Johnson) and grandmother Margaret (Houston) Loutit, for whom she was named, in a Christian Science household. Both her parents had come to Chicago from the Orkney islands off the coast of Scotland. Brundage's mother remained both a widow and a devout Christian Scientist for the rest of her life, and supplemented their income by instructing beginning Christian Science disciples

Margaret Hedda Johnson graduated from Girard Grammar School and attended McKinley High School in Chicago, where, coincidentally, Walt Disney was a classmate. ("I finished; he didn't," she later remarked.) She graduated from McKinley in 1919. As editor of the high school newspaper, Margaret Johnson was able to tell Walt Disney whether or not she would include any of his drawings in the McKinley newspaper. Immediately after high school, Margaret worked providing illustrations for Chicago newspapers - she would draw fashion designs in both colour and in black-and-white, from ideas and descriptions provided by an agency. Her education continued at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts, 1921–23, (where Disney once again was her classmate); she later stated that her failure to graduate was due to her inept lettering though she continued her freelance work for the agency while she completed her coursework. During this period - Prohibition - Margaret also worked at the Dill Pickle Club, a speakeasy. where she met a sometime decorator and house painter nicknamed "Slim" due to his spare frame. This was Myron Reed Brundage, a notorious womaniser.

In 1927, she married Myron "Slim" Brundage in Chicago. Brundage was a former hobo, a man with tendencies toward radical politics and alcohol. They had one child, a son, Kerlyn Byrd Brundage (born 27 August 1927; died 1972), always called "Byrd". The marriage was not a success, and ended in divorce in 1939.

In Weird Tales, Brundage illustrates Robert E. Howard's Queen of the Black Coast, a story about Conan the Barbarian. Over the period from 1933 to 1938, Brundage executed cover art, first for Oriental Stories, later known as The Magic Carpet, then, famously, for Weird Tales. She was the most frequently-appearing cover artist on Weird Tales during her stint with the magazine. Her first cover appeared on the September 1932 issue; she created covers for 39 straight issues from June 1933 to August 1936. Her last original cover was for the Jan. 1945 issue, for a total of 66 original-artwork covers. (The total of 67, often cited in sources, includes a repeat of that final 1945 cover on the November 1953 issue.) She was paid $90 per cover—enough to support herself, her son, and her invalid mother (died 1940) in years when her husband contributed nothing to the family's survival. From 1936 through 1938, Brundage often alternated with others as cover artist; Virgil Finlay was her chief competitor.

Brundage's art frequently featured damsels in distress in various states of full or partial nudity; her whipping scenes were especially noteworthy and controversial. Her sensual images usually illustrated scenes from the pieces chosen by editor Farnsworth Wright as cover stories; her work was so popular among readers that some WT writers, like Seabury Quinn, cannily included scenes in their stories that would make good Brundage covers.

Since she signed her work "M. Brundage", many of the magazine's readers were unaware that the artist was female. (Complaints about the erotic nature of her work increased after October 1934, when editor Wright revealed that the "M." stood for "Margaret," that the artist was a woman.) After 1938, when the magazine's editorial offices moved from Chicago to New York City, a new 'decency' standard was imposed (primarily through the efforts of then-mayor of New York Fiorello La Guardia) on pulp magazines sold at newsstands, and the nude or semi-nude young women that had been the primary subjects of Brundage's covers were out. Practical problems with shipping Brundage's fragile pastel art from Chicago to New York also diminished her appeal to the editorial regime that followed Wright's 1940 departure.

She continued to draw after her relationship with the magazine ended, and appeared at a number of science fiction conventions and art fairs, where some of her original period works were stolen. Yet she never fully recovered financially from the loss of regular work at WT; her later years were spent in relative poverty. She continued to work until her death.
Source: Wikipedia
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Claus Brusen biography

Claus Brusen biography

"I started back in 1976, with drawings inspired by Salvador Dali, and of course by the Album covers in the seventies, especially artists like Patrick Woodroffe. Later I discovered the fantastic work by Michael Parkes which has that romantic dreamlike thing that I love so much. Claude Verlinde for his expression in the faces of his figures, and very dreamlike landscapes.

All three I admire for there fantastic skills, and wonderful sense for composition. Other inspiration sources are the Victorian painters, such as John Anser Fitzgerald and Richard Dadd.

For many years I worked with the surreal expression “Dali/Ernst/Magritte.” But always with the fascination for the world of Fairies and other little creatures.

It was not until 1998 that the world of Nactalius. “The name of my own World.” Started seriously and became the only thing I from then on worked with, the discovering of the ordinary life of fairies and other small creatures has from that year been my only passion to Paint. The fascination of painting is, you are able to create a world that is entirely your own, it is indeed the 'Land of make-believe'." -- Claus Brusen
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Juliana Buch biography

Juliana Buch biography

Juliana Buch Trabal (Active 1970s onwards; Barcelona, Spain)
Juliana Buch Trabal lives and works in Barcelona, Spain. She does artwork for various British comics, such as the girls' comics Bunty, Mandy and Tammy, including comic strips 'Rich Girl, Poor Girl', 'Jumble Sale Jilly', 'Sadie in the Sticks' and 'The Stranger'.

These stories are reprinted in foreign publications, such as the Dutch girls' magazine Tina (where her serial is called 'Marnie en Sanne'). She has also drawn exclusively for Tina, as well as the Dutch magazine Penny.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
Juliana Buch art
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Reg Bunn biography

Reg Bunn biography

Reg Bunn (active 1949 - 1970)
Reg Bunn was the most prolific artist working on the Thriller Comics Library. Best known for his many Robin Hood strips, Bunn did excellent work on the U.S. Cavalry Westerns of Ernest Haycox (The Border Trumpet no. 32) and James Warner Bellah (The White Invader no. 88 and Sabre and Tomahawk no. 95) as well as on such diverse titles as Black Hood no. 21), The Scottish Chiefs (no. 58) and Captain Kidd (no. 105). The vast majority of his Thriller Comics output, however, was for the Robin Hood titles. So closely did he become associated with the character that often, when another artist was drawing the strip, Bunn would be asked just to fill in the faces, so that some sort of conformity of style would be achieved.

Reg Bunn was one of only two people signed up by Leonard Matthews after a nationwide campaign to find strip artists in 1949. The other was Geoff Campion. Coincidentally, both artists came from Birmingham, though neither knew the other. Through invalidity, Bunn was forced to take a sedentary job and, with an open, rounded, jovial, warm-spirited style (his Buck Jones strips, 1949/50 and his earliest Robin Hood work, 1949/51, both for Comet), it changed over the years until it had become decidedly angular by the time he came to draw The Spider and The Waxer for Lion in the 1960s. Biography courtesy of David Ashford and Norman Wright.
Reg Bunn art
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Sid Burgon biography

Sid Burgon biography

Sidney William Burgon (born 3 October 1936; Northumberland, UK)
Sid Burgon was born in Berwick-on-Tweed, Northumberland on 3 October 1936. He was taught to draw by his mother. He left school at 14 and worked as a mechanic for thirteen years, drawing as a hobby and taking night classes in art, until his co-workers at the garage encouraged him to follow his talents. After selling some cartoons, signed "SWAB", to The Weekly News, he quit the day job and became a full-time freelance cartoonist in 1963, working for various newspapers and magazines.

He started drawing comics in 1970, drawing "Hot Rod" for Whizzer and Chips, then "Joker" for Knockout. Other strips he drew at IPC include "The Invisible Monster" (1975) for Monster Fun, "Ivor Lott and Tony Broke" (1981), "Roy's Toys" and "School Funds" (1980s) for Buster, "Adam and his Ants" (1982) for Wow!, "Bookworm" (1978) and "Lolly Pop" for Whoopee!, "The Toffs and the Toughs" in Whizzer and Chips, "Milly O'Nare and Penny Less" for Jackpot, and "Hit Kid" in Krazy.

He won the Society of Strip Illustrators award for Best Artist in 1982. In 1987 he was recruited by DC Thomson, but he insisted that he still be allowed to work for IPC. Strips he drew for DC Thomson included "Biffo the Bear" in The Beano, "Adrian the Barbarian" for The Beezer, and "Bully Beef and Chips" and "Keyhole Kate" for The Dandy. He retired in the late 1990s or early 2000s.
Source: UK Comics Wiki
Sid Burgon art
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Hilary Burn biography

Hilary Burn biography

Hilary Burn
Hilary Burn is a member of the Society of Wildlife Artists. Her work appears in many British bird books.
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Jim Burns biography

Jim Burns biography

Jim Burns (born 1948)
Jim Burns is probably the best known contemporary British Science Fiction illustrator. He has perfected his own style by highlighting not only the traditional elements of SF but also its organic and erotic overtones.

His works are striking for their 'larger than life' portrayal of scenes of the far future and in particular his fantastic 'hardware'. His masterful technique depicts land, sky and space vehicles in gleaming metal and plastic so perfectly painted that one feels one can actually feel the cold metal touch of chrome or smell the pungent odour of plastic. He is constantly in demand for book covers. Jim has worked with Ridley Scott on Bladerunner and has books published of his work, notably Transluminal, Lightship, Planet Story and Mechanismo.
Jim Burns art
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John M Burns biography

John M Burns biography

John M Burns
John M Burns' first work was as an illustrator for Junior Express and School Friend. During the 1960s, Burns worked on TV Century 21 and its sister magazines, including the Space Family Robinson series in Lady Penelope.

For a while he drew daily comics strips for newspapers The Daily Sketch, The Daily Mirror and The Sun, including The Seekers, Danielle and, for a period succeeding Enrique Romero during 1978-79, Modesty Blaise.

He moved on to illustrate TV tie-in strips for now-defunct title Look-in, always scripted by Angus P. Allan. Burns was already well-known by the start of the 1980s. He also worked on the title story for Countdown. It was when he made the crossover to 2000 AD, along with fellow Look-in alumni Jim Baikie and Arthur Ranson, that his position in British comics was cemented.

Burns began by working on Judge Dredd, a strip to which he continues to contribute to this day. By his own admission (in a 2004 interview with David Bishop in the Judge Dredd Megazine), Burns does not enjoy drawing science fiction strips, and the look of Judge Dredd is one that he finds particularly unpleasant to draw: this is ironic, as his version has drawn much reader acclaim.

Recently, Burns lobbied to work on the Nikolai Dante strip, and has proved so successful that he is now considered the lead artist on the story. He has also co-created (with Robbie Morrison) a contemporary adventure strip, The Bendatti Vendetta, for the Megazine, this is unique for the title in having no science fiction or fantasy elements at all.

He recently finished an adaptation of Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, whose script was rendered by Amy Corzine, for UK publisher Classical Comics. Having previously worked on similar adaptions of Lorna Doone by R. D. Blackmore and, which is more, Wuthering Heights by Brontë's sister Emily, Burns was able to bring considerable experience to the project. Burns's recent work is fully painted, and very solidly crafted.
John M Burns art

Some of the most regularly requested art has been John M Burns' fabulous pen and ink artwork for Modesty Blaise, written by Peter O'Donnell. We also have signed original Modesty Blaise newspaper strips by NEVILLE COLVIN, JIM HOLDAWAY, ROMERO and PATRICK WRIGHT or click for all Modesty artwork in stock and not forgetting our highly collectable MODESTY BLAISE BOOKS.
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Frederick William Burton biography

Frederick William Burton biography

Sir Frederick William Burton (8 April 1816 - 16 March 1900 (London); Co. Wicklow, Ireland)
Sir Frederick William Burton RHA was an Irish painter born in Co. Wicklow on 8 April 1816, the third son of Samuel Frederick Burton and his wife Hanna Mallett.

The old Burton seat was Clifden, Corofin, Co. Clare, which was built around the middle of the eighteenth century. The artist's grandparents were Major Edward William Burton, Clifden, who was High Sherriff of Clare in 1799, and his wife, Jane Blood of nearby Roxton.

Educated in Dublin, he was elected an associate of the Royal Hibernian Academy at the age of twenty-one and an academician two years later. In 1842 he began to exhibit at the Royal Academy. A visit to Germany and Bavaria in 1842 was the first of a long series of trips to various parts of Europe, which gave him a profound knowledge of the works of the Old Masters. From 1851 he spent 7 years working as a painter in the service of Maximilian II of Bavaria.

Burton worked with George Petrie on archaeological sketches and was on the council of the Royal Irish Academy and the Archaeological Society of Ireland. He was elected an associate of the Royal Society of Painters in Watercolours in 1855, and a full member in the following year. He resigned in 1870, and re-elected an honorary member in 1886.

Sir Frederick was appointed the third director of the National Gallery, London in 1874.

A knighthood was conferred on him in 1884, and the degree of LL.D. of Dublin in 1889. In his youth he had strong sympathy with the Young Ireland Party. He died in Kensington, west London and is buried in Mount Jerome Cemetery, Dublin.

Burton's best-known watercolours, The Aran Fisherman's Drowned Child (1841) and The Meeting on the Turret Stairs (1864; also known as Hellelil and Hildebrand) are in the National Gallery of Ireland. Meeting on the Turret Stairs was voted by the Irish public as Ireland's favourite painting in 2012 from among 10 works shortlisted by critics.
Source: Wikipedia
Frederick William Burton art
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John Busby biography

John Busby biography

John Busby
John Busby is a member of the Society of Wildlife Artists. His work appears in many British bird books.
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Geoff Campion biography

Geoff Campion biography

Arthur Geoffrey Campion (1916 - 1997)
Geoff Campion brought real punch and vigour into British adventure comics. His characters would charge straight at the reader on horseback or throw an enemy bodily at him. All through the 1950s and 1960s, it was the policy at Fleetway House that their action artists based their styles on the work of Campion. As one editor put it: "When I get a prospective artist in here, I give him a handful of Campion's strips and tell him to draw it exactly like that and you've got it made." But no one could do it quite like Campion could.

Geoff Campion was one of Leonard Matthews' major discoveries. In 1948, he answered an advertisement for new comic artists and, after a short spell of drawing humorous cartoon strips for Knockout, was soon "bagged", as he said, by Leonard Matthews for a new series of comics to be known as Cowboy Comics Library. When Matthews told him he wanted him to try his hand at Westerns, Geoff replied that he couldn't draw horses. Matthews' reply has gone into adventure strip folklore: "Bloody well learn then!" Campion learnt.

As Campion said, "It was advice I've been extremely grateful for ever since." He became one of the country's finest horse artists, and one of the great exponents of the Western genre. Campion was never really at home with other historical periods, however, and his American Civil War saga, Stonewall Jackson Wins His Spurs (no.147) seems far superior to Quo Vadis (no.19), however accurate his portrayal of the film actors involved, and The Last of the Mohicans (no.15) more authentic than Robin Hood's Jest (no. 10). Although Campion was only responsible for one Robin Hood strip, he drew two Dick Turpin strips: his first for the Knockout Fun Book 1954, and the other for Sun, the only Turpin strip printed in the comic in full colour. He also drew a little-known strip featuring a highwaywoman, Black Velvet, for Poppet, the short-lived girl's comic.

Born in Coventry, England and mainly self-taught as an artist, Geoff began his working life as a tax inspector but, during the War as a staff officer in the East India Command, he contributed cartoons to the forces' magazine, Jambo, and, in 1948, successfully answered an advertisement put out by the Amalgamated Press for new artists. For a period during the 1950s, Campion drew the majority of covers for Comet and Sun, as well as most of the long strips, Strongbow the Mohawk, Buffalo Bill, Billy the Kid and Battler Britton. He drew the opening episodes for all these series and the artists who later worked on the series were required to follow his lead. Campion's work was used as a "template", and was continually sent out to artists as examples of what was required. In the '60s he became a stalwart of Lion, drawing Spellbinder, his own favourite strip, and in the '70s, his work could be found in Battle Action, as forceful as ever. Biography extract courtesy of David Ashford and Norman Wright.
Geoff Campion art
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Angel Badia Camps biography

Angel Badia Camps biography

Angel Badia Camps (born 1929; Spain)
Ángel Badia Camps was born in Puig-reig, in the Cataluña area of Spain, which borders southern France, in 1929. His father was exiled to France following the Spanish Civil War, only returning after nine years when Franco offered a conditional amnesty and allowed him to return and move with his family to Barcelona.

His love of drawing had begun early and Camps was encouraged by his parents but his knowledge of comics was limited to En Patufet and his education came with the discovery of American comics at the Sant Antonio market. Camps developed a fascination with American culture – with artists Milton Caniff and Alex Raymond and the films of John Ford and Howard Hawks, with American literature and the music of Glen Miller and jazz.

Camps attended the Escuela Superior de Bellas Artes. He began working professionally in Ameller, drawing fairy stories, and his work began appearing regularly in Florita, Aventuras de Capa Negra (17 issues written by Salvador Dulcet, 1953) and Pulgarcito (1954).

Although he drew comic strips, including the humorous stories of "Pilaropo al servicio de las damas" for La Risa (1956) and medieval historical tales Aventuras de Flecha Roja [Adventures of Red Arrow] (1956-57) and Flecha y Arturo (1956) for Ediciones Gráficas Ricart.

However, it was his work for romance comics such as "Marisol" (Lupita, 1950), Mariló, Sentimentale, Modelo, Dalia, Merche and Sissi that he established himself. He illustrated Bernadette (1956) for Editorial Bruguera. Through this romantic work, Camps developed a lengthy association with the British romantic comics' market, first appearing in Valentine in 1961. Over the next few years he contributed strips to Serenade, Roxy and True Life Library (1964). According to David Roach, "At first glance his drawing style was almost indistinguishable from (Jorge) Longaron's as he mixed a thrillingly loose and expressive line with an inventive and sophisticated sense of composition. His girls were the very epitome of 'the Spanish look' – heavy-lidded, thickly mascara'd eyes, big hair, big lips and lithe, languid bodies."

To give his work accuracy, Camps travelled to the UK and took over 300 reference photos of hospitals, buses, bridges, streets... everything had to be English which was not entirely a chore as his work coincided with the era of The Beatles, swinging London models and MG sports cars.

Camps is perhaps better known in the UK as a cover artist. Following his first appearance in 1960 on the Sexton Blake Library, he produced hundreds of covers for True Life Library, Star Love, Love Story Library, Oracle, Pop Pic Library, Charm, Young Lovers and other titles. The 1950s and 1960s were the heyday of magazine illustration before colour photography became the norm and Camps's paintings were widely reprinted throughout Europe and Scandinavia, often appearing in women's magazines before being reused as covers elsewhere.

For his native Spain, Camps produced heavily illustrated translations of Heidi (1966) and Otra Vez Heidi (1966), based on the works of Juana Spyri, Los Hijos del Capitan Grant (1968) and Viaje al Centro de la Tierra (1969), both by Jules Verne, Aventuras de Tom Sawyer (1969) by Mark Twain and stories featuring Robin Hood (by Norman R, Stinnet) and Davy Crockett (by Elliot Dooley) for Editorial Bruguera.

By the late 1960s, he was working again almost exclusively for Spanish markets, Editorial Bruguera employing him on various lines of paperbacks, including Libro Amigo, La Conquista del espacio, and Selección Terror. Camps also produced work for Molino, Toray and Ceres.

Although he was still earning a good living, and demand for cover artwork slowed in the 1980s as video became a more popular form of home entertainment than reading, Camps set up a school with fellow artist Rafael Cortiella, which ran for ten years. Camps subsequently concentrated on painting, although he had been exhibiting paintings since 1974.

Camps relates the story that he was painting whilst on holiday in Olot when the owner of a Barcelona gallery approached him and asked if he had ever exhibited his work. Camps said he was merely a Sunday painter but the gallery owner was persistent. "He asked if he could come to my studio and took almost everything I had." His work has, from 1986, featured in numerous solo exhibitions in Madrid, Barcelona, London, Brussels, Castellon and New York. His most regular exhibitor is the prestigious Sala Pares in Barcelona. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Angel Badia Camps art

See illustrators issue 1 for an Angel Badia Camps feature article.
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Milton Caniff biography

Milton Caniff biography

Milton Arthur Paul Caniff (28 February 1907 - 3 April 1988; Hillsboro, Ohio, USA)
Milt Caniff was one of the most famous and highly respected American comic strip artists. His newspaper strips Terry and the Pirates and Steve Canyon were syndicated all over the world. Terry and the Pirates ran for over 12 years and featured a host of very memorable characters brought to life by his skilled draughtmanship. Pat Ryan, Dragon Lady, Burma, Chopstick Joe, Singh Singh and April Kane are just a few of his characters that became household names. Terry and the Pirates finished in December 1946, principally because Caniff did not own the rights to his own creation.

He quickly created a new strip Steve Canyon which was to prove equally popular and it ran successfully until his death in 1988.

Caniff was born in Hillsboro, Ohio. He was an Eagle Scout and a recipient of the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award from the Boy Scouts of America. Caniff did cartoons for local newspapers while studying at Stivers High School (now Stivers School for the Arts) in Dayton Ohio. At Ohio State University, Caniff joined the Sigma Chi Fraternity and later illustrated for The Magazine of Sigma Chi and The Norman Shield (the fraternity's pledgeship/reference manual). Graduating in 1930, Caniff began at the Columbus Dispatch where he worked with the noted cartoonist Billy Ireland, but Caniff's position was eliminated during the Great Depression. Caniff related later that he had been uncertain of whether to pursue acting or cartooning as a career and that Ireland said, "Stick to your inkpots, kid, actors don't eat regularly."

In 1932, Caniff moved to New York City to accept an artist job with the Features Service of the Associated Press. He did general assignment art for several months, drawing the comic strips Dickie Dare and The Gay Thirties, then inherited a panel cartoon named Mister Gilfeather in September 1932 when Al Capp quit the feature. Caniff continued Gilfeather until the spring of 1933, when it was retired in favor of a generic comedy panel cartoon called The Gay Thirties, which he produced until he left AP in the autumn of 1934. In July 1933, Caniff began an adventure fantasy strip, Dickie Dare, influenced by series such as Flash Gordon and Brick Bradford. The eponymous main character was a youth who dreamed himself into adventures with such literary and legendary persons as Robin Hood, Robinson Crusoe and King Arthur. In the spring of 1934, Caniff changed the strip from fantasy to "reality" when Dickie no longer dreamed his adventures but experienced them as he traveled the world with a freelance writer, Dickie's adult mentor, "Dynamite Dan" Flynn.

In 1934, Caniff was hired by the New York Daily News to produce a new strip for the Chicago Tribune New York News Syndicate. Daily News publisher Joseph Medill Patterson wanted an adventure strip set in the mysterious Orient, what Patterson described as "the last outpost for adventure," Knowing almost nothing about China, Caniff researched the nation's history and learned about families for whom piracy was a way of life passed down for generations. The result was Terry and the Pirates, the strip which made Caniff famous. Like Dickie Dare, Terry Lee began as a boy who is traveling with an adult mentor and adventurer, Pat Ryan. But over the years the title character aged, and by World War II he was old enough to serve in the Army Air Force. During the 12 years that Caniff produced the strip, he introduced many fascinating characters, most of whom were "pirates" of one kind or another.

Introduced during the early days of the strip was Terry and Pat's interpreter and manservant Connie. They were later joined by the mute Chinese giant Big Stoop. Both he and Connie provided the main source of comic relief. Other characters included: Burma, a blonde with a mysterious, possibly criminal, past; Chopstick Joe, a Chinese petty criminal; Singh Singh, a warlord in the mountains of China; Judas, a smuggler; Sanjak, a lesbian; and then boon companions such as Hotshot Charlie, Terry's wing man during the War years; and April Kane, a young woman who was Terry's first love.

But Caniff's most memorable creation was the Dragon Lady, a pirate queen; she was seemingly ruthless and calculating, but Caniff encouraged his readers to think she had romantic yearnings for Pat Ryan.

During the war, Caniff began a second strip, a special version of Terry and the Pirates without Terry but featuring the blonde bombshell, Burma. Caniff donated all of his work on this strip to the armed forces—the strip was only available in military newspapers. After complaints from the Miami Herald about the military version of the strip being published by military newspapers in the Herald's circulation territory, the strip was renamed Male Call and given a new star, Miss Lace, a beautiful woman who lived near every military base and enjoyed the company of enlisted men, whom she addressed as "Generals". Her function, Caniff often said, was to remind service men what they were fighting for, and while the situations in the strip included much 'double entendre', Miss Lace was not portrayed as being promiscuous.

Much more so than civilian comic strips which portrayed military characters, Male Call was notable for its honest depiction of what the servicemen encountered; one strip displays Lace dating a soldier on leave who had lost an arm (she lost her temper when a civilian insulted him for that disability). Another strip had her dancing with a man in civilian clothes; a disgruntled GI shoved and mocked him for having an easy life, but Lace's partner was in fact an ex-GI blinded in battle. Caniff continued Male Call until seven months after V-J Day, ending it in March 1946.

In 1946 Caniff ended his association with Terry and the Pirates. While the strip was a major success, it was not owned by its creator but by its distributing syndicate, the Chicago Tribune-New York Daily News, a common practice with syndicated comics at the time. And when Caniff, growing more and more frustrated with the lack of rights to the comic strip he produced, was offered the chance to own his own strip by Marshall Field, publisher of the Chicago Sun, the cartoonist quit Terry to produce a strip for Field Enterprises. Caniff produced his last strip of Terry and the Pirates in December 1946 and introduced his new strip Steve Canyon in the Chicago Sun-Times the following month. At the time, Caniff was one of only two or three syndicated cartoonists who owned their creations, and he attracted considerable publicity as a result of this circumstance.

Milton Caniff's Steve Canyon, although not gaining the popularity of Terry and the Pirates, nevertheless enjoyed greater longevity. Like his previous strip, Steve Canyon was an action strip with a pilot as its main character. Canyon was portrayed originally as a civilian pilot with his own one-airplane cargo airline, but he re-enlisted in the Air Force during the Korean War and remained in the Air Force for the remainder of the strip's run.

While Steve Canyon never achieved the popularity that Terry and the Pirates had as a World War II military adventure, it was a successful comic strip with a greater circulation than Terry ever had. A short-lived Steve Canyon television series was produced in 1958. Steve Canyon was often termed the "unofficial spokesman" for the Air Force. The title character's dedication to the military produced a negative reaction among readers during the Vietnam War, and the strip's circulation decreased as a result. Caniff nonetheless continued to enjoy enormous regard in the profession and in newspapering, and he produced the strip until his death in 1988. The strip was published for a couple of months after he died, but was ended in June 1988, due to Caniff's decision that no one else would continue the feature.

The character of Charlie Vanilla, who appeared frequently with an ice cream cone, was based on Caniff's long term friend Charles Russhon, a former photographer and Lieutenant in the US Air Force who later worked as a James Bond movie technical adviser. The character of Madame Lynx was based on Madame Egelichi, the femme fatale spy played by Ilona Massey in the 1949 Marx Brothers movie Love Happy. The character stirred Caniff's imagination, and he hired Ilona Massey to pose for him. Caniff designed Pipper the Piper after John Kennedy and Miss Mizzou after Marilyn Monroe.

Caniff was one of the founders of the National Cartoonists Society and served two terms as its President, 1948 and 1949. He also received the Society's first Cartoonist of the Year Award in 1947 for work published during 1946, which included both Steve Canyon and Terry and the Pirates as well. Caniff would be named Cartoonist of the Year again, receiving the accompanying trophy, the Reuben, in 1972 for 1971, again for Steve Canyon.

He was inducted into the comic book industry's Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1988. He received the National Cartoonists Society Elzie Segar Award in 1971, the Award for Story Comic Strip in 1979 for Steve Canyon, the Gold Key Award (the Society's Hall of Fame) in 1981, and the NCS has since named the Milton Caniff Lifetime Achievement Award in his honor.

In 1977, the Milton Caniff Collection of papers and original art became the foundation for what is known presently as the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum. Covering 696 cubic feet (19.7 m3), the collection fills 526 boxes, plus 12,153 art originals and 59 oversized items. In addition to the original artwork, the collection includes Caniff's personal and business papers, correspondence, research files, photographs, memorabilia, merchandise, realia, awards, audio/visual material and scrapbooks.

He died on May 3, 1988 and was buried in the Mount Repose Cemetery, Haverstraw, New York.
Source: Wikipedia and Illustration Art Gallery
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Josep Marti i Capell biography

Josep Marti i Capell biography

Josep Marti i Capell
Spanish artist Josep Marti i Capell has drawn for various European publishers. He started out with realistic western and war stories for the pocket books of the British Fleetway and Thomson agencies. For The Victor comic, he illustrated comics strips like 'Bill and Ben, the fighting Tennis Men', 'The Whirler', 'Duke Farlow', 'Crazy Fred Kay's Railroad', 'The Seventh Mission' and many others. For Tiger comic he illustrated the comic strip 'Roy of the Rovers'.

At Editorial Ferna he drew 'El Pequeño Grumete' between 1953 and 1957, as well as several western titles. He eventually took on a caricatural style, and commenced a large production for the German market. In the 1970s, he illustrated the series 'Ben's Bande' in Yps with texts by Peter Wiechmann.

For the Kauka Verlag, he drew the shortlived series 'Furor Teutonicus' (or 'Die Teutonen') in Primo in 1974, as well as a revamped version of 'Tom und Biber' for Kauka Gold Comic, called 'Tom Dooley'. He was also an illustrator of several stories with 'Fix und Foxi' and 'Die Pichelsteiner'. Marti drew 'Muumi' for Egmont Kustannus, albums with the elephant 'Benjamin Blümchen' and 'Bibi Blocksberg' for Xenos Verlag, and stories with 'Sumsi' and 'Pumuckl' for the publisher Dino.

He was also involved with the French P&T Productions and Joker Editions with several saucy comics for the collections BD Folies and Blagues Coquines. In a more realistic style, he drew the pony comics 'Ciara' for the Norwegian Olco Publications and 'Herbie' in Penny. For the Apricale Ab in Stockholm, Marti drew a humorous album about medieval monks called 'The Brothers of Apricale'. Throughout his career, he has been mainly affiliated with the Bardon Art agency in Barcelona.
Source: based on Lambiek Comiclopedia
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Roy Carnon biography

Roy Carnon biography

Roy Carnon (1911 - 2002; UK)
Roy Carnon was responsible for a stunning cover for All This and a Medal Too by Tim Carew, published by Corgi Books in 1960. The book was an autobiography, originally published by Constable & Co. in 1954, and featured the reminiscences of the author - real name John Mohun Carew (1921-1980) - about his experiences in the army between 1937 and 1950. Carnon had worked for Corgi Books at least as early as 1956, although had earlier worked in advertising (e.g. for Reed Paper Group).

Carnon, born 6 July 1911, the son of Frederick Wallace Carnon (a civil servant) and his wife Gertrude Eisdell (nee Lee), had grown up in Isleworth, London, attending art school in Chiswick for a short time. He became an illustrator, working mainly for advertising agencies, and was always to be found sketching in parks, or on buses and trains and always carried a small sketch-book or a pack of plain postcards in case inspiration struck.

During the Second World War, Carnon continued to sketch even when he was working as a fireman during the London Blitz; he subsequently joined the RAF ground crew and then became a navigator on Sunderlands, seeing action in Africa, India and the Far East.

After returning to civilian life, Carnon continued to work in advertising, as well as producing book covers. He was responsible for a number of covers for Edgar Rice Boroughs' science fiction novels published by Four Square Books in 1961-65 and illustrated Famous Fighting Aircraft for the Collins Wonder Colour Books series in 1964.

In 1965, Carnon became one of the team responsible for producing concept drawings, sketches and paintings for Stanley Kubrick, then working with author Arthur C. Clarke on the landmark science fiction movie 2001: A Space Odyssey. For this he was responsible for visualising space craft, film sets and the iconic 'wheel' space station.

After this, he worked on many other movies, including the Bond movies, Where Eagles Dare, The Battle of Britain, Frenzy, Superman, The Dogs of War, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Reds, The Dark Crystal, Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi, Ladyhawke and Link.

Roy Frederick Carnon was married to Violet Marian Steer in 1935 (died 1971); he re-married, in 1998, to Margaret J. Harrold. He died in August 2002, aged 91. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Nino Caroselli biography

Nino Caroselli biography

Benedetto "Nino" Caroselli; Italy
Nino Caroselli was an Italian painter and illustrator. Although not much is known about him, he would appear to have been active in Italy as a cover artist and painter.

In the UK, Nino Caroselli produced hundred of covers for the pocket libraries published by Fleetway. He first appeared in 1959 as an illustrator for Top Spot but very quickly established himself as a cover artist on Super Detective Library, Thriller Picture Library and Cowboy Picture Library. However, it was his work for the War libraries that would keep him busy for many years during the 1960s.

Caroselli also did 16 covers for the Sexton Blake Library in 1960-61 and he also produced at least one book cover (Angelique and the King by Sergeanne Golon, J. B. Lippincott).
Source: Steve Holland
Nino Caroselli art
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Brian Casey introduction

Brian Casey introduction

" I have had a passion for Motorsport for as long as I can remember - as small boy I would often smuggle my way into the Crystal Palace Race Circuit to listen to the sound of Racing cars warming up thier engines early on a Sunday morning, in the glorious days before the noise abatement people objected. I would get there early in the morning hoping to catch a glimpse of the likes of the young Mansell and Senna. Little did I know what an effect this was going to have on me in later life, even when I left home, got married and eventually moved to Kent.

Purely by chance I found myself living 20 minutes from the historic Brands Hatch racing circuit, so it was only a matter of time before I was chatting with a colleague from work who was a Motorbike Marshall at the weekends. He invited me along to a meeting at Lyddon Race Circuit in Kent. I was hooked and travelled the whole lengh of Britain armed with my trusty camera. It was around this time that I really started to take my passion to another level as I was getting more and more commissions from Riders and their friends, I was going to bigger Race Meetings, taking myself off to Brands Hatch for British Superbike Meetings, the British Grand Prix and most of the Car and Bike shows, collating photographic material for future commissioned artworks.

I like to capture the sense of action, speed and excitement, along with a fantastic eye for detail, so the recent demand for commissioned art from Corporate, Commercial, and private clients has increased to a level that I now work full time as a Freelance Illustrator. I have work published with Felix Rosenstiels Widow and Son, in the Markham Collection, and my portfolio includes Formula 1, Superbikes, Touring Cars, GT'S, Supercars, the Clubman Motorbike Riders, Classic and Convertibles. I am a full member of the Guild of Motoring Artists, also a full member of the Coloured Pencil Society. "

Exhibits: The Donnington Motor Museum; The Goodwood Revival Meeting; Silverstone Race Circuit; Brands Hatch Race Circuit; The Bromley Pageant of Motoring; The Hop Farm Car, and Bike Meetings; Knebworth House (Car Show); Stamford House (Jaguar Show); Hall Place & Gardens, Kent (Solo Art Exhibition) .
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Richard Caton Woodville Jnr biography

Richard Caton Woodville Jnr biography

Richard Caton Woodville Jnr. (1856 - 1927, England)
Richard Caton Woodville Jr was a widely recognised and prolific artist, producing many accomplished illustrations and paintings, notably for the Illustrated London News. He is particularly remembered for his battle scenes and many of his paintings are in military art collections, such as the National Army Museum, the Royal Naval College, the Royal Canadian Military Institute, the London Scottish Regiments Museum Trust and West Point, as well as national collections such as the Tate Gallery.

He was the son of Richard Caton Woodville (1825-1855) an American artist and the son of a stockbroker, who originally studied medicine but who turned to painting as a career.

In 1845, at the age of 20, Caton Woodville Jnr left Baltimore to train at the Kunstacademie in Düsseldorf, Germany, where he lived for the next six years with his wife, Mary Theresa (nee Buckler), whom he had married on 3 January 1844.

In 1879, his painting Before Leuthen, Dec. 3rd, 1757 was exhibited at the Royal Academy and, over the next few years he produced many popular paintings, amongst them Kandahar and Saving the Guns at Maiwand (both inspired by the Second Anglo-Afghan War), and many scenes from the Zulu War and First Boer War. His painting The Moonlight Charge at Kassassin,was exhibited at the Fine Art Society in 1883 and The Guards at Tel-e-Kebir was exhibited by Royal Command in 1884. The latter was painted for the Royal Family in 1882 and led to a number of further commissions, including the wedding of Princess Beatrice to Prince Henry of Battenberg in 1885. He later also painted a portraits King Edward VII and King George V.

Woodville was commissioned by the Illustrated London News to paint a series depicting famous battle throughout history, including the charnge of the Light Brigade, the Charge of the 21st Lancers at Omdurman, the Battle of Blenheim, the Battle of Badajos and several of the Battle of Waterloo. In 1895 he produced some 200 drawings, 2 large paintings and 2 smaller paintings. He maintained a large collection of arms and uniforms at his studio.

Woodville lived at Flat B, Dudley Mansions, 29 Abbey Road, St John's Wood, Middlesex, where he committed suicide on 17 August 1927: at shortly after 1 pm, Woodville's housekeeper and a friend, Mr. P. Gair, heard a report from a revolver and found Woodville sitting in his favourite chair in the studio attached to his house with a bullet wound to his head. He was still breathing, but died on the way to the hospital. Although he had been laughing and joking only that morning, Woodville had recently been suffering from heart trouble and pain from his leg, which he had broken years earlier and which had been aggravated by a second accident in Egypt.

After such an active life, Woodville was worried that, at 71, he would become an invalid. A letter read out at an inquest on 20 August 1927 revealed his final thoughts: "I am mentally and bodily ill. My health is a thing of the past." The Coroner recorded a verdict that Woodville was of unsound mind when he shot himself. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Richard Caton Woodville Jnr art
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Catel biography

Catel biography

Catherine Muller (born 27 August 1964; France)
Catherine Muler, also known as Cathy Muller, Catel Muller or simply Catel, studied at the School of Plastic Arts in Strasbourg, where she graduated in 1990. She specialized in illustrations for children, and has cooperated with the publishers Nathan, Epigones and Hachette. In 1996, she made her first stories with the characters 'Bop et Blop' in cooperation with Paul Martin for the monthly Images Doc, published by Bayard Presse.

Present in Je Bouquine from 1999, she graphically created the series 'Marion & Charles', based on two novel characters by Fanny Jolly. In 2000, she began the series 'Lucie' with writer Véronique Grisseaux in the collection Tohu Bohu of Les Humanoïdes Associés. The series was continued by the publishing house Casterman from 2003 until 2006.

Together with scriptwriter Sophie Dieuaide, she made 'Les Papooses', also for Casterman between 2003 and 2005. Her series 'Top Linotte' runs in the Fleurus magazine Les P'tites Sorcières, and has been published in book format by Fleurus and Dupuis since 2010.

In 2004, she wrote the more adult World War I comic 'Le Sang des Valentines' for Christian De Metter. Besides children's comics, she has also made graphic novels like the comics biographies of 'Kiki de Montparnasse' (2007) and 'Marie Gouze dit Olympe de Gouges' (2012) with Jean-Louis Bocquet, 'Dolor' with Philippe Paringaux (2010) and 'Rose Valland, capitaine Beaux-Arts' with Claire Bouilhac and Emmanuelle Polack (2009).
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
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Lance Cattermole biography

Lance Cattermole biography

Lance Harry Mosse Cattermole (1898 - 1992)
Lance Cattermole, the Science Museum Group, of all places tells us, was born in Ireland, 19 July 1898, son of Sydney Cattermole, an artist, and grandson of George Cattermole (1800-68) – illustrator of ‘The Old Curiosity Shop’ and other Charles Dickens works.

Educated in Worthing, Sussex and Odiham, Hants, and studied at Central School of Arts & Crafts 1922-23 and at the Slade School 1923-26. Cattermole lived near Worthing for many years.

He is represented in many museums and collections. Produced posters for BR. Produced artwork for Scottish Region series. The Look and Learn site shows two pieces credited to him.

Lance Cattermole drew lots of railway posters and many are archived in the National Railway Museum. One of my favourites is not the traditional tourist-duping sunny scene of the British seaside but this lovely lady from “Morecambe for First Class Holidays” poster (1960). Cattermole also drew for the prestigious Macmillan educational posters series in the 1960s.

It's confusing as to why he would serve in the First World War in 21st Eastern Ontario Battalion Canadian Expeditionary Force as it states on the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regiment Museum site where you can see a sketch (for a Player’s Cigarette card) with a very familiar signature – so maybe it's right!

A story by Anthony C. Wilson called “A voice in the wall” appeared in the BBC Children’s Hour Annual (1952) and Cattermole's illustrations are remarkable for their sharp colour and movement.
Source: Standby4action and Illustration Art Gallery
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Caza biography

Caza biography

Philippe Cazaumayou (born 1941; USA)
Caza (born Philippe Cazaumayou) has never been appreciated in the UK and USA the way he should be and indeed is in Europe. He's as much an Sci-Fi visionary as Moebius and shares a similar sense of the horrifically bizarre with H. R. Giger.
Caza art
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Glenn Chadbourne biography

Glenn Chadbourne biography

Glenn Chadbourne (born late October circa 1963; Maine, USA)
Glenn Chadbourne is an American artist. He lives in Newcastle, Maine. He is best known for his work in the horror and fantasy genres, having created covers and illustrated books and magazines for publishers such as Cemetery Dance Publications, Subterranean Press, and Earthling Publications. Mr. Chadbourne is known for his sense of humour and down to earth manner, as well as the stark honesty of his work.

Glenn Chadbourne attended Lincoln Academy before continuing his education at The Portland School of Art. He also attended the University of Maine at Augusta, as well as the University of Southern Maine.

His first published work was in the late 1980s for the Stephen King related newsletter called Castle Rock. He won a contest that called for artists to submit something Stephen King related.

He wrote, illustrated, and self-published a few comics called ChillVille and Farmer Fiend's Horror Harvest in the early 1990s. He eventually met Rick Hautala and was asked to illustrate his short story collection Bedbugs. After Cemetery Dance Publications printed Bedbugs in 1999, things began to click for Mr. Chadbourne, and he has since illustrated work for many of the top names in the horror genre.

He recently illustrated The Secretary of Dreams: Volume 1, a graphic collection of Stephen King stories that was published by Cemetery Dance Publications in 2006 in three limited editions. Volume Two was announced as being drawn by Glenn Chadbourne in early 2007.

"I was born up here in Damariscotta, Maine, some 49 years back on a late October day. Nothing spectacular there. No particular fanfare. No sirens bleating in the streets, no cries of joy or horror from those in attendance."
Source: Wikipedia
Glenn Chadbourne art
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Paul Chadwick biography

Paul Chadwick biography

Paul Chadwick (born 1957; Seattle, USA)
Paul Chadwick is an American comic book creator best known for his series Concrete about a normal man trapped in a rock-hard body.

Born in Seattle, Chadwick grew up in its suburb Medina, where his father, Stephen F. Chadwick, was the City Attorney. As a teenager, he participated in Apa-5, the amateur press alliance of comics fans, and he then attended Art Center College of Design, majoring in illustration. Graduating in 1979, he began his career creating storyboards for Disney, Warner Brothers, Lucasfilm and other film studios, contributing to such films as Pee Wee's Big Adventure, Strange Brew, The Big Easy, Ewoks: The Battle for Endor, Lies and Miracle Mile.

Chadwick provided art for the Dazzler comic book, published by Marvel Comics, before creating Concrete, first published by Dark Horse Comics in Dark Horse Presents #1 (July 1986). He wrote Gifts of the Night for DC Comics' Vertigo with art by John Bolton.

After working on several Matrix comics, Chadwick was asked by the Wachowskis to write The Matrix Online. He outlined the general story direction (and various natural offshoots) of events to take place in the MMORPG game.

He illustrated cards for the Magic: The Gathering collectible card game.

Chadwick has personally been recognized for his work with the Eisner Award for Best Writer/Artist for 1989, and nominations for the Harvey Awards for Best Artist, Writer, and Writer/Artist that same year. His work on Concrete has also won that series several awards.
Source: Wikipedia
Paul Chadwick art
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John F Chalkley biography

John F Chalkley biography

John Frederick Chalkley (1938 - 2009; UK)
John Chalkley worked as both an illustrator and as a fine artist. His art education was at Hornsey College of Art 1955 - 1961. From then until 1985, when he commenced painting full time, he combined painting with teaching art on a part-time basis. He also worked as a freelance illustrator for books and magazines.

John Chalkley has exhibited in many mixed shows and staged more than 20 one-man exhibitions in galleries in Yorkshire, the Lake District, Devon, Hertfordshire and London.
Source: http://www.artjohnchalkley.co.uk/index.htm
John F Chalkley art
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Steven Chapman biography

Steven Chapman biography

Steven Halliwell Chapman (active c1925 - 1969)
Steven Chapman had been drawing for juvenile adventure stories since the mid 1920s, notably in the Aldine Robin Hood and Wild West annuals. In the 1930s he was contributing picture stories for the back pages of various Amalgamated Press comics as well as illustrations for their story papers such as Triumph and Champion. Indeed, at some time or other, he contributed spot illustrations and covers to the majority of the boys' and girls' papers published by the firm. This wide experience enabled him to bring a wealth of expertise to his work for the Thriller Comics Library. Whether drawing pirates (To Sweep the Spanish Main no. 56), Elizabethan courtiers (Kenilworth no. 51), or the many Three Musketeers adventures he did for the library, Steve Chapman was one of the finest and most historically accurate of artists, always evoking the authentic period atmosphere.

Incidentally, there was something decidedly Elizabethan about Steve Chapman's appearance and Matthews persuaded Sep Scott to use Chapman as a model for his cover painting of Kenilworth - most appropriate as Chapman had drawn the entire strip! When his style - and, indeed, the whole genre of historical strips - lost favour with the Amalgamated Press, Steve Chapman found himself temporarily without work. Amalgamated Press' loss was D.C. Thomson's gain and, from 1961, Chapman spent the rest of his working life drawing magnificent strips for the likes of Hotspur and Victor, utilizing all his skills at depicting historical adventure. Fittingly, his last strip, for the 1969 Hotspur annual, was set in Regency prize-fighting days. Biography extract courtesy of David Ashford and Norman Wright.
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Howard Chaykin biography

Howard Chaykin biography

Howard V. Chaykin (born 7 October 1950; New Jersey, USA)
Howard Chaykin was born in Newark, NJ and started his career in comics as an assistant to Gil Kane. Working in the studio of Wallace Wood, he made his debut with the western 'Shattuck' in Overseas Weekly in cooperation with Nicola Cuti. He also assisted Gray Morrow and Neal Adams.

From the early 1970s, Chaykin worked as a freelancer for publishers like Marvel, DC, Warren and Atlas. He started out drawing stories for publications like Marvel Spotlight and Marvel Premiere, working with characters like 'Solomon Kane' and 'Monark Startalker'. In 1974, he created 'Cody Starbuck' for the Star Reach review.

In Heavy Metal, he proved himself one of the best authors of science-fiction graphic novels. Chaykin pioneered the graphic novel in the USA with 'The Stars my Destination', 'The Swords of Heaven' and 'Flowers from Hell'. In 1977, prior to the movies, he drew the first 'Star Wars' comics with scripts by Roy Thomas for Marvel, which were a very big hit.

In 1983, he created the hit seies 'American Flagg!' over at First Comics. Among his best known comics are his DC works 'The Shadow' (1986) and 'Blackhawk' (1988), and his post-modern graphic novel 'Time2' at First Comics (1987), in which he could endulge his love for jazz and New York.

In 1988, he created the erotic 'Black Kiss'. Since then his comics output has been limited. He briefly returned to Marvel for a Wolverine/Nick Fury graphic novel and the mini-series 'Power and Glory'. Howard Chaykin also works as an executive script consultant for televsion on such serials as 'The Flash' and 'Viper TV'.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
Howard Chaykin art

See illustrators issue 12 for a Howard Chaykin feature article.
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Alessandro Chiarolla biography

Alessandro Chiarolla biography

Alessandro Chiarolla (born 11 September 1942; Italy)
Alessandro Chiarolla was born in Mogadishu, Somalia, an Italian colony in Africa at the time. He entered the comics field with the help of Renato Polese. He began working for Il Vittorioso in 1960, with his first comic 'La Bella Petroia'. During the 1960s, he produced many comics for Il Vittorioso and Il Giornalino.

Until 1974, he drew for foreign publishers through art agencies. For the British Fleetway, he worked on Princess Tina ('Catherine Arrogant'), Tiger, Hurricane and Buster ('Patch Eye Hooker', etc.). For France, he illustrated strips with 'Lancelot', and for Germany, he produced 'Reno Kid' and 'Buffalo Bill'.

He cooperated with Alfredo Castelli on several stories for Il Giornalino and Il Corriere dei Ragazzi, such as 'Bassa Marea', 'Fortini sul Fiume' and the series 'Central Hospital'. After a brief stint at the publishing houses Lancioi and Edifumetto, Chiarolla joined the publishing house Bonelli, where he illustrated such series as 'Bella & Bronco', 'Martin Mystère' and 'Zagor'.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
Alessandro Chiarolla art
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Frank Cirocco biography

Frank Cirocco biography

Frank Cirocco (born 13 June 1956)
Frank Cirocco was born on June 13, 1956, per profile in Alien Legion #1 (April 1984), or on June 15, 1955.

Frank Cirocco started his comics career in underground comix. He founded underground magazine Venture in 1976, together with Gary Winnick.

He went on to become an artist for Marvel, where he has worked on a list of titles. He co-created 'Alien Legion' with Carl Potts. Again with Gary Winnick, Frank Cirocco founded Lightsource Studios, where he created the comic 'Space Babe', among others.

His non-comics employers include Lightsource Studios, Dreamworks, Yahoo!, LucasArts, Microsoft, Electronic Arts, LeapFrog, Mattel, Universal Studios, and Rocket Science Games.
Source: Comicbookdb.com
Frank Cirocco art
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Bob Clampett biography

Bob Clampett biography

Robert Emerson "Bob" Clampett (8 May 1913 - 2 May 1984; San Diego, California, USA)
Bob Clampett was an American animator, producer, director, and puppeteer best known for his work on the Looney Tunes animated series from Warner Bros., and the television shows Time for Beany and Beany and Cecil. Clampett was born and raised not far from Hollywood, and early on expressed an interest in animation and puppetry. After leaving high school a few months shy of graduating in 1931, Clampett joined the team at Harman-Ising Productions and began working on the studio's newest short subjects, titled Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies.

Clampett was promoted to a directorial position in 1937 and during his fifteen years at the studio, directed 84 cartoons later deemed classic and designed some of the studio's most famous characters, including Porky Pig and Tweety. Among Clampett's most acclaimed films are Porky in Wackyland (1938), Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs (1943) and The Great Piggy Bank Robbery (1946). Clampett left Warner Bros. Cartoons in 1946 and turned his attention to television, creating the famous puppet show Time for Beany in 1949. A later animated version of the series, titled Beany and Cecil, ran on ABC for five years beginning in 1962 and ending in 1967, which was well loved by millions, and credited "a Bob Clampett Cartoon".

In his later years, Clampett toured college campuses and animation festivals as a lecturer on the history of animation. His Warner cartoons have seen renewed praise in decades since for their surrealistic qualities, energetic and outrageous animation, and irreverent humor. Animation historian Jerry Beck lauded Clampett for "putting the word 'looney' in Looney Tunes."

Robert Emerson "Bob" Clampett was born in San Diego, California and was displaying extraordinary art skills by the age of five. From the beginning, Clampett was intrigued with and influenced by Douglas Fairbanks, Lon Chaney, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd, and he began making film short-subjects in his garage beginning when he was twelve. While living in Hollywood as a young boy, Clampett and his mother Joan lived next door to Charlie Chaplin and his brother Syd. Clampett also recalled watching his father play handball at the Los Angeles Athletic Club with another of the great silent comedians, Harold Lloyd. From his early teens Clampett showed an interest in animation and puppetry. Clampett made hand puppets as a child, and before adolescence had completed what animation historian Milt Gray describes as "a sort of prototype, a kind of nondescript dinosaur sock puppet that later evolved into Cecil." In high school, Clampett drew a full-page comic about the nocturnal adventures of a pussycat, later published in color in a Sunday edition of the Los Angeles Times. King Features took note and offered Clampett a "cartoonist's contract" to begin a seventy-five dollars a week after high school. King Features allowed Clampett to work in their Los Angeles art department on Saturdays and vacations during high school. On occasion, King Features would print one of Clampett's cartoons for encouragement. In addition, they paid his way through Otis Art Institute, where Clampett learned to paint with oils and to sculpt.

Clampett attended both Glendale High School and Hoover High School in Glendale California but left Hoover a few months short of graduating in 1931. Afterwards, Clampett got a job working at a doll factory owned by his aunt, Charlotte Clark. Clark was looking for an appealing item to sell and Clampett suggested Mickey Mouse due to growing popularity. Unable to find a drawing of the character anywhere, Clampett took his sketchpad to the movies and came out with several sketches. Clark was concerned with the copyright, so the two drove to the Disney studio. Walt and Roy Disney were delighted and they set up a business not far from the Disney studio. Clampett recalled his short time working for Disney: "Walt Disney himself sometimes came over in an old car to pick up the dolls; he would give them out to visitors to the studio and at sales meetings. I helped him load the dolls in the car. One time his car, loaded with Mickeys, wouldn't start, and I pushed while Walt steered, until it caught, and he took off."

Clampett was, in his words, so "enchanted" by the new medium of sound cartoons that he instead joined Harman-Ising Studios in 1931 for ten dollars a week. Schlesinger viewed one of Clampett's 16mm films and was impressed, offering him an assistant position at the studio. His first job was animating secondary characters in the first Merrie Melodie, Lady, Play Your Mandolin! (1931). The same year, Clampett began attending story meetings after submitting an idea eventually used for Smile, Darn Ya, Smile!. The two series were produced at Harman-Ising until mid-1933 when they split into Leon Schlesinger Productions. In his first years at the studio, Clampett mostly worked for Friz Freleng, under whose guidance Clampett grew into an able animator. When he joined Harman-Ising, Bob Clampett was only 17 years old.

By 1934, Schlesinger was in a bit of a crisis trying to find a well-known cartoon character. He noted that the Our Gang series consisted of nothing but "little kids doing things together," and a studio-wide drive to get ideas for an animal version of Our Gang commenced. Clampett submitted a drawing of a pig (Porky) and a black cat (Beans), and, in an imitation of the lettering on a can of Campbell's Pork and Beans, wrote "Clampett's Porky and Beans." Porky debuted in the Friz Freleng-directed I Haven't Got a Hat in 1935. Around the same time, Schlesinger announced a studio-wide contest, with a money prize to whichever member of the staff turned in the best original story. Clampett's story won first prize and was made into My Green Fedora, also directed by Freleng.

Clampett felt encouraged after these successes, and began writing in more story contributions. After Schlesinger realized he needed another unit, he made a deal with Tex Avery, naming Clampett his collaborator. They were moved to a ramshackle building used by gardeners and WB custodial staff for storage of cleaning supplies, solvents, brooms, lawnmowers and other implements.] Working apart from the other animators in the small, dilapidated wooden building in the middle of the Vitaphone lot, Avery and Clampett soon discovered they were not the only inhabitants - they shared the building with thousands of tiny termites. They christened the building "Termite Terrace", a name eventually used by fans and historians to describe the entire studio. The two soon developed an irreverent style of animation that would set Warner Bros. apart from its competitors. They were soon joined by animators Chuck Jones, Virgil Ross, and Sid Sutherland, and worked virtually without interference on their new, groundbreaking style of humor for the next year. It was a wild place with an almost college fraternity-like atmosphere. Animators would frequently pull pranks such as gluing paper streamers to the wings of flies. Leon Schlesinger, who rarely ventured there, was reputed on one visit to have remarked in his lisping voice, "Pew, let me out of here! The only thing missing is the sound of a flushing toilet!"

On the side, Clampett directed a sales film, co-animated by Chuck Jones and in-betweened by Robert Cannon. Clampett filmed Cannon in live action as the hero and rotoscoped it into the film. Clampett planned to leave Leon Schlesinger Productions, but Schlesinger offered him a promotion to director and more money if he would stay. Clampett was promoted to director in late 1936, directing a color sequence in the feature When's Your Birthday? (1937). This led to what was essentially a co-directing stint with fellow animator Chuck Jones for the financially ailing Ub Iwerks, whom Schlesinger subcontracted to produce several Porky Pig shorts. These shorts featured the short-lived and generally unpopular Gabby Goat as Porky's sidekick. Despite Clampett and Jones' contributions, however, Iwerks was the only credited director. Clampett's first cartoon with a directorial credit was Porky's Badtime Story. Under the Warner system, Clampett had complete creative control over his own films, within severe money and time limitations (he was only given $3,000 and four weeks to complete each short). During production of Porky's Duck Hunt in 1937, Avery created a character that would become Daffy Duck and Clampett animated the character for the first time.

Clampett was so popular in theaters that Schlesinger told the other directors to imitate him, emphasizing gags and action. When Tex Avery departed in 1941, Avery's unit was taken over by Clampett, while Norman McCabe took over Clampett's old unit. Clampett finished Avery's remaining unfinished cartoons. When McCabe joined the armed forces, Frank Tashlin rejoined Schlesinger as director, and that unit was eventually turned over to Robert McKimson. Milton Gray notes that from The Hep Cat (1942) on, the cartoons become even more wild as Clampett's experimentation reached a peak. Clampett later created the character of Tweety, introduced in A Tale of Two Kitties in 1942. His cartoons grew increasingly violent, irreverent, and surreal, not beholden to even the faintest hint of real-world physics, and his characters have been argued to be easily the most rubbery and wacky of all the Warner directors'. Clampett was heavily influenced by the Spanish surrealist artist Salvador Dalí, as is most visible in Porky in Wackyland (1938), wherein the entire short takes place within a Dalí-esque landscape complete with melting objects and abstracted forms. Clampett and his work can even be considered part of the surreal movement, as it incorporated film as well as static media. It was largely Clampett's influence that would impel the Warners directors to shed the final vestiges of all Disney influence and enter the territory they are famous for today. Clampett was also famous for doing some brief voices or sound effects in some of the cartoons, the most famous being ending his most famous cartoons with his own joke on impersonating the Warner Bros. zooming in shield sound effect (otherwise known as "Bay-woop!"). Clampett liked to bring hip cultural movements into his cartoons, especially jazz; film, magazines, comics, novels, and popular music are referenced in Clampett shorts, most visible in Book Revue (1946), where performers are drawn onto various famous books.

Clampett was a good source for censorship stories, though the accuracy of his recollections has been disputed. According to an interview published in Funnyworld #12 (1971), Clampett had a method for ensuring that certain elements of his films would escape the censors'cut. It consisted of adding material aimed just at the censors. They would focus on cutting those and thus leave in the ones he actually wanted.

Clampett continued to direct cartoons each year at the studio until 1946. His unit was taken over by Arthur Davis. The Big Snooze was his final cartoon with the studio, and one for which he did not get screen credit (only one of three he directed pitting Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd). While the generally accepted story was that Clampett left over matters of artistic freedom, Davis remembered that Clampett was fired by then-cartoon studio executive Eddie Selzer, who was far less tolerant of him than Leon Schlesinger. Clampett's style was becoming increasingly divergent from those of Freleng and Jones, the other unit directors, and this is thought by some to be the primary reason for his departure. The Warners style that he was so instrumental in developing was leaving him behind. Warner Bros. had recently bought the rights to the entire Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies studio from Schlesinger, and while his cartoons of 1946 are today considered on the cutting edge of the art for that period, at the time, Clampett was ready to seek new challenges. Clampett left at what some considered the peak of his creativity and against everyone's advice.

Clampett worked for a time at Screen Gems, then the cartoon division of Columbia Pictures, as a screenwriter and gag writer. In 1947 Republic Pictures incorporated animation (by Walter Lantz) into its Gene Autry feature film Sioux City Sue. It turned out well enough for Republic to dabble in animated cartoons; Bob Clampett directed a single cartoon, It's a Grand Old Nag, featuring the equine character Charlie Horse. Republic management, however, had second thoughts due to dwindling profits, and discontinued the series. Clampett took his direction credit under the name "Kilroy".

In 1949, Clampett turned his attentions to television, where he created the famous puppet show Time for Beany. The show, featuring the talents of voice artists Stan Freberg and Daws Butler, would earn Clampett three Emmys. Groucho Marx and Albert Einstein were both fans of the series. In 1952, he created the Thunderbolt the Wondercolt television series and the 3D prologue to Bwana Devil featuring Beany and Cecil. In 1954, he directed Willy the Wolf (the first puppet variety show on television), as well as creating and voicing the lead in the Buffalo Billy television show. In the late 1950s, Clampett was hired by Associated Artists Productions to catalog the pre-August 1948 Warner cartoons it had just acquired. He also created an animated version of the puppet show called Beany and Cecil, which began its run on ABC in 1962 and was on the network for five years.

In his later years, Bob Clampett toured college campuses and animation festivals as a lecturer on the history of animation. In 1975 he was the focus of a documentary entitled Bugs Bunny: Superstar, the first documentary to examine the history of the Warner Bros. cartoons. Clampett, whose collection of drawings, films, and memorabilia from the golden days of Termite Terrace was legendary, provided nearly all of the behind-the-scenes drawings and home-movie footage for the film; furthermore, his wife, Sody Clampett, is credited as the film's production co-ordinator. In an audio commentary recorded for Bugs Bunny: Superstar, director Larry Jackson claimed that in order to secure Clampett's participation, and access to Clampett's collection of Warners history, he had to sign a contract that stipulated Clampett would host the documentary and also have approval over the final cut. Jackson also claimed that Clampett was very reluctant speaking about the other directors and their contributions.

Clampett died of a heart attack on May 2, 1984 in Detroit, Michigan, just six days before his 71st birthday, while touring the country to promote the home video release of Beany & Cecil cartoons. He is buried in Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills.
Source: Wikipedia
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James Clark biography

James Clark biography

James Clark (1895 - 10 July 1977; Glasgow, Scotland)
James Clark was born in Glasgow and began working at the the publishing firm of John Leng in Dundee in 1919. He contributed illustrations to adult and children's publications. For more than thirty years, he drew the adventures of 'Willie Waddle' for various titles and annuals. When D.C. Thomson launched The Dandy Comic in 1937, Clark was present with 'Jimmy and his Grockle'.

He then made 'Leave It To Lop Ears' in Magic Comic, 'Centipede Pete' and 'King of the Jungle' in Dandy Comic. Clark was asked to do the illustration of 'Three Men in a Tub' in 1940, and these illustrations show his artistic talent to the full extent. His cartoons, as well as the strip 'Towser', appeared in The People's Journal (1944-47).

From the late 1940s, he was present in The Beano with 'The Invisible Giant' and a new version of 'Pansy Potter' (1949-55). From 1953 to 1960, he drew 'Tiny Tim' for The Topper and his other 1950s work includes 'Young Dandy', 'The Castaway Kydds' and 'Dockland Davie' for The Dandy. James Clark died in 1977, aged eighty-two.
Source: Lambiek
James Clark art
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Dorian Cleavenger biography

Dorian Cleavenger biography

Dorian Cleavenger
Dorian Cleavenger is a highly collected artist who has worked for Disney, US Steel and many other large corporations and is well known for his pseudo realism and erotic pin up art.
Source: The Illustration Art Gallery
Dorian Cleavenger art
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Rene Cloke biography

Rene Cloke biography

Rene Cloke (born 1904; Plymouth, UK)
Rene Cloke was born Irene Mabel N. Cloke in Plymouth on 8 October 1904. According to the Dictionary of British Book Illustrators, she "works as a postcard and greetings card designer, and as an author and illustrator of stories for very young children ... mainly depicting nursery animals and pixies."

As well as her books, she also produced illustrations for many annuals, including Uncle Oojah's Big Annual, Blackie's Children's Annual, Tiny Tots Annual, Jack and Jill Annual, Playhour Annual and Jack and Jill Harold Hare Book.

She also contributed to Sunny Stories.
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Eduardo Teixeira Coelho biography

Eduardo Teixeira Coelho biography

Eduardo Teixeira Coelho (3 January 1919 - 31 May 2005; Terceira island, Azores, Portugal)
Eduardo Teixeira Coelho was a Portuguese comic book artist and illustrator best known for his adventure series Ragnar le Viking. In some of his early work he used the pseudonym Martin Sievre.

Coelho's career began when he moved from The Azores to mainland Portugal. His most notable work there was for the magazine Mosquito, beginning in 1943. He moved to Brazil in the 1950s and taught at the Pan-American School of Art in São Paulo. In 1955 he moved to France and for the next several decades worked on a number of series, many of them for the magazine Vaillant, including Ragnar.

Coelho died in Florence, Italy, aged 86, where he had lived for several years.
Source: Wikipedia
Eduardo Teixeira Coelho art
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Joseph Clement Coll biography

Joseph Clement Coll biography

Joseph Clement Coll (1881 - 1921; USA)
Joseph Clement Coll began his professional career working for the New York American in the late 1890s. He was soon working for magazines such as Collier's, Everybody's and the American Sunday Magazine. Coll's reputation stands mainly on his pen & ink story illustrations.

In contrast to most illustrators who worked in pen & ink, Coll achieved true tonal gradations in his illustrations by using pen strokes to build up a complete range of values. He was influenced by the Spanish pen & ink artist Daniel Vierge.

Clement Coll's other great qualities were his vivid imagination and the unique perspectives that he used in his works. Coll was also a painter and he often painted the cover or frontispiece of books which were reproduced in color and then drew the pen & inks to illustrate the text.
He was considered to be an ideal illustrator for authors such as Arthur Conan Doyle and other adventure writers.

His illustrations for books such as Talbot Mundy's King of the Khyber Rifles and Sax Rohmer's The Insidious Dr. Fu Manchu were widely reprinted for many years. Coll died in 1921 of appendicitis.
Joseph Clement Coll art
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L B Cole biography

L B Cole biography

L B Cole (1918 - 1995; USA)
Leonard Brandt Cole had worked as art director for a lithography outfit, before entering the comic book field during the Golden Age in the early 1940's. He was mainly a cover illustrator for titles like Suspense Comics and Contact Comics. In his early work, he always used basic, flat colors and produced what he called "poster color covers". Illustrating over 1500 covers, Cole drew everything from funny animals to superheroes to jungle girls and science-fiction. A science-fiction fan, Cole would often slip rocket ships and ray guns onto books such as 'Captain Flight' and 'Contact Comics' which were supposed to be devoted to contemporary aviation.

As for interior artwork, Cole did pencils and/or inks on several features for Holyoke Publications, Gilberton and Farrell. Cole also published comic books through Star Publications, producing various crime, terror, jungle and romance titles in the late 1940s and 1950s. He was art director and editor at Dell Publishing in the early 1960s. He has mainly done commercial art and design from the mid 1960s onwards, working among others on audio-visuals for University Films.
Source: Lambiek
L B Cole art
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Simon Coleby biography

Simon Coleby biography

Simon Coleby (born 2 March 1967; UK)
Simon Coleby is a British comic book artist who has worked mainly for British sci-fi comic 2000 AD and Marvel Comics.

Coleby started his mainstream work in the British comics industry in 1987, working at both 2000 AD and Marvel UK. His first published work was a cover for issue #222 of the latter's Transformers comic, depicting Carnivac and Springer. At 2000 AD he contributed heavily to Judge Dredd and Rogue Trooper spin-offs Friday and Venus Bluegenes, as well as becoming the lead artist on Low Life.

After working with Christos Gage on "Midnighter: Armageddon", he is working on the post-World's End relaunch of The Authority with writers Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning. He will also be working on Wildstorm's adaptation of Fringe because, according to editor, Ben Abernathy, "Simon Coleby is so far ahead on 'Authority' he has time to contribute 11 pages a month" and "Simon Coleby ... is definitely on the fast-track to becoming an 'elite' level artist."
Source: Wikipedia
Simon Coleby art
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Roger Coleman biography

Roger Coleman biography

Roger Coleman (known to be active 1960s - 1970s)
An accomplished book cover artist, Roger Coleman illustrated many Corgi, Pan and Ballantine paperback covers during the 1960s and 1970s. His art is particularly atmospheric. Now in his 80's (Feb 2013) he has reputedly become reclusive so not much more is known about him.

His cover work includes
Warbonnet Creek (EE Halleran, Corgi, 1962)
The Man with the Giolden Gun (Ian Fleming, Reader's Digest, 1966)
The Valley of Hanoi (Irwin R Blacker, Corgi, 1968)
A Town Like Alice (Nevil Shute, Pan, 1974)
The Legacy (Nevil Shute, Ballantine, 1973)
Most Secret (Nevil Shute, Pan & Ballantine, 1973)
Pied Piper (Nevil Shute, Pan & Ballantine, 1973)
Trustee from the Toolroom (Nevil Shute, Ballantine, 1972)
The Rainbow and the Rose (Nevil Shute, Ballantine, 1972)
Ruined City (Nevil Shute, Pan, 1974)
Landfall (Nevil Shute, Ballanntine, 1972)
Pastoral (Nevil Shute, Pan, 1974)
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
Roger Coleman art
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Henry Coller biography

Henry Coller biography

Henry Coller (21 December 1886 - 1958; London, UK)
Henry Coller was a commercial artist and illustrator whose fame rated just a few lines in a couple of post war art directories and also an entry in Who's Who in Art. My interest in him was aroused because among many other assignments Coller prepared the artwork for five series of cigarette cards issued between 1928 and 1934. These I will come back to a little later.

Born on 21 December 1886 in Wood Green, London, Henry was the son of the Rev W E Coller. It's a reasonable assumption that Henry shared his father's faith as his illustrative work in later years included a number of religious paintings. It is also a strong possibility that his father moved from London to Manchester as Henry was educated at Rusholme High School in that city before going on to study art at the Manchester School of Art.

In a series of articles that Coller wrote for The Artist magazine in 1936/37 under the heading ‘My Approach and Methods in Story Illustration' he revealed a desire to be a commercial artist rather than risk the vagaries of trying to get established in ‘fine art'. I quote: “I realized quite early that the readiest and most constant market was for line drawings for press advertising and so my later school of art years were spent in trying to master that most difficult tool, the pen. I concentrated, of course, on the pretty girl (the demand for that elusive being is always there) and I am still trying!”

Apart from that rather sensible early career decision Coller shows that he has a nice sense of humour. This is also apparent from a later statement regarding the type of work he was called upon to do. “For some years I was kept busy making line drawings to advertise every conceivable commodity – soaps, sports outfits, cigarettes, cough cures and baby foods – even a few ‘Kodak' drawings, until those responsible for that advertising realized that the logical thing to do was to advertise cameras by means of photographs.”

Whilst Coller admits he was treated well by most of his clients it was apparent then, and I doubt that much has changed today, that not every employer was strictly ethical. Prewar poster designers were probably pre-eminent among commercial artists and commanded the highest fees but some advertisers were obviously keen to get their art on the ‘cheap'. This is how Coller put it: “It is, however, a rather significant fact that although my drawings have been used quite a few times as posters, I have never yet been paid the price of a poster design.”

Nevertheless, Coller was good enough and industrious enough to be kept busy with a variety of assignments. His entry in Who's Who in Art (6th Edition) lists his specialties as, “sports sketches, drawings of sportsmen, men's fashions and other advertisements” and among his past work, “designs for Barney's Tobacco, Times Furnishing, Salute the Soldier (1943-44), Black & White Whisky (1950)”. The publications to which he contributed include Strand, Tatler, Windsor, Wide World, Passing Show, Pearsons, Sketch, Woman & Home, My Home, Women's Weekly, John Bull, Pictures That Teach and Home Journal.

Books that he illustrated include, Captain of Springdale by Dorita Fairlie Bruce (OUP), The Colour Book of Bible Stories by Joy Wheaton (Ward Lock), White Arab by Percy Westerman (Blackie) and, with others, Mrs Strang's Annual for Girls (OUP), The Wonder Book of Bible Stories, Moses in the Promised Land and The Life of Jesus, all by David Kyles (Ward Lock), and Picture Stories of the Old Testament by Mary Miller (Lutterworth).

The preponderance of religious books listed above, which probably date from the 1950s, suggest that Henry Coller managed to find a useful niche at a time when sketches for advertisements and magazine stories were starting to dry up. There are a number of religious paintings by Coller illustrated on the Look and Learn website which Steve feels may have been reprinted in Bible Story.

Henry Coller maintained a studio in London and gave an address at 38 Cleveland Square. A photo of him in his studio was published in The Artist magazine. Apart from his commercial work he found time to exhibit at the Royal Academy and also to paint portraits. One of these of Baron Pethick-Lawrence is in the collection of the National Portrait Gallery, London. He was a member of both the Chelsea Arts and London Sketch Clubs. He was married with four children and died in 1958.

(* A couple of additional notes: William Edward Coller was born in Trowbridge, Wiltshire, and was a schoolmaster in Blackburn, Lancashire, where the first two children of his children, Frederick Ernest W. (1876- ) and Ethel Jane (1880- ), were born. His wife, Jane (nee Watts, whom he had married in 1874), died in early 1880 at the age of 40, and W. E. Coller was married later that year to Elizabeth Anne Whitehead. Three further children followed, William Lonsdale (1882- ), born in Blackburn, and Edward (1884- ) and Henry, both born in Wood Green.

W. E. Coller continued to teach as a private tutor in English, Latin and French, but was also a Congregational Minister; in 1891 the family were living at Chorlton on Medlock, Manchester, in Lancashire; by 1901 they had moved to Moss Side, Manchester. Hence Henry Coller's attendance of a Manchester school.)
Source: Steve Holland
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Dennis Collins biography

Dennis Collins biography

Dennis Collins
The Perishers strip was the brainchild of the then Daily Mirror cartoon editor, Bill Herbert. Scripted by Ben Witham and drawn by Dennis Collins, it first appeared in the Manchester edition of the Mirror in February 1958.

Alas, the strip did not thrive and Bill enlisted the aid of advertising artist/writer Maurice Dodd. Maurice didn't work in the usual way of producing a written script from which the artist worked, but worked out his own ideas in rough pencilled layouts with action and dialogue in situ, while Dennis continued to execute finished drawings for the script. Ben Witham moved on to write gags for the popular single frame cartoon Useless Eustace.

The Collins - Dodd combination was successful and the Perishers moved into the national editions in October 1959. The partnership lasted until Dennis retired in 1983. Maurice then took on the complete execution of the strip, from idea to finished artwork, until 1992, when he once again went into partnership, this time with Bill Mevin who now executes the finished work.
Dennis Collins art
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Mike Collins biography

Mike Collins biography

Mike Collins ((born 1961; West Bromwich, UK)
Mike Collins is a Wales-based comic book artist and writer and has been working in comics since the mid-1980s.

Born in West Bromwich in 1961, he moved to Wales in 1985 after an abortive stab at a career in the Law, in London. Despite his training as a barrister, Mike decided that he enjoyed the fiction-based life of comic book characters over the fiction-based statements of clients. He is married to Karen Collins and father of 3 daughters, Bethan, Rebecca and Rhiannon and is currently placed in Cardiff. He is the Grandson of Military Medal winning World War One soldier Thomas Guinane.

UK comics --- in the mid to late 1980s, Mike wrote and drew strips for Marvel Comics United Kingdom division, amongst them; Spider-Man, Transformers, Doctor Who, and Zoids. He also worked on the celebrated UK weekly comic 2000 AD drawing Judge Dredd, Sláine and Rogue Trooper, as well as writing various Future Shocks.

US comics --- Mike was hired in the 'Second Wave' of British artists lured to the United States in the late 1980s. Through the 1990s, he worked primarily for DC Comics on their key titles - Batman, Superman, Flash, Teen Titans, Wonder Woman and the Justice League.

He also drew a series of licenced comics for the company, using various TSR, Inc./Dungeons and Dragons characters. A brief spell at Marvel saw Mike working on Uncanny X-Men (Key issue: #266, the first appearance of Gambit). He was back to DC though, to write and draw Peter Cannon, Thunderbolt, a revival of a 1960s Charlton Comics character.

Mike's primarily known for his work on TV and movie tie-in comics- for both Marvel and DC he has written and drawn Star Trek comics. In the late 1990s, he drew a Babylon 5 mini-series, "In Valen's Name", written by series creator J. Michael Straczynski and Peter David. A departure from most tie-in productions in that it actually serves as series 'canon' being based on an unused 3rd season script.

Mike is the artist (and sometime writer) on Panini Comics 'Doctor Who Magazine', Mike also wrote and drew a strip for the late, lamented Weekly World News, as well as co-creating the series American Gothic with Ian Edginton for 2000 AD.

Outside of comics Mike paints covers to a monthly series of downloadable Star Trek novels - the Starfleet Corps of Engineers, and works as a storyboard artist for both animation and live-action TV and movies.

Major work recently published is a 135 page adaptation of Charles Dickens' 'A Christmas Carol' for Classical Comics. His regular 'Doctor Who' collaborators, inker David Roach and colour artist James Offredi, worked with him on the book, with the script writer being Sean Michael Wilson. The graphic novel was chosen as one of the Top Ten Graphic Novels of the year by the Sunday Times and has gone on to sell well across by the UK and US, with several foreign language versions also coming out.

For BBC Books he has drawn The Only Good Dalek- the first graphic novel from the publisher, written by long time Doctor Who author Justin Richards, and a sequel/prequel to the TV episode Victory of the Daleks, The Dalek Project.

He wrote and designed the first ever Welsh language graphic novel - Mabinogi in association with Cartwyn Cymru in 2001, and is the first UK artist to produce a series of graphic novels for Norway with Gunnar Staalesen, featuring his celebrated private eye, Varg Veum. He works as a key illustrator for Welsh language school books using the comic strip medium, aimed at reluctant learners.

He supplied art for a number of cards in the Harry Potter Trading Card Game.

Mike is the lead singer of Cardiff based Tom Waits tribute band 'Tom Waits for no man'. Named by his daughter Rebecca, who is also a founding member alongside Viv Lock on guitar and Terry Williams on bass. They are a large contribution toward the lively and fast-growing Whitchurch music scene.

As well as comics work, Mike is a storyboard artist for Calon and Dinamo on children's TV shows, primarily the BAFTA winning Hana's Helpline, Igam Ogam and Cwm Teg. He has also worked on short live action movies, one of which -Day At The Beach- was BAFTA nominated in 2004. He also storyboarded on the Warhammer 40,000 CG film UltraMarines, and for Doctor Who Confidential.
Source: Wikipedia
Mike Collins art
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Joe Colquhoun biography

Joe Colquhoun biography

Joe Colquhoun (1926 - 1987; Middlesex, UK)
Joe Colquhoun was a British comics artist best known for his work on Charley's War in Battle Picture Weekly. He was also the first artist to draw Roy of the Rovers.

Born in Harrow, Middlesex, Joe Colquhoun served in the Royal Navy during World War II, and won a place at Kingston upon Thames School of Art on his return. His career in comics began in 1951 in Jungle Trails, and he went on to work for IPC Media on titles such as Lion, and later Tiger, where he drew Roy of the Rovers for six years, from 1954 to 1960, despite having no interest in football.

In the early 1970s he worked mainly for IPC's humour comics Buster and Cor!!, until Battle Picture Weekly came along in 1976. For Battle he drew Soldier Sharp: the Rat of the Rifles and Johnny Red before editor Dave Hunt assigned him to work on Pat Mills' First World War story Charley's War in 1978.

After Charley's War finished in 1986 Colquhoun drew for Mask until his death in 1987. Source: Wikipedia
Joe Colquhoun art
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Neville Colvin biography

Neville Colvin biography

Neville Maurice Colvin (17 December 1918 - 1991; New Zealand & UK)
Neville Colvin was born in New Zealand and began his career as a cartoonist in 1936 working for the Wellington Evening Post doing political and sports cartoons for a decade.

In 1946, facing political censorship, he left New Zealand and moved his family to London where he continued his cartooning career, primarily drawing sports and political cartoons for the News Chronicle, Daily Telegraph, Daily Express and Evening Standard until the mid-1950s.

He then decided to expand his scope to serialized newspaper strips drawing Ginger & Co. for Swift Weekly from 1960-62.

Colvin briefly drew the James Bond strip 1976=97, providing an ending to the story 'Ape of Diamonds' for syndication whilst author Jim Lawrence and artist Yaroslav Horak concentrated on a new series
for the Sunday Express. Colvin drew episodes 3384-3437 for the Daily Express, the strip ending on 22 January 1977.

Between 1977 and 1980, Colvin worked on a number of projects, including a Sunday strip featuring Modesty Blaise written by Peter O'Donnell, but the idea was dropped after Colvin had drawn seven episodes. Colvin subsequently replaced Romero on the daily strip on 27 May 1980 with the story 'Dossier on Pluto'.

He went on to draw 1,902 episodes - only slightly fewer than Jim Holdaway, the first artist on the Modesty Blaise strip- and his last strip appearing on 15 September 1986. One story, 'The Scarlet Maiden' (published in 1982), was the completion of the Sunday strip tryout from some years earlier.

Neville Colvin died in Camden, London, in 1991.
Source: Bear Alley & http://nevillecolvin.com/
Neville Colvin art

We also have original signed Modesty Blaise newspaper strips by JIM HOLDAWAY, JOHN M BURNS, PATRICK WRIGHT and ROMERO or click for all Modesty Blaise original ART in stock and not forgetting our highly collectable BOOKS ABOUT MODESTY including our latest The Art of Modesty Blaise (Limited Edition catalogue)
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Guy Colwell biography

Guy Colwell biography

Guy Colwell (born 28 March 1945; Oakland, California, USA)
Guy Colwell (born March 28, 1945, in Oakland, California) is an American full-time Figurative Social Surrealist painter and occasional underground cartoonist. Although not African-American himself, Colwell's comics often portray blacks in strong roles in stories of life on the streets. His paintings reflect on the human condition, economic inequality, injustice and alienation from the natural world.

Colwell studied art at the California College of Arts and Crafts. After completing two years there, he dropped out to travel and get some life and work experience. When he had worked an almost two-year stint as a sculptor for Mattel and was preparing his return to college, he was arrested for draft refusal and sentenced to two years in Federal Prison at Mcneil Island, Washington state. His experiences there and the period after his release were the genesis of his underground comix series Inner City Romance, begun in 1972. He was financially unable to continue art school as planned but deeply committed to painting as his life work, so was mainly self-taught thereafter. During the turbulent 1970s scene in San Francisco, Colwell worked as an illustrator for the underground paper Good Times and joined the commune that produced this weekly.

Colwell left the Good Times after the paper ceased publication and concentrated on doing paintings and a few comic books until the mid 80's. After this creative period marred by drug abuse, Colwell worked for Rip Off Press as a colorist, also contributing stories, artwork or production to many underground comic book titles and anthologies. He authored a second comic book series under the title "Doll" and completely stopped using drugs and alcohol while working at Rip Off Press.

In 1986, upon hearing of a cross-country peace march (The Great Peace March for Global Nuclear Disarmament), Colwell took an 18-month leave of absence from Rip Off Press to join what was touted by original Great Peace March organizer David Mixner as a major event in American history. While on the GPM, Colwell helped draw route maps for the marchers as well as creating art depicting marchers in their everyday lives. His route maps and drawings are part of the Swarthmore College Peace Collection.

On returning to Rip Off Press, by 1988 relocated to Auburn California, Colwell became strongly influenced by the great natural beauty and wildlife of the Sierra Mountains. Nature and animal subject matter would thereafter become much more prominent in his work and inspired a deeper exploration of surrealism. Travels throughout Europe on foot with a backpack and several trips to Africa have deepened this aspect of the pictures he produces. His artwork today is internationally recognized for powerful social commentary. The sometimes uncomfortable images he renders with sharp clarity reminiscent of Renaissance masterworks have received praise from art critics and have been sought after by collectors who are looking for something more than pleasant wall decorations.

Colwell currently is married and lives in Berkeley, California, where he devotes himself to creating personal and political art. His 2004 painting, The Abuse, is his depiction of the prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. This being Colwell's most controversial work, Lori Haigh, the owner of the San Francisco gallery where it was exhibited received death threats and was physically attacked. Her gallery also received damage from unknown persons, causing it to close permanently.

Examples of Colwell's original works can be seen at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento, California and the Pritikin Museum in San Francisco which features his magnum opus "Litter Beach". In September 2012, his work was featured in Juxtapoz magazine.
Source: Wikipedia
Guy Colwell art
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Tim Conrad biography

Tim Conrad biography

Tim Conrad (born 1951; USA)
Tim Conrad began his career in the mid-1970s, inking on Marvel titles like 'Kull' and 'Bran Mak Morn', and pencilling 'Conan' and stories for 'Unknown Worlds of Science Fiction'. He drew for Marvel's Epic Illustrated in the 1980s, doing painted comics like 'Almuric' and 'Toadswart'. Both appeared as graphic album later on.

He also worked for Pacific Comics, writing and drawing on titles like 'Alien Worlds', 'Captain Victory and the Galactic Rangers', 'Thrillogy' and 'Twisted Tales'. In the 1990s, he did work for Fantagor Press ('Horror in the Dark'), First Publishing ('Hunchback of the Notre Dame') and Eclipse Enterprises ('Down, Satan', 'Tapping the Vein').
Source: Lambiek
Tim Conrad art
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Noel Cook biography

Noel Cook biography

Noel Cook (1896 - 1981)
Noel Cook was born in New Zealand, but he moved to Australia. In 1924 his comic strip 'Roving Peter' appeared in the Sunday Times. In 1933, his 'Bobby and Betty', a text strip with the text underneath the pictures, was published in the Daily Telegraph. Cook worked for publisher K. G. Murray, where he produced many science fiction titles such as 'Pirate Planet', 'Peril Planet' and 'The Blue Ray'.

Later, he was employed by Offset Publishing, where he did 'Dick Dean - Star Reporter', 'Bobby and Betty', 'Peter' and 'Kokey Koala'. The latter was later published by Elmsdale Publications as 'Kokey Koala and his Magic Button', and became very popular with children. Noel Cook became staff artist with associated Newspapers in Sydney. He left overseas in 1950, and became art director of children's magazines by Fleetway Publications in London.
Source: Lambiek
Noel Cook art
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John Cooper biography

John Cooper biography

John Cooper (born 1942; UK)
John Cooper is an artist of UK action and war comics and worked for nearly all the British comics publications since the 1970s.

His credits vary from Look-in ('Doctor at Sea'), Disney to SHOOT! and 2000 AD. He is best known for the 'Johnny Red' from Battle magazine.

He was the artist of the first commisioned 'Judge Dredd' story, which was published much later due to its extreme violence. John Cooper is also active as an illustrator.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia & The Illustration Art Gallery
John Cooper art
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Harold Copping biography

Harold Copping biography

Harold Copping (25 August 1863 - 1 July 1932; UK)
Harold Copping was a British artist, born in Camden Town on 25 August 1863, the second son of Edward Copping (a journalist) and Rose Heathilla (nee Prout), the daughter of J. S. Prout, the water-colour artist.His brother, Arthur E. Copping, became a noted author, journalist and traveller.

Copping grew up in St. Pancras. He studied at the Royal Academy Schools and won a Landseer Scholarship to study in Paris. He was a successful painter and illustrator, living in Croydon and Hornsey during the early years of his career.

Copping was a notable illustrator of Biblical scenes and in order to achieve some authenticity in his work, notably an illustrated edition of The Bible published in 1910, he travelled to Palestine and Egypt. This version was a best-seller and led to many more commissions for Copping.

A trip to Canada inspired the collection of watercolour sketches Canadian Pictures. Amongst the many books he illustrated were The Gospel of the Old Testament, Scenes in the Life of Our Lord, Scripture Picture Books, The Pilgrim’s Progress, Tales from Shakespeare, Character Sketches from Dickens, Longfellow and others.

Copping was married to Violet Amy Prout in 1888, and had children Ernest Noel (1889- ), Romney (1891-1910) and Violet (1891-1892). Following his wife’s death in 1894 (aged only 29), Copping was married a second time, to Edith Louise Mothersill, in 1897 and had children Joyce (1901-1934) and John Clarence (1914-1977).

Copping lived for many years at The Studio, Shoreham, near Sevenoaks, Kent. He died at home on 1 July 1932, aged 68, after some years of ill-health and a Memorial Fund was set up in his name to provide for his widow and children, raising over £500. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Richard Corben biography

Richard Corben biography

Richard Corben (born 1940)
Born in Missouri, Richard is best known for his illustrated fantasies in Heavy Metal (Métal Hurlant) magazine, and he is the celebrated author and artist behind the popular graphic novel Den series and the the creator of Jeremy Brood. In a varied career, Corben's work also includes the cover of Meat Loaf's Bat out of Hell album.
Richard Corben art
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Philip Corke biography

Philip Corke biography

Philip Corke
British artist who worked on the Trigan Empire for a year in 1974-75. Previously he had illustrated a number of books for North Cheap publisher’s Young World Productions. Following this brief sojourn into comics, he returned to illustrating books and posters, mostly historical subjects, also penning titles for the Longman Butterfly Books series.
Philip Corke art
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Graham Coton biography

Graham Coton biography

Graham Coton (1926 - 2003)
Graham Coton's metier was the Second World War. Although he started as a strip artist by drawing Kit Carson for Cowboy Comics Library and later drew four short strips for the Thriller Comics Library (an adventure of Gulliver for no.5, a Dick Turpin strip for no. 8 and two Three Musketeer strips in issues 12 and 26), it was not until he started drawing Captain Phantom, the World War II Master Spy, for Knockout in 1953, that he really came into his own. Some of these strips were later reprinted in Thriller Comics Library with the lead character renamed Spy 13.

Coton was very much a new force in comics when he first appeared, bringing with him a violent, ultra-tough approach. Coton's two short Musketeer strips are interesting mainly for their story lines- particularly the reunion with Aramis in Musketeers Ride Again (no. 26) - for the artwork is not really in tune with the swashbuckling genre.

Coton will be mainly remembered as far as comic art is concerned for his car racing strips in Tiger, his superb war strips in Top Spot and, most of all, for his dynamic covers for the War Libraries. Graham Coton was born in Woolwich, London and was self-taught, although he admits to attending Goldsmith's College of Art in London, which he says was a "disaster".  Biography extract courtesy of David Ashford and Norman Wright.
Graham Coton art

See illustrators issue 6 for a Graham Coton feature article.
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Ernest Crofts biography

Ernest Crofts biography

Ernest Crofts (1847 - 1911)
Ernest Crofts art
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Robert Crumb biography

Robert Crumb biography

Robert Dennis Crumb (born 30 August 1943; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA)
Robert Crumb is an American cartoonist and musician. His work displays a nostalgia for American folk culture of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and satire of contemporary American culture. His work has attracted controversy, especially for his depiction of women and non-white races.

Crumb first rose to prominence after the 1968 debut of Zap Comix, which was the first successful publication of the underground comix era. Countercultural characters such as Fritz the Cat and Mr. Natural, and the images from his "Keep on Truckin'" strip, were among his popular creations. Following the decline of the underground, he moved towards biographical and autobiographical subjects, while refining his drawing style, a heavily crosshatched pen-and-ink style inspired by late 19th- and early 20th-century cartooning. Much of his work appeared in a magazine he founded, Weirdo (1981–1993), which was one of the most prominent publications of the alternative comics era. He is married to cartoonist Aline Kominsky-Crumb, with whom he has frequently collaborated.

In 1991, Crumb was inducted into the comic book industry's Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame.

Robert Crumb was born on August 30, 1943 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to a Catholic household of English and Scottish ancestry, and is a descendant on his mother's side of former U.S. president Andrew Jackson. His father, Charles V. Crumb, authored the book Training People Effectively, and was a Combat Illustrator for 20 years in the United States Marine Corps. His mother, Beatrice, was a housewife who reportedly abused diet pills and amphetamines. Charles and Beatrice's marriage was unhappy and the children were frequent witnesses to their parents' arguments. The couple had four other children: sons Charles Junior and Maxon, both of whom suffered from mental illness; and daughters Sandra and Carol.

Inspired by the works of Walt Kelly, Fleischer Brothers animation, and others, Crumb and his brothers drew their own comics and sold them door to door. At fifteen, Crumb became obsessed with collecting jazz and blues records from the 1920s to the 1940s.

Crumb's first job, in 1962, was drawing novelty greeting cards for American Greetings in Cleveland, Ohio. There he met a group of young bohemians such as Buzzy Linhart, Liz Johnston, and Harvey Pekar. Johnston introduced him to his future wife, Dana Morgan, whom he married in 1964. Dissatisfied with greeting card work, he tried to sell cartoons to comic book companies, who showed little interest in his work. In 1965, cartoonist Harvey Kurtzman printed some of Crumb's work in the humor magazine he edited, Help!. Crumb moved to New York, intending to work with Kurtzman, but Help! ceased publication shortly after. Crumb briefly illustrated bubblegum cards for Topps before returning to Cleveland and American Greetings.

In 1966, Crumb and Dana took LSD, after which Crumb increasingly found his job at American Greetings difficult to bear. In 1967, encouraged by the reaction to some drawings he had published in underground newspapers, including Philadelphia's Yarrowstalks, he and two friends left for San Francisco, the center of the counterculture movement; he called Dana to follow him in 1968. His Zap Comix #1 appeared early that year, followed by #2 and #0; later issues also featured work by Rick Griffin, Victor Moscoso, Spain Rodriguez, Robert Williams, and S. Clay Wilson. The countercultural work was filled with gratuitous sex, drugs, and violence; it sold well, and marked the beginning of the underground comix era.

Crumb was a prolific cartoonist in the late 1960s and early 1970s. He produced much of his best-known work then, including his Keep on Truckin' strip, and strips featuring characters such as the bohemian Fritz the Cat, spiritual guru Mr. Natural, and oversexed African-American stereotype Angelfood McSpade. In 1978, he divorced Dana and married cartoonist Aline Kominsky, with whom Crumb has frequently collaborated.

Crumb and family moved to a small village near Sauve in southern France in 1991. In 2009, after four years of work, Crumb produced The Book of Genesis an unabridged illustrated graphic novel version of the biblical Book of Genesis. Source: Wikipedia
Robert Crumb art
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Cyrus Cuneo biography

Cyrus Cuneo biography

Cyrus Cuneo
Cyrus Cuneo was chosen by art instructor Percy V. Bradshaw as one of the artists to illustrate "The Art of the Illustrator", a collection of twenty portfolios demonstrating six stages of a single painting or drawing by twenty different artists and published in 1918.
Cyrus Cuneo art
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Cynicus (Martin Anderson) biography

Cynicus (Martin Anderson) biography

Cynicus (Martin Anderson) (1854 - 1932; Tayport, Fife, Scotland)
Victorian artist Martin Anderson (who we know as Cynicus) first met success as a pioneering satirical cartoonist and then later as a comic postcard illustrator. In 1902 Anderson founded his postcard publishing business and from humble beginnings in Tayport became a star of the London Art Scene.

While the Cynicus Publishing Company prospered and became a significant local employer the success was short lived and, by 1911, he faced financial ruin.

Anderson and his sister subsequently lived in poverty in the mansion home, (known locally as "Cynicus Castle") that he had built on the proceeds of his postcard business. He died in 1932 and was buried in an unmarked grave, his very grand but neglected home being demolished seven years later. A sad end.
Source: About Postcards
Cynicus (Martin Anderson) art
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Santo D'Amico biography

Santo D'Amico biography

Santo D'Amico (11 December 1927 - 25 October 1995; Italy)
The Italian artist Santo D'Amico worked for a variety of Italian and French publishers during the 1960s and 1970s.

After studying at the Liceo Artistico, Santo D'Amico moved on to study Architecture. While still studying, he presented his drawings and comics to several publishers. He had his first publications in Il Giornalino, doing lots of illustrations and "cinema novels" like 'Sifrid', 'Capitani Coraggiosi' and 'Guglielmo Tell'. While also cooperating with Paoline publishers, he began a collaboration with Il Vittorioso, for which he illustrated series like 'Na'Giamba', 'Speron d'Oro', 'Squadriglia Acrobatica' and 'Jolly', the latter in cooperation with Roberto Diso. Other work included Swiss Family Robinson which appeared in the UK comic Princess Tina in the early 1970s.

For the French market, he worked mostly with Diso on so-called "petits formats". With Diso, he created 'Dan Panther' (1964-69), as well as 'Atoman contro Killer' (1965-66). He also worked on series like 'Perceval' (1959-60) and 'Lancelot' (also in cooperation with Diso, scripts by Jean Ollivier, 1965-87). D'Amico has illustrated 40 episodes of 'The Phantom'. He spent the final years of his career working for Il Giornalino.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia & Illustration Art Gallery
Santo D'Amico art
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Gino D'Antonio biography

Gino D'Antonio biography

Luigi (Gino) D'Antonio (16 March 1927 - 2006; Milan, Italy)
Gino D'Antonio came to the UK to work for Studio D'Ami on British comics. He illustrated "No Rest for Biggles" in Junior Mirror and "Biggles Takes Charge" in Express Weekly. His big break came when he drew Buffalo Bill in the Comet. He went on to War Picture Library where his first strip was Red Devils in 1957. He also drew Paddy Payne in Lion and strips in Valiant.

His work for Tell Me Why and Look and Learn included classic novel adaptations such as Quo Vadis by Henry Sienkiewicz, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne and A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens.

Luigi (Gino) D' Antonio, writer and artist, was born in Milan on March 16, 1927. He began his career almost by chance. In the mid-forties, he was the neighbor of Mario Oriani (a writer on Corriere dei Ragazzi) who helped him to start his career as author and artist. D'Antonio was always passionate about drawing, and began his career on Jess Dakota, (Joe Dakota in France) at Della Casa publishers, in a style obviously inspired by Milton Caniff's Steve Canyon.

In 1950, he became acquainted with Mario Leone and drew the series Angeli della strada (based on Leone's story). From 1951 to 1957, he collaborated on the magazine Il Vittorioso. In 1952 he began his most famous series, Pecos Bill, a western series created by Guido Martina and Raffaele Paparella. In 1954, he drew many illustrations for the weekly magazine Domenica del Corriere and some episodes of the second series of El Kid, another western, based on stories by Gianluigi Bonelli (published by Audace (the first incarnation of Sergio Bonelli Editore)). In 1955-56, still for Audacity and with Bonelli, he drew some episodes of I Tre Bill and also contributed toWestern, a review published by Dardo.

In 1955 he became acquainted with Rinaldo D'Ami who headed his own studio with a team of artists who worked for the English market. Within the D'Ami studio, D'Antonio illustrated dozens of stories for Junior Mirror, Junior Express, Top Spot, Thriller Picture Library (Battler Britton Target Berlin - 1958), Cowboy Picture Library (Gun Rule - 1962), Fleetway Super Library and War Picture Library, and drew covers for Eagle and Boys World. He also drew adaptations for traditional literature (Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea, Moby Dick, Quo Vadis, Tale of Two Cities, The Odysee) for Tell me Why and World of Wonder. These latter being colour illustrations which he had not attempted before.

In 1966 he created Il storia del West (History of the West) for Italian publisher Bonelli (which was still called Araldo at this time).

In 1970, he started his collaboration with Il Giornalino working with texts by Alberto Ongaro, and drew episodes of Jim Lacy, the short history of Il Soldato Casciella, created the character of Susanna (for which he wrote all the episodes and collaborated on the drawings with his friends Renato Polese and Ferdinando Tacconi). His final project for this year was to finish the adaptation of Jules Verne's The Mysterious Island started by Franco Caprioli, a project that was halted due to the death of the author.

In 1971 Storia del West won the Three Days prize, and in 1974 the ANAF prize, at the International Show of Comics.

In 1976, he both wrote and drew Uomo dello Zululand, the second volume of the collection of hard-bound albums A Uomo un' will avventura, (A Man, an Adventure, which appeared in the French Mon Journal in a larger size) published by Cepim (another incarnation of Bonelli). In 1977 and 1978, he received the ANAF prize for "Best Italian Story Writer".

D'Antonio also wrote and drew all the episodes of the war series Il mercenario. In 1980, at the International Exhibition of Comics at Rapallo, he received the prize for the Best Story Writer. In 1983, he drew, in alternation with Tacconi, the covers of Full, the first Italian experimental comic (quickly abandoned) by Bonelli.

In 1984-85, D'Antonio's new series, a western entitled Bella & Bronco, launched (it appeared in El Bravo in France). The episodes were only 64 pages in length, but in a format slightly larger than traditional Bonelli size. The originality for this series stemmed from the fact that the heroes were women, which is rather rare as regards westerns. In 1986, D'Antonio turned his hand to another popular Italian series Orient Express, where he created the character Mac lo Straniero with drawings by Tacconi. He drew three episodes in this series: Il lungo viaggio, Verdi Campi di Fiandra and Ultimo atto. In 1986 he created Uomini senza Gloria (Men without Glory), a large historical fresco on the Second World War. In 1987, he became comics editor of the newspaper Il Giornalino, a position which he relinquished in 1992.

In 1989, he wrote a script for Nick Raider, the new Bonelli character created by Claudio Nizzi. Since then he has written many episodes for this series.

In 1996, at the International Show of Comics at Lucca, Italy, he received the title of "Master of the Comics" for his life time's achievement in comics. In 1999, he worked on the new Bonelli series: Julia as a writer with illustrations by Giancarlo Berardi. Gino D'Antonio died in 2006.

Mike McMahon, the 2000AD artist of Judge Dredd, said of him "The only artist whose work I copied and traced on a regular basis when I was growing up".
Source: DanDare.info and Illustration Art Gallery
Gino D'Antonio art
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Benoit Dartigues biography

Benoit Dartigues biography

Benoît Dartigues; Sabres, Landes, France
In the 1980s, after studying architecture, Benoît (Benedict) Dartigues, alias BuD, launched into Comics. He began in To Follow and Heavy Metal but soon moved into press illustration and (using watercolours) advertising. In 2000, following an accident, he settled in Aquitaine and created a small publishing house but left after a few years to return to illustration. In 2010, under the pseudonym BuD he started the erotic series "Girls of Joy, Woman of Dreams". Then he turned towards illustration for Youth magazines (Bayard, Fleurus, Hachette, …).

He works in digital painting, ie he designs, draws and paints his pictures using a computer. The works are then Giclee printed as limited editions on canvas or art paper. This process is controlled by EPSON France, who guarantee the authenticity and provenance of each work by the artist.

In 2009, after the passage of Hurricane Klaus and the devastation of a nearby local forest had left vast empty spaces, he took up his brushes and discovered a new form of expression for him, acrylic:

"I've always been fascinated by the sky and the clouds, whether on sea or in the air. Bad photographer, I try since childhood to draw and paint what I see and feel. Today I seek in my work to capture the light and the materials around me and to compose a palette with which I build my paintings. One can then see a hyperrealistic image or even an abstract composition. But the important thing is that it exudes emotion that I want to translate."
Benoît Dartigues art
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Chris Davey biography

Chris Davey biography

Chris Davey; Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, UK
An airbrush artist with years of experience, Chris has become Osprey Publishing's principal illustrator of RAF aircraft, having produced the profiles for over a dozen books since 1994. His most recent work included Aces 27 and 30, and Combat AIrcraft 14 and 19. He is particularly adept at 'big' aircraft like the Halifax and Sunderland.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
Chris Davey art
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Gordon Davies biography

Gordon Davies biography

Gordon C Davies (6 May 1923 - 1994; Kent, UK)
Gordon C. Davies was a prolific book cover artist from the 1950s to the 1980s, most notably on a great many science fiction books as he was a very good artist of technology, from trains and planes to spaceships, and military subjects which included hardware.

I became aware of Davies' work when I began collecting SF books published by Curtis Warren; he worked prolifically for them (the rates were low); Phil Harbottle was a big fan of his work and when we were writing Vultures of the Void was of the opinion that it was Davies' covers that sold Curtis Warren's SF line, not the quality of the stories (which was also low... sometimes very low!). Davies produced over 40 covers for Curtis in 1952-54. In 1954, a book appeared under the byline Gordon Davies, although it was probably not by the artist.

Davies also worked for various other publishers around the same period including Scion, Authentic Science Fiction, Futuristic Science Stories, Panther Books and Brown Watson. The cheap paperback boom came to an end in 1954 and Davies had to find work elsewhere, including features for Daily Mail Boys Annual, Swift Annual, Eagle Annual and centre-spreads for the Eagle weekly. He continued to produce covers for Pan Books and New English Library, notably for titles by Arthur C. Clarke and Robert A. Heinlein.

Davies —full name Gordon Charles H. Davies— was born in West Derby, Lancashire, on 6 May 1923. [I believe he was the son of Henry and Martha (nee Rawlinson), who were married in West Derby in 1922.] Davies married Marjorie P. Mason in Surrey in 1951, Judy R. Hunt in Canterbury, Kent, in 1988.

He lived at 155 Sunningvale Avenue, Biggin Hill, Kent before moving to Woodlands Farm, Lyminge, Kent, in about 1970, where he lived until his death in 1994, aged 70.
Source: Bear Alley
Gordon Davies art
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Jack Davis biography

Jack Davis biography

John Burton Davis, Jr. (2 December 1924 - 27 July 2016); Atlanta, USA
Jack Davis was an American cartoonist and illustrator, known for his advertising art, magazine covers, film posters, record album art and numerous comic book stories. He was one of the founding cartoonists for Mad in 1952. His cartoon characters are characterized by extremely distorted anatomy, including big heads, skinny legs and extremely large feet.

Jack Davis was born in Atlanta, Georgia. As a child, he adored listening to Bob Hope on the radio, and tried to draw him, despite not knowing what Hope looked like.

Davis saw comic book publication at the age of 12 when he contributed a cartoon to the reader's page of Tip Top Comics #9 (December 1936). After drawing for his high school newspaper and yearbook, he spent three years in the U.S. Navy, where he contributed to the daily Navy News.

Attending the University of Georgia on the G.I. Bill, he drew for the campus newspaper and helped launch an off-campus humor publication, Bullsheet, which he described as "not political or anything but just something with risque jokes and cartoons." After graduation, he was a cartoonist intern at The Atlanta Journal, and he worked one summer inking Ed Dodd's Mark Trail comic strip, a strip which he later parodied in Mad as Mark Trade.

In 1949, he illustrated a Coca-Cola training manual, a job that gave him enough cash to buy a car and drive to New York. Attending the Art Students League of New York, he found work with the Herald Tribune Syndicate as an inker on Leslie Charteris's The Saint comic strip, drawn by Mike Roy in 1949-50. His own humor strip, Beauregard, with gags in a Civil War setting, was carried briefly by the McClure Syndicate. After rejections from several comic book publishers, he began freelancing for William Gaines' EC Comics in 1950, contributing to Tales from the Crypt, The Haunt of Fear, Frontline Combat, Two-Fisted Tales, The Vault of Horror, Piracy, Incredible Science Fiction, Crime Suspenstories, Shock Suspenstories and Terror Illustrated.

In 2011, Davis told the Wall Street Journal about his early career and his breakthrough with EC: "I was about ready to give up, go home to Georgia and be either a forest ranger or a farmer. But I went down to Canal Street and Lafayette, up in an old rickety elevator and through a glass door to Entertaining Comics where Al Feldstein and Bill Gaines were putting out horror (comic) books. They looked at my work and it was horrible and they gave me a job right away!""Every time you went in to see Bill Gaines, he would write you a check when you brought in a story. You didn't have to put in a bill or anything. I was very, very hungry and I was thinking about getting married. So I kept the road pretty hot between home and Canal Street. I would go in for that almighty check, go home and do the work, bring it in and get another check and pick up another story."

Davis was particularly noted for his depiction of the Crypt-Keeper in the horror comics, revamping the character's appearance from the more simplistic Al Feldstein version to a tougher, craggier, mangier man with hairy warts, salivating mouth and oversized hands and feet, who usually didn't wear shoes. Among the classic horror tales he illustrated were "Foul Play" which was cited in Dr. Fredric Wertham's book Seduction of the Innocent for its depiction of "a comic book baseball game". Others, like "Tain't The Meat, It's The Humanity", "Death Of Some Salesman", "Fare Tonight Followed By Increasing Clottiness", "Tight Grip" and "Lower Berth" were Crypt-Keeper classics. He did the covers for every issue of Crypt from issue #29 to #46. In his work for Harvey Kurtzman's war comics he tackled a variety of subjects and had a particular affinity for depicting American Civil War stories.

He also did many covers for Frontline Combat, Two-Fisted Tales and Incredible Science Fiction as well. The editors, William M. Gaines, Albert B. Feldstein and Harvey Kurtzman have said he was the fastest artist they had in those days, completely penciling and inking three pages a day at times, or more. His use of the brush to create depth and mood was unique and memorable. His wrinkled clothing, scratchy lines and multi-layered layouts were so popular in the 1950s, that other artists at rival companies began copying the style—notably, Howard Nostrand in Harvey's horror comics. In the late 1950s, Davis drew Western stories for Atlas Comics. His 1963 work on the Rawhide Kid (#33-35) was his last for non-humor comic books.

His style of wild, free-flowing brushwork and wacky characters made him a perfect choice when Harvey Kurtzman launched Mad as a zany, satirical EC comic book in 1952. He appeared in most of the first 30 issues of Mad, all 12 issues of Panic and even some work in Cracked. Davis contributed to other Kurtzman magazines—Trump, Humbug and Help!—eventually expanding into illustrations for record jackets, movie posters, books and magazines, including Time and TV Guide. He completed an 88-card set of humorous cartoons called Wacky Plaks, which Topps Chewing Gum Co. released in 1959. In 1961, he wrote, drew, and edited his own comic book, Yak Yak, for Dell Comics. In 1965, he illustrated Meet The North American Indians by Elizabeth Payne, published by Random House as part of their children's Step Up Books line. (ISBN 0-394-80060-5). He returned as a regular contributor to Mad magazine in the mid 1960s and appeared in nearly every issue after that for decades. He also drew many covers for the magazine, especially in the 1970s.

Davis also had a regular comic strip feature in Pro Quarterback magazine in the early 1970s entitled Superfan, which was written by his Mad cohort, Nick Meglin.

Davis first came to the attention of TV Guide in 1965 when he illustrated an eight-page advertising supplement for NBC's TV lineup, which featured icons such as Johnny Carson, Dean Martin and fictional characters such as Dr. Kildare, Napoleon Solo and Maxwell Smart. His first cover for the magazine came in 1968, when he depicted a tribute to Andy Griffith, in which the actor was hoisted on the shoulders of his costars, Don Knotts and Jim Nabors. Davis recalls, "Every assignment was a thrill because TV Guide was the top magazine in the country. I couldn't wait to get in my little MG and drive from New York out to the magazine's offices in Radnor, Pennsylvania, to show the editors my latest design. I felt like the luckiest guy in the world." Davis would contribute 23 covers for TV Guide between 1968 and 1981. In 2013 the magazine honored him in a retrospective in which it recounted his history with the publication, and spotlighted some of his most memorable covers, including those depicting Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In (March 28, 1970), Davis' childhood hero Bob Hope for a cover on Hope's history with the Oscars (April 10, 1971) and Bonanza (August 14, 1971). Years later, while watching a TV interview of Hope, Davis was gratified to notice that his Hope cover was displayed on the back wall of the comedian's office; "it was one of the proudest moments of my life," recalled Davis.

Davis created the cartoon bee which (in decal form) appears on the flanks of all the buses in the Bee-Line running from Westchester to New York City. A Westchester resident at the time, Davis lived directly adjacent to one of the Bee Line's bus routes, and he mentioned in an interview how gratifying it was to see his own artwork drive past his window several times every day. Similar synchronicity happened when Mad moved to 1700 Broadway, where the magazine's fifth-floor production department was next to a wall that had previously been the location, only three feet away, of an immense Davis cartoon for a bank, an advertisement that towered six stories over 53rd Street.

Like fellow Mad alumnus Paul Coker, Jr., Davis also contributed to Rankin-Bass productions; his character designs are featured in Mad Monster Party, The King Kong Show, The Coneheads and the cartoon series The Jackson 5ive. For Raid insecticide, Davis created the animated bug that screamed "Raid?!" Phil Kimmelman Associates created several commercials designed by Davis and animated in his style.

Davis produced the artwork for the poster for the 1963 comedy chase film It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (which he then parodied for the cover of the Mad paperback "It's a World, World, World, World Mad"). When the Criterion Collection released the film on DVD and Blu-ray in 2014, Davis provided illustrations for the accompanying booklet.

Davis' artwork for the comedy Western Viva Max! (1969) formed the centerpiece of that film's promotional campaign, and he did the same for the film Kelly's Heroes in 1970. His poster for Robert Altman's The Long Goodbye (1973) presented the film in a comic light.

In 1963 Davis produced a work of cover art for the Richard Wolfe album, Many Happy Returns of the Day! released by MGM Records, and designed the Homer and Jethro album, Homer and Jethro Go West (RCA Victor).

In 1966, Davis created the cover art for the Johnny Cash album, Everybody Loves a Nut.

Davis was inducted into the Will Eisner Hall of Fame in 2003. He also received the National Cartoonists Society's Milton Caniff Lifetime Achievement Award in 1996. A finalist for inclusion in the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1990, 1991 and 1992, he received the National Cartoonists Society's Advertising Award for 1980 and their Reuben Award for 2000.

In June 2002, Davis had a retrospective exhibition of his work at the Society of Illustrators in New York. He was inducted into the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame in 2005.

In 1989, Davis was commissioned by the United States Postal Service to design the 25-cent Letter Carriers stamp. There was some concern that the cartoon would offend some letter carriers as being too informal and not respectful of their position. However, the President of the Letter Carriers Union gave his blessing, and the stamp was well received. Although postal policy does not allow artists to portray living persons on stamps, one of the carriers in the stamp is an unmistakable self-portrait of Davis.

As of May 2014, he is the only surviving artist of the EC horror comics. Their colourist (who did no story art for EC), Marie Severin is also still living. Wallace Wood died in 1981 and Reed Crandall died the following year. Bernie Krigstein died in 1990 and Graham Ingels died the following year. Joe Orlando died in 1998. Johnny Craig and George Evans died in 2001. Jack Kamen and Will Elder died in 2008, Frank Frazetta and Al Williamson died in 2010. Harry Harrison died in 2012 and Al Feldstein died in April 2014.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery & Wikipedia
Jack Davis art
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Reginald B Davis biography

Reginald B Davis biography

Reginald Ben Davis (10 December 1907 - 1998; UK)
A regular illustrator of nature subjects and animals for Look and Learn and Treasure. Some of his Look and Learn illustrations were collected in Animal Partnerships by Maurice Burton (1969).

Born on 10 December 1907, Davis was a commercial artist before the Second World War working for Byron Studios. After the war he became a regular artist for School Friend, drawing the adventures of castaway schoolgirl 'Jill Crusoe'. Amongst his other strips for the same paper were 'Jon of the Jungle', 'Kay of Cedar Creek', 'Phantom Ballerina' and 'Penny of Maywood Stables'.

Davis was also a regular cover artist for Schoolgirls' Picture Library from its debut in June 1957 and later illustrated text stories for Girls' Crystal in the early 1960s. From 1962 he concentrated on colour illustration work and only occasionally returned to comic strips. In the 1970s he concentrated on illustrating wildlife books. Davis lived in Liphook, Hampshire, where he died in late 1998, aged 90.
Source: Look and Learn
Reginald B Davis art
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Al Davison biography

Al Davison biography

Al Davison; Newcastle, UK
Al Davison is an English comic book writer and artist from Newcastle, England. He now resides in Coventry, where he runs The Astral Gypsy, his studio and Comic shop with his wife Maggie.

He is most famous for his autobiographical graphic novel The Spiral Cage (Renegade Press, 1988, longer version Titan Books, 1990), Absolute edition from Active Images 2003 which describes his lifelong struggle with spina bifida and his rise to successful comic book creator, martial arts scholar, film maker, and performer. The Spiral Cage featured in Tony Isabella's 1000 Comic Books You Must Read.

He is the subject of a documentary, also called The Spiral Cage, directed by Paul W.S. Anderson.
Source: Wikipedia
Al Davison art
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Leo Davy biography

Leo Davy biography

Leo Davy (1924 - 1987; UK)
To the end of his life, Leo Davy shunned art dealers and critics, believing that painting spoke for itself. His late works provide a connection between his landscapes, inspired by the north Cornwall coast which he has made his home, and the tradition of abstraction to which he has been a contributor. An assessment of the significance of his work to British art as a whole has yet to be made but, "Leo Davy is vital to our understanding of the British abstract tradition," Barry Barker, Arnolfini Director.
Leo Davy art
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Neville Dear biography

Neville Dear biography

Neville Dear; UK
A prolific artist for Look and Learn, illustrating a wide variety of historical subjects and various series including 'Disasters That Shook the World' (1963), 'By the Rivers of Babylon' (1964), 'They Made Headlines' (1964), 'Epic Stories of the Iron Road' (1965) and others. In 1949, Dear and two other students from the Royal College of Art were commissioned to decorate the walls of the children's section of the Chelsea Public Library.

In the 1950s he began producing illustrations for William Collins, including work for Collins' Magazine, Collins Boys' Annual and books, including Showell Styles' 'Tiger Patrol' series.

As well as his magazine illustrations for Look and Learn, Ranger, Argosy, Picture Post and others, Dear also worked for Oxford University Press, Wheaton, Hodder & Stoughton, Corgi, and Eyre Methuen. With others he illustrated The Hamlyn Bible for Children (1974) and he was a regular illustrator for Reader's Digest's condensed books.
Source: Look and Learn
Neville Dear art
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Arturo del Castillo biography

Arturo del Castillo biography

Arturo Perez Del Castillo (1925 - 1992)
The Chilean artist del Castillo's pen and ink work has been highly admired for many years. In the late 1950s he worked for Fleetway Publications, defining the art of fine penmanship on such strips as The Three Musketeers and The Man in the Iron Mask

By the 1960s he was producing westerns for comics such as Top Spot, Ranger and Cowboy Picture Library; Garret (1962 - scripts by Ray Collins: pseudonym of Argentinian writer Eugenio Zappietro); Dan Dakota, Kendall (sheriff of Dodge City) , Larrigan (reprinted in both Fleetway's Lone Rider Picture Library and Cowboy Picture Library nos. 455, 463, 467), and Los tres mosqueteros en el Oeste. In 1974, again with Ray Collins he created Il Cobra, and with Oesterheld Loco Sexton. His most famous creation remains the western strip, Randall: The Killer, began in 1957.

del Castillo became famous for his skilful and detailed penwork, and in particular for his cross-hatching technique. In the late 1950s, del Castillo drew a number of comic strip adaptations of Alexandre Dumas' novels, such as The King's Musketeers, which first appeared in Film Fun and was then reprinted in Lion Comic, and The Man in the Iron Mask that also appeared in Fleetway's Lion Comic.

However, his main subject and greatest love, was always that of the western. One of his earliest western characters - Ringo - appeared in the last three editions of Top Spot (January 2nd, 9th and 16th 1960). Whilst Dan Dakota - Lone Gun appeared in Ranger comic. He also contributed at least one story to Cowboy Picture Library - CPL 467: Ghost Town.

In the mid-sixties, he participated in the "Bande Dessinée et figuration narrative" exhibition in Paris. The exhibition was held at the Musée d'Art at the Louvre.

Arturo del Castillo retired in 1989 and died in Buenos Aires in 1992.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
Arturo del Castillo art
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Pino Dell'Orco biography

Pino Dell'Orco biography

Pino Dell'Orco; Rome, Italy
Pino Dell'Orco was an aeroplane-obsessed schoolboy who grew up in Rome reading the comics of the legendary German/Italian artist Curt Caesar.

Dell'Orco was something of a prodigy and as a teenager he became an apprentice to Enrico DeSeta before joining the Favalli studios to paint movie posters. Dell’Orco had absorbed DeSeta's style so completely that he could (and indeed did) paint entire posters in his style, which DeSeta would then sign! In the late 1950s Favalli died and the studio broke up with most of the artists relocating to Milan to join the D’Ami studio.

Dell'Orco, on the other hand, moved to London where he joined the Bryan Colmer agency. After a few years painting paperback covers Colmer approached Dell'Orco about the possibility of creating war covers for Fleetway and he jumped at the chance, going on to paint over 300 of them throughout the 1960s. As it turns, some of his fellow cover artists were his old colleagues at the Favalli studio -- Allessandro Biffignandi and Nino Caroselli, now based in Milan, though bizarrely the fact that they ended up working on the same comics was pure coincidence.

Pino Dell'Orco's paintings were invariably masterpieces of design and this is particularly true of his many covers for Air Ace. Working on artboard roughly the size of a U.S. original comic book page he had a far more minimalist approach than DeGaspari. His paintings often employed quite thin blocks, even using the bare surface of the board as a background colour and employing quick flicks of the brush, charcoal or pencil for details. They have a dynamic immediacy that flies off the page - but even more than that - it is their composition that really makes them stand out. Dell'Orco's covers are all about overlapping shapes, negative space, clashing colours, extreme perspective and vertiginous angles. The cover to Air Ace #156 is a terrific example of his extremely angled aeroplanes criss – crossing each other – indeed, they are almost abstract cover designs, beautifully complemented in this case by the classic early 60’ lettering.
Source: David Roach in Today's Inspiration: http://todaysinspiration.blogspot.co.uk/2008/10/cover-art-of-british-war-comics-day-2.html
Pino Dell'Orco art
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Tony Dezuniga biography

Tony Dezuniga biography

Tony Dezuniga (8 November 1932 - 11 May 2012)[
With writer John Albano, Tony Dezuniga co-created DC Comics long-running and best-loved Western anti-hero Jonah Hex, and with Sheldon Mayer the first Black Orchid.

DeZuniga was the first Filipino comic book artist whose work was accepted by American publishers, paving the way for many other Filipino artists to break into the international comic book industry.
Tony Dezuniga art
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Frank Dickens biography

Frank Dickens biography

Frank Dickens
Frank Dickens began his famous and long-running Bristow strip in the Aberdeen Press and Journal in 1961 and has since produced more than 12,000 strips, the majority published in the London Evening Standard between 1962 and 2001. Bristow is the longest-running daily cartoon strip by a single author and has been in continuous publication since its inception.

It's principal character, the eponymous Bristow, is a buying clerk (18th in line for Chief Buyer) in the Chester-Perry Organization and his adventures involve everything to do with the drudgery of commuting, bureaucracy and large office life.
Frank Dickens art
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Ian Dickson biography

Ian Dickson biography

Ian Dickson (1905 - 1987; New Zealand and UK)
Ian Oscar Dickson was born in Dunedin, New Zealand, on 15 January 1905. He grew up in Melbourne and was self-tought as an artist. Dickson was something of a world traveller, seeking out work as a cartoonist and illustrator wherever he was. His work appeared in the Adelaide Register News Pictorial, the Brisbane Telegraph and tourist brochures for the Queensland government.

Emigrating to England, he produced illustrations for film companies and work for Razzle before moving to Ceylon, working for the Times of Ceylon and Ceylon Observer. Returning to Britain in 1935, his work appeared in Punch, London Opinion, Men Only and Blighty, often drawing glamour girls. During the War he served with the R.A.F.

For 15 years he drew Mum each week for the Sunday Graphic and his comic strips also appeared in Eagle Annual, Girl Annual and Swift Annual. He died on 21 July 1987. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Roberto Diso biography

Roberto Diso biography

Roberto Diso (born 16 April 1932; Rome, Italy)
Roberto Diso was born in Rome. He worked for Il Vittorioso since 1954, where he made a couple of comics in cooperation with Santo D'Amico. Later on, he was affiliated with the Giolitti studios, where he produced mainly war stories for the British Fleetway agency, such as 'Zip Nolan' in Lion Comic.

He was also the artist for the first 'Tiger' story. For the French market, he provided artwork to 'Lancelot' and 'Dan Panther' for Éditions Aventures et Voyages, again in cooperation with D'Amico. He also drew adult strips (1965), episodes of 'Goldrake' and mystery strips for the German market.

He joined Bonelli publishers in 1974, where he became one of the artists of 'Mister No'. Diso became the main illustrator and cover artist of the series from issue 116. In 1985, he created 'Rodo', the first strip he created on his own, in the magazine Giungla. In 1989, he illustrated 'Rudy X' with scripts by Rinaldo Triani in the review Comic Art, for which he also created several independent stories.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
Roberto Diso art
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Maurice Dodd biography

Maurice Dodd biography

Maurice Dodd
The Perishers strip was the brainchild of the then Daily Mirror cartoon editor, Bill Herbert. Scripted by Ben Witham and drawn by Dennis Collins, it first appeared in the Manchester edition of the Mirror in February 1958.

Alas, the strip did not thrive and Bill enlisted the aid of advertising artist/writer Maurice Dodd. Maurice didn't work in the usual way of producing a written script from which the artist worked, but worked out his own ideas in rough pencilled layouts with action and dialogue in situ, while Dennis continued to execute finished drawings for the script. Ben Witham moved on to write gags for the popular single frame cartoon Useless Eustace.

The Collins - Dodd combination was successful and the Perishers moved into the national editions in October 1959. The partnership lasted until Dennis retired in 1983. Maurice then took on the complete execution of the strip, from idea to finished artwork, until 1992, when he once again went into partnership, this time with Bill Mevin who now executes the finished work.
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Peter Doherty biography

Peter Doherty biography

Peter Doherty
Peter Doherty notes on his intriguingly named Not a Proper Person blog that he is not to be confused with the famous singer bloke. "I'm the much less well known comic book illustrator." Within the comic book industry, however, he is well known—as a regular artist for 2000AD's Judge Dredd and chronicler of the early life of Death in Judge Dredd Megazine, or as an artist who has tackled Grendel, Superman, Batman and Catwoman, or as a colourist for Geof Darrow's surreal Shaolin Cowboy.

At a time when Britain's comics were beginning a love affair with fully painted art in the wake of Simon Bisley's 'Slaine: The Horned God', Doherty preferred treating colour as an enhancement to his line art. "The few bits I actually painted were a bit of a disaster," he would later say. "Mostly I coloured my line drawings—I'd ink on watercolour paper with waterproof ink then use transparent media like coloured inks, watercolours and thinned acrylics so the line showed through, and finally finish off with solid colour over the top."

Doherty was taking an applied physics degree at university when he decided that his career should take a different direction. He met Duncan Fegrado, then working on 'The New Statesman' for Crisis with writer John Smith. Smith's friend Chris Standley was also trying to get into comics and he and Doherty collaborated on a five-page story "about an unemployed bloke, something we knew a lot about back then."

After meeting Steve MacManus at a Glasgow comics' convention, the story was sold to Crisis (Felicity, Crisis 47, 1990), with Doherty also providing that issue's cover. He was immediately offered Young Death, the origin story of the popular character from the 'Judge Dredd' strip, written (under the pen-name Brian Skuter) by Dredd co-creator John Wagner for the debut issues of a new 2000AD spin-off, the Judge Dredd Megazine. Doherty's first professional assignment couldn't have had a higher profile.

It's dark humour proved a hit with readers and Doherty soon became a regular on the Dredd strip in 2000AD, drawing episodes of the epic 'Judgement Day' storyline and a memorable one-shot, Bury My Knee at Wounded Heart, often cited as being one of the best Dredd stories ever. He also drew Mechanismo Returns for the Judge Dredd Megazine (1993) and a one-off tale of Armitage (1994).

Doherty soon found himself working for the US market, drawing the 6-issue Grendel Tales: The Devil May Care (1995-96) and Carson of Venus (Dark Horse Presents, 1998) and pencilling a 3-part series for Vertigo's The Dreaming written by Bryan Talbot ('Weird Romance', 1997). Further work on The Dreaming, Superman 80-Page Giant, Batman and Superman: World's Finest and Catwoman followed from DC Comics over the next few years.

In 2001 Doherty (then a relative newcomer to computers and computer colouring) found himself working full-time for a computer games company. Over the years he has also worked as an illustrator, storyboard artist and designer but has always returned to comics when the opportunity allows.

The 2005 2000AD strip Breathing Space (set in Luna 1, a moonbase in the Dredd universe) was begun by Doherty, but a lengthy illness meant the strip had to be reassigned after two issues; Doherty coloured the remaining seven episodes (pencilled and inked by Laurence Campbell & Lee Townsend).

Doherty has subsequently worked mostly as a colourist—on the 3-issue mini-series Seaguy (2004) and the 7-issue Geof Darrow series Shaolin Cowboy, which he also lettered and designed. The latter was nominated for five Eisner Awards in 2005.

His recent work has included colouring the Dredd episode 'The Convert' in 2000AD (2010) and a DCU Legacies back-up, 'Revelation!', drawn by Frank Quitely (2011). Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Peter Doherty art
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Gerry Dolan biography

Gerry Dolan biography

Gerry Dolan
With Doctor Who back on our TV screens, it seems apt to take a look at the work of a Doctor Who artist.

Gerry Dolan worked only briefly for Dr Who Magazine, providing illustrations for the short story The Infinity Season (#151, August 1989), written by Dan Abnett, and the strip Stairway to Heaven (#156, January 1990) scripted by John Freeman from a story by Paul Cornell and inked by Rex Ward.

Both featured Sylvester McCoy as the Doctor and were noted for Dolan's detailed rendition of the character. The strip's appearance in Doctor Who Magazine coincided with the final episode of the Sylvester McCoy era of the TV show (December 1989) and a gap of seven years before the TV movie and sixteen before the series was revived.

Dolan also contributed to The Worm, an exercise in record breaking that took place 1991 at London's Trocadero. From an outline by Alan Moore, 125 creators gathered to draw and letter a 250-foot long comic strip, recognised as the longest comic strip in the world.

Since those brief appearances, Dolan seems to have disappeared from the world of comics. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Selby Donnison biography

Selby Donnison biography

Selby William Donnison (19 August 1921 - February 1995; Tynemouth, UK)
Selby William Donnison was born on 19 August 1921 in Tynemouth, Northumberland. He drew for Super Detective Library (1953-56), Thriller Picture Library (1952-54), Cowboy Comics Library (1952-57), The Sun ("Billy the Kid", 1953).

In the 1960s he illustrated for The Bible Story, and drew for Lion, including "Tales of Tollgate School". He was still working in the 1980s, when he drew "The Four Marys" for Bunty. He also illustrated books on a variety of subjects. He died in Newport, Monmouthshire, in February 1995.
Source: UK Comics Wiki
Selby Donnison art
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David Dorman biography

David Dorman biography

David "Dave" Dorman (born 1958; Michigan, USA)
Dave Dorman is a science fiction, horror and fantasy illustrator best known for his Star Wars artwork.

Dorman's parents are Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Jack N. Dorman and Phyllis Dorman. Both parents are deceased. Dorman is married to award-winning TV/video producer, writer and publicist Denise (McDonald) Dorman of WriteBrain Media. He has a son, Jack, who was born in 2004.

Dorman's father Jack Dorman was renowned for his work and awards in the field of radio-controlled airplanes. Jack Dorman created historically accurate interiors for the planes and was an expert at model building. Dorman attributes his attention to detail to his father and credits both parents with giving him emotional and financial support early in his career. Together, Dorman and his father won numerous awards for their model building projects.

Dorman attended Saint Mary's Seminary and University in Maryland and The Kubert School in New Jersey. Dorman also taught a week-long seminar at the art department of Savannah College of Art and Design in the mid-1990s. The head of the art department at the time was Durwin Talon. Dorman has been asked to teach workshops at Flashpoint Academy and the American Academy of Art, both in Chicago, Illinois. He is also a co-founder of Comix Academy, along with Durwin Talon, Scott Hampton and Christopher Moeller and John van Fleet. This is a master class in comic book illustration.

Dorman attended a graphic arts program at St. Mary's College in Maryland, but left after a year because it did not have an illustration component. Next, he attended The Kubert School in New Jersey, but left after one year because their curriculum only taught black and white illustration and Dorman wanted to be a cover artist. As an illustrator, he describes himself as self-taught.

Dorman began his professional career in 1979, and has done illustration for comic book companies Marvel, DC, and Dark Horse, but his break came in 1983, when his artwork first appeared on the cover of Heavy Metal magazine. Hasbro commissioned Dorman to paint over 100 pieces realistic artwork for its 3-inch series of G.I. Joe action figures in the mid-1980s. In 1994, Dorman was commissioned to do the artwork for a series of 90 trading cards for the Ultraverse comic book setting. In 1996, Hasbro asked Dorman to create more artwork for its 12-inch G.I. Joe collector series.

Although he has produced art based on such characters as Indiana Jones, Batman, and Superman, he became most well known for his Star Wars artwork. The Star Wars Art of Dave Dorman was published in 1996 by Random House/FPG. Dorman won a poll of the readers of The Official Best of Star Wars Magazine in 1998, as "Best Star Wars Artist". Dorman won an Eisner Award in 1993 for his paintings in the book Aliens: Tribes. In 2010 he won the prestigious Inkpot Award at San Diego Comic-Con, where he was a featured guest that year. During that show, he also launched his new career retrospective book, ROLLING THUNDER: The Art of Dave Dorman, which is published by IDW Publishing and Desperado Publishing.

Dorman began his roleplaying game (RPG) work beginning with Pacesetter Ltd in 1985, and began freelancing for TSR in 1987, producing cover art for Dungeons & Dragons books as Gargoyle and the original Draconomicon, among others. Dorman also did artwork for the games Shadowrun (FASA), Torg (West End Games, or WEG), Champions (Hero Games), Mayfair Games' "Role Aids", Rifts (Palladium Books), and Blood of Heroes. Dorman also produced all the art for some of West End Games' Star Wars role-playing game supplements in the 1990s. He did some illustrations for the Micronauts toy line in the early 2000s.

Dorman has been known for more than 20 years because of his photo-realistic style of oil painting. Dorman's Star Wars: The Art of Dave Dorman cocktail table art book was the top-selling art book in 1996 for Ballantine Books and became the textbook of choice for illustration courses at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, Illinois. He was also voted "The #1 Star Wars Artist of All Time" by Star Wars Galaxy Magazine in 1996. Star Wars creator George Lucas is a fan of Dorman's work and has purchased dozens of Dorman's original oil paintings. Dorman held a license with Lucasfilm for many years to do limited edition prints.

Dorman's own proprietary work, Wasted Lands, written by science fiction author Del Stone Jr., is currently making the rounds in Hollywood for a film adaptation. This action/adventure film is heavily influenced by Dorman's appreciation of directors like Jean-Pierre Jeunet (Whom he met on the Alien Resurrection movie set), Akira Kurosawa and Leone, as well as writers Joe Lansdale, Stephen King and F. Paul Wilson. Dorman is in development with Hollywood actor Dan Roebuck (River's Edge, Lost, Desperate Housewives) for a fictional children's book authored by Roebuck. Dorman is also in development with Dave Elliott's Atomeka Press for a Wasted Lands publishing project.

Dorman has been featured in interviews for the Dennis Miller Radio Show, Mancow's Morning Madhouse, Sci Fi Channel, Turner Network Television's Southern Living Presents magazine program, and WEAR-TV in Pensacola, an ABC affiliate. Dorman is an avid supporter of Tom Roush's Pensacola Film Festival and the Baytowne Film Festival and he creates the artwork for their annual event posters.

Dorman can be found annually at his Comic-Con booth in San Diego with his contemporaries, Scott Hampton, Christopher Moeller, and John Van Fleet. In 2010, Dorman was a "special guest" at San Diego Comic-Con International. Dorman exhibited for the very first C2E2 in Chicago in April 2010. Dorman also regularly attends the Wizard World Chicago, HeroesCon, and Detroit's Motor City Comic Con, and is often the featured guest artist at numerous Magic: The Gathering tournaments. Dorman's own company, Rolling Thunder, publishes art books and limited edition litho prints.

In 2010, IDW Publishing, now partnered with Desperado Publishing, is putting out the new book "Rolling Thunder: The Art of Dave Dorman." A special edition issue will launch at San Diego Comic-Con International, where Dorman is a "special guest." Dorman estimates this book shows about half of his artwork, many of it personal work and pieces never before seen by the general public. In the book, Dorman speaks candidly and personally for the very first time about his mid-life crisis and how he survived it. In 2009, Dorman was a judge for the SPECTRUM Annual, the fantasy world's bible for illustrators. In 2009, Dorman also made history by creating entirely digital art, for his very first time, during Reverie '09, sponsored by MassiveBlack.com and ConceptArt.org.

Also in 2010, Dorman launched the podcast "Wednesday is Comic Book Day" with his wife, Denise Dorman – a mash-up of comic book industry insider news, pop culture news and interviews. The podcast is a free download on iTunes and is available via Farpoint Media, the producers of the show.

Dorman has been the guest of honor at Comic-Con in San Diego three times. It was there that he earned the Eisner Award in 1993 for his art work on Alien: Tribes.

He has been a longtime resident of Shalimar, Florida and of Mill Creek, Illinois. He moved to Geneva, Illinois in 2005. In 2006, Dorman offered to create an original 3' x 6' oil painting worth US$50,000 for anyone that would buy his home in Shalimar Pointe, Florida. As of mid-2011, Dorman had attended Comic-Con twenty-seven years in a row.
Source: Wikipedia
David Dorman art
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Cecil Doughty biography

Cecil Doughty biography

Cecil Langley Doughty (7 November 1913 - 26 October 1985; UK)
C L Doughty was one of the most prolific and successful historical illustrators to work on Look and Learn and other weekly educational papers. He produced several thousand illustrations between 1961 and 1982, his output astonishing in both quantity and quality.

Doughty was born in Withernsea, Yorkshire, on 7 November 1913 and trained at Battersea Polytechnic. His earliest comic strip was a two-page Buffalo Bill adventure which appeared in Knockout in July 1948. Doughty produced strips for Phillip Marx’s Star Flash Comic and Challenger Comic in 1948, followed by the cover and interior art for an adaptation of 'Oliver Twist' for the first issue of A Classic in Pictures (1949). 'Lorna Doone' followed soon after (in issue 8) before Doughty returned to the Amalgamated Press, drawing ‘Terry Brent’, a spot-the-clue detective series for School Friend.

Doughty found his metier when he began drawing for Thriller Comics, the 64-page pocket library edited by Leonard Matthews. His first tale was an adaptation of W. Harrison Ainsworth’s Windsor Castle (1953) followed by a variety of stories featuring Robin Hood and Dick Turpin.

Critic David Ashford, a long-time fan of Doughty’s work, has said, “Turpin’s comrades were beautifully realised by Doughty. Based, as they are, on R. H. Brock’s drawings for the Newnes pocket book series of the 1930s, all the varied personalities came to life – among them, the elegant “gentleman highwayman” Tom King, the swaggering Irishman, Pat O’Flynn and, perhaps best of all, the humorous character Jem Peters, he of the mutton chop whiskers. All are portrayed with obvious affection and enormous gusto. Strongly influenced not only by the Brock brothers but by other 19th century artists of 18th century subjects such as Hugh Thomson, Doughty’s style is, I think, best expressed in the one word, “debonair”. There is a certain way in which his leading characters stand, move and tilt their head which is peculiar to Doughty. It is a style which is ideal for these historical entertainments and strongly reminiscent at times of Douglas Fairbanks at his swashbuckling best.”

Doughty’s ability to paint had not been recognised in the 1950s, his only full page painting appearing on the rear cover of an issue of Comet in 1958. He worked briefly for Express Weekly (1957-58) and for eight months took over the artwork for ‘Jack O’Lantern’, a historical adventure strip in Eagle (1959-60).

In 1962, Doughty began producing illustrations in colour and black & white for Look and Learn. Doughty occasionally wrote his own scripts for the series on ‘Famous Houses’ that appeared on the centre pages of in early issues.

When Look and Learn closed in April 1982, Doughty decided to retire from commercial artwork and concentrate on landscapes. Already in his late sixties, he held an exhibition of his ‘straight’ work in Carmarthen, where he was then living. He also took on commissions and produced some magnificent paintings for fans.

In 1985, Doughty moved to a dilapidated cottage with a splendid studio, but died shortly after, on 26 October 1985, aged 71. An extensive biography and gallery of Doughty's Look and Learn work appeared in 2012 entitled Pages From History. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Cecil Doughty art

See illustrators issue 2 for a Cecil Doughty feature article.
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Lela Dowling biography

Lela Dowling biography

Lela Dowling Cirocco; California, USA
Lela Dowling is the comic artist of comics like 'Weasel Patrol'. She has made many prints and paintings in the fantasy genre. She also adapted the novel 'Dragonflight' for comics and contributed her version of 'Alice in Wonderland' and 'The Owl and the Pussycat' to the collection 'The Dreamery'. In the early 1990s, she worked as a game developer for Moby Games.

Lela Dowling Cirocco was born in Southern California and raised by parents who loved the outdoors, books, humor and poetry, all of which is reflected in her distinctive artwork. She has over 30 years of experience, creating a distinguished and award-winning body of work.

Her detailed pen and ink, pencil and watercolor illustrations still reveal traces of an early influence by the English Illustrator Arthur Rackham, while her whimsical cartoons were inspired by popular comic strips such as Walt Kelly's 'Pogo'.

Lela's work has been published in a wide variety of forms. In addition to limited-edition art prints, portfolios, illustrated books, comics and even doing a weekly newspaper strip, she has also worked commercially for companies such as LucasFilm, Yahoo!, Mattel, Electronic Arts, Hasbro and Leapfrog. Her many contributions include computer character animation, toy and character design, storyboarding and concept illustration.

Beginning a new chapter in her artistic career, Lela is a co-founder of the Skyland Gallery along with husband Frank Cirocco. She is delighted to further investigate her love of nature in this latest venture and looks forward to exploring exciting new directions in her art.
Source: Skyland Gallery & Lambiek Comiclopedia
Lela Dowling art
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Serge Drigin biography

Serge Drigin biography

Serge Drigin (1894 - 1977, Russia and UK)
Serge Drigin, sometimes spelled Sergie, Sergey or Serge R. Drigin, was a Russian artist, born on 8 October 1894, who, without formal training, became a successful illustrator in the UK in the 1920s. Formerly a sailor, he illustrated at least one book in his native Russia, Skazka o rybakie i rybkie by E. Venskii, in 1919 before beginning a prolific output for British magazines such as The Detective Magazine, Modern Boy and Chums.

He produced many startling covers for various titles published by George Newnes in the 1930s, including Scoops, Air Stories, War Stories, Fantasy and others. In around 1941, he was working for War Artists & Illustrators, based in central London, who supplied material to War Illustrated and Sphere amongst others.

In around 1934-35, he briefly turned to comics and drew varioius episodes for Film Picture Stories and the serial The Flying Fish in Sparkler. He returned after the war, when paper shortages meant that illustrators were finding work thin on the ground. He produced numerous one-off strips in 1947-48, mostly for Scion Ltd. In 1948, Drigin began drawing strips for Manchester-based J. B. Allen, producing a number of series for Allen's Comet, Sun and Merry-Go-Round comics until 1949.

In the 1950s, he was still very active, contributing features and artwork to various annuals, including Swift and Eagle, but seems to have grown inactive around the mid-1950s.

Drigin was married three times, firstly to Ruth Evelene Baker at Totnes, Devon, in 1923, with whom he had a daughter Shirley N., born 1927 (who later became a veterinary assistant in South Africa). The Drigins separated soon after and Ruth Drigin remarried in 1929. Serge Drigin was subsequently married at Lambeth in 1931 to Eva Walker (1905-1993) and, at Fulham in 1954, to Joan Octavia A. Nicholle (1916-1992).

Drigin, who was naturalised in 1932, died in Lambeth, his death registered in 2Q 1977 under the name Sergie Drigin. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Philippe Druillet biography

Philippe Druillet biography

Philippe Druillet (born 28 June 28 1944; Toulouse, France)
Philippe Druillet is a French comics artist and creator, and an innovator in visual design.

Druillet was born in Toulouse, Haute-Garonne, France but spent his youth in Spain, returning to France in 1952 after the death of his father. A science fiction and comics fan, Philippe worked as a photographer after graduating from high school, drawing only for his own pleasure.

His first book appeared in 1966, entitled Le Mystère des abîmes (The Mystery of the Abyss). It introduced his recurring hero Lone Sloane and played on science-fiction themes partially inspired by his favourite writers, H. P. Lovecraft and A.E. van Vogt. Later Druillet created book covers for republications of Lovecraft's work, as well as numerous movie posters.

After becoming a regular contributor to the Franco-Belgian comics magazine Pilote in 1970, Druillet's Lone Sloane saga grew steadily more flamboyant, as he pursued innovations including bold page designs and computer-generated images. His backdrops of gigantic structures inspired by Art Nouveau, Indian temples and Gothic cathedrals earned him the nickname of "space architect". Six tales about Sloane's exploits were collected in Les six voyages de Lone Sloane in 1972, hailed by many as his masterpiece, and Sloane was again the hero of the graphic novel Délirius (1973), written by Jacques Lob. In 1973, Druillet also produced the Moorcock's Elric-inspired Yragaël for Pilote, and Vuzz for the magazine Phénix

In 1975 Druillet joined Jean-Pierre Dionnet, Bernard Farkas and Moebius to form the publishing house Les Humanoïdes Associés, and the magazine Métal Hurlant. This was to be a vehicle for his finest stories, and showcased a steady evolution in his graphical skills. His series Lone Sloane and Vuzz continued, and other stories of this period include La Nuit, and Nosferatu. In 1980 Druillet produced Salammbô, a comic-book trilogy based upon Flaubert's proto-heroic fantasy novel Salammbô.

Outside his work as a cartoonist and illustrator, Druillet has also been active in architecture, rock opera, painting, sculpture and digital art. He worked as a designer on the film, Sorcerer directed by William Friedkin in 1976. He collaborated on Rolf Liebermann's Wagner Space Opera in the Opera de Paris in the late 70s to early 80s, and founded the Space Art Création in 1984. More recently he made Les Rois Maudits 2005 remake's artwork and designed large parts of the background.
Source: Wikipedia
Philippe Druillet art
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Edmund Drury biography

Edmund Drury biography

Edmund Drury (active 1952-1965)
Little is known of this excellent artist - we are not even certain whether his name is Edward or Edmond as it appears he was known to all simply as "Ted". It is believed that he was born in South Africa and was discovered by Ted Holmes who used him for the pirate strip, Guy Gallant for the cover of Comet. Drury also drew for the Hulton Press, producing another 18th century strip for Girl, as well as a strip for the first Eagle Annual.

His illustrations for the text serialisations of Edgar Rice Burroughs' early Tarzan stories in Comet show just how versatile this stylish artist could be. According to Leonard Matthews, Drury was "handsome to a degree" but "of a very objectionable nature" and extremely arrogant. Drury left British comics in the mid 1960s and returned to South Africa. Biography courtesy of David Ashford and Norman Wright
Edmund Drury art
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Les Edwards biography

Les Edwards biography

Les Edwards (born 1949; UK)
Les Edwards is a British illustrator known for his work in the horror, science fiction and fantasy genres, and has provided numerous illustrations for book jackets, posters, magazines, record covers and games during his career. In addition to working under his actual name, he also uses the pseudonym Edward Miller to paint in a different style and to overcome restrictions placed on him by his association with horror. He has won the British Fantasy Society award for Best Artist seven times, and was awarded the World Fantasy Award in 2008.

Edwards studied at Hornsey College of Art between 1968 and 1972, where he says he was "firmly advised that he would never be an illustrator" due to a general perception in the department that the job was too difficult, and later claiming that the experience failed to provide much of use in later years. After graduating, Edwards was taken on by the Young Artists agency in London, and began working as a freelance illustrator.

Over the course of his prolific career Edward's work has included advertising campaigns, graphic novels and film design, but he is perhaps best known for his book jacket illustrations spanning the horror, fantasy and science fiction genres. Over the years he has provided many illustrations for genre titles, including numerous pieces for Robert E. Howard's Conan stories and Pratchett's Discworld setting, and books by authors such as Anne McCaffrey.

Edwards is also known for his numerous covers for books in the Fighting Fantasy series, including Caverns of the Snow Witch, Demons of the Deep, and Crypt of the Sorcerer, and many of the more recent re-issues.

Many of Edward's paintings appeared as covers for Games Workshop's White Dwarf magazine during the 1980s, and he was featured, along with other illustrators from Young Artists, in an Illuminations exposé in White Dwarf. He also provided the covers for the Warhammer Fantasy Battle and Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay supplements Power Behind the Throne and Realm of Chaos: The Lost and the Damned, and a series of illustrations for the Dark Future game.

In 1989 Games Workshop published an anthology of Edward's work entitled Blood and Iron. He has also provided several pieces of work for Milton Bradley's HeroQuest, and covers for books for FASA's Shadowrun and Earthdawn RPGs. Edwards has also provided illustrations for British science fiction periodicals Interzone and Postscripts. as well as the now-defunct AD&D fantasy publication IMAGINE Magazine.

Edwards has illustrated two graphic novels, both adapted by Steve Niles from short stories in Clive Barker's Books of Blood. Having met at the World Fantasy Convention in London, Barker later recalled Edwards and recommended him to Eclipse Books for the first, Son of Celluloid; after its success Rawhead Rex followed. Edwards also created the UK publicity posters for the films The Thing, Graveyard Shift and Nightbreed, the latter a commission he received as a result of Clive Barker's influence.

Edwards has also provided a number of record covers during his career. A portion of one of his illustrations, originally created for The Devils of D-Day by Graham Masterton was also used as cover art for Metallica's early single, "Jump in the Fire", whilst his painting The Croglin Vampire appeared as the cover of the album "Alive and Screamin' by Swiss band Krokus. More recently he produced the cover for the album Music for the Jilted Generation by The Prodigy.

In recent years Edwards has also begun working under the pseudonym Edward Miller, a move designed to allow him to pursue a more diverse range of commissions without any assumptions on the part of publishers based on his prior work, particularly any restrictive association with the horror genre.

Edwards has won the British Fantasy Award for Best Artist seven times, and has been nominated three times for a World Fantasy Award which he finally won, as Edward Miller, in 2008, as well as having acted as a judge for the awards in 2003, and was the artist Guest of Honour at the 1995 World Science Fiction Convention.

Edwards is now represented by his wife, Val Edwards, with whom he lives in Brighton, England. When not painting, his pastimes include model kit building, playing the guitar and fencing.

Edwards often refers to his vintage horror work as his 'Red Period', a reference to the profusion of gore prevalent in horror illustration at the time, and to more recent work as his 'Blue Period'. Edwards is generally known for his emphasis on portrait elements, whilst as Miller, on the other hand, he places a greater emphasis on landscapes, and what he views as a more 'romantic style'.

Amongst Edwards' influences he cites the early influence of comic illustrator Frank Bellamy, particularly the Heros the Spartan strip, as well as Eagle's Dan Dare, and a later love for the work of illustrator Bruce Pennington, and describes a childhood attraction to anything 'strange or bizarre', drawing from a very early age, inspired by comics and film. His later exposure to macabre and violent elements in the work of more traditional artists, such as Goya's Saturn Devouring His Son, left an impression. Other major influences include William Blake, John Singer Sargent and John Everett Millais.

Although he has also occasionally used gouache, and more recently has often worked in acrylics, Edwards' original medium of choice is oil paint. This is used on any smooth board, ideally hardboard, which is primed with gesso. Following from preliminary sketches, images are constructed on the support with a hard pencil before being developed using washes of a neutral coloured acrylic, usually brown, a technique Edwards says he borrowed from 'the old masters'. The oils are mixed with an alkyd medium called liquin, which thins the paint and speeds drying time.

Edwards and Miller are also separated by distinctions of medium, with pieces under the Miller name more typically executed in acrylic paint on canvas panels as opposed to Edward's more usual use of oils on smooth board. Recently Edwards is enjoying the freedom found in the digital medium with programs like Painter, although he continues to express a preference for traditional painting techniques.
Source: Wikipedia
Les Edwards art

See illustrators issue 8 for a Les Edwards feature article.
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Will Eisner biography

Will Eisner biography

Will Eisner (1917 - 2005, USA)
The Spirit is his greatest creation and is still being reprinted regularly, despite being created in 1940. Reknowned for his cinematic style and unusual panel layout and angles, Eisner is highly respected by his peers. Born in 1917 in Brooklyn, he formed a partnership with Jerry Iger to produce comic strips for the voracious comic book publishers of the 1940s. His Hawks of the Sea was a tremendous pirate adventure strip. Lou Fine, Bob Powell, Jules Feiffer, Wally Wood, Jerry Grandenetti, plus many other respected artists have worked for and with Eisner throughout his career.

Over the past few years he has produced a series of innovative graphic novels beginning with the award winning A Contract with God. His book Comics and Sequential Art is one of the top selling books on how to draw comics and is continually being reprinted.
Will Eisner art

See also our WILL EISNER BOOKS & ART including The Spirit.
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Gerry Embleton biography

Gerry Embleton biography

Gerry Embleton (born 1941; London, UK)
Gerry Embleton is a British artist, born in London. He is the brother of Ron Embleton.

When 21-year-old artist Gerry Embleton began contributing centre-page illustrations to Look and Learn in 1962, he was already an 11-year veteran of the comic industry, his artistic career having begun at the age of nine inking pages for his older brother, Ron.

He worked with Ron regularly throughout the 1950s, inking 'Strongbow the Mohawk' for Zip and colouring 'Wulf the Briton' for Express Weekly. His first solo work, an illustration, was published in Mickey Mouse Weekly when he was 14 and he began working freelance at the age of 15. Some of his best early work appeared in Zip, where he took over the 'Strongbow the Mighty' strip in 1958, and Cowboy Picture Library where he drew Davy Crockett, Kit Carson and Kansas Kid (1959-62).

From 1961, he became better known for colour strips, producing fill-in episodes of 'Riders of the Range' for Eagle and taking over 'Colonel Pinto' for TV Express. Embleton contributed strips to Boys' World, Robin, Tiger and illustrations to Look and Learn in the 1960s, although his best-known work was 'Stingray' for TV Century 21 (1966-67).

In the 1970s, Embleton concentrated on illustrating books and became noted for the historical accuracy of his military illustrations, although he also illustrated fairy tales and histories of the American West. He briefly returned to comics to draw 'Dan Dare' for the revived Eagle in 1982. In 1988, he co-founded Tima Machine AG, a company based in Switzerland involved in creating life-size historical figures for museums and exhibitions. Embleton wrote and photographed The Medieval Soldier: 15th Century Campaign Life Recreated in Colour Photographs (1994).

In 1983, he moved to Switzerland. He lives in Prêles near Neuchâtel.

He is now best known as an illustrator of military and historic subjects. He has illustrated more than 40 titles for the military publisher Osprey. Gerry Embleton has been a leading illustrator and researcher of historical costume since the 1970s and he is an internationally respected authority on 15th and 18th century costumes in particular.

In 1998, he co-founded a company called Tima-Machine AG that works with museums all over the world, specializing in vivid life-size historical figures for museums and exhibitions.

Gerry Embleton is a founding member of the Company of Saynt George, a living-history association. His book "The Medieval Soldier", co-authored with Tolkien illustrator John Howe, had a big influence on the living-history hobby as a whole.
Source: Look and Learn and Wikipedia.
Gerry Embleton art
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Ron Embleton biography

Ron Embleton biography

Ron(ald Sydney) Embleton (1930-1988)
Born in London on 6 October 1930, Embleton began drawing as a young boy, submitting a cartoon to the News of the World at the age of 9 and, at 12, winning a national poster competition. At 17 he earned himself a place in a commercial studio but soon left to work freelance, drawing comic strips for many of the small publishers who sprang up shortly after the war.

He was soon drawing for the major publishers. His most fondly remembered strips include Strongbow the Mighty in Mickey Mouse Weekly, Wulf the Briton in Express Weekly, Wrath of the Gods in Boys’ World, Tales of the Trigan Empire and Johnny Frog in Eagle and Stingray in TV Century 21.

Embleton also provided the illustrations that appeared in the title credits for the Captain Scarlet TV series, and dozens of paintings for prints and newspaper strips. A meticulous artist, his illustrations appeared in Look and Learn for many years, amongst them the historical series Roger’s Rangers. Embleton died on 13 February 1988 at the age of 57.
Ron Embleton art

We also have BOOKS featuring Ron's work including Wulf the Briton, The Trigan Empire and issues of Look and Learn magazine.
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Dan Escott biography

Dan Escott biography

Dan Escott (1928 - 1987, England)
Dan Escott wrote and drew many features which played to his strength and interest in heraldic and medieval illustration. He was a regular contributor to the From Then Till Now feature in Look and Learn as well as creating back cover series on flags of the world, national symbols of Britain and the Guilds of London amongst many others.

Escott was born in Surrey on 3 December 1928. He studied at Croydon School of Art where he first came in contact with the subject of heraldry. Discovering that he had a flair for heraldic illustration (he won the school's Arms and Armour drawing competition two years running), he joined the College of Arms as a trainee herald painter, designing heraldry for stained glass, wood carvings, ceramics, engravings, banners, flags and coins, and developing a strong, bold style which stood him well when he began producing illustrations for advertising. One of his best known works was a painting of the Battle of Crecy which was published in the Illustrated London News.

In 1967 he was invited to work at the Institute of Heraldry in Virginia for the US forces, designing many regimental and other insignia, including badges for the Washington DC Police Department. Returning to England in 1968, he continued to work as a book and magazine illustrator. After the dissolution of his first marriage to Barbara Mitchell, he married Wendy Manfield (née Thornborough) in 1983 and emigrated to Australia where he worked for the Australian Geographic. Escott died of cancer in Sydney on 7 May 1987, aged 58.
Biography courtesy of Steve Holland.
Dan Escott art
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George Evans biography

George Evans biography

George R Evans (5 February 1920 - 22 June 2001; Pennsylvania, USA)
George Evans was an American cartoonist and illustrator who worked in both comic books and comic strips. His lifelong fascination with airplanes and the pioneers of early aviation was a constant theme in his art and stories.

Born in Harwood, Pennsylvania, Evans studied art from a correspondence course. He was still in his teens when he made his first sales, both illustrations and writing, to pulp magazines. Early in World War II, Evans was an aircraft mechanic at Shaw Field in South Carolina, where he sometimes flew in the planes he had worked on. He studied at the Scranton Art School and then entered the Army.

* Comic books *
In the post-World War II years, Evans began working for comic books, including an in-house staff position at Fiction House until 1949. Originally hired to rule panel borders, erase pencils and fill in blacks for other illustrators, he sat next the teenaged artist Frank Frazetta. Evans eventually got up the nerve to show his portfolio to the editor where the surprised staffer exclaimed, "What the hell are you doing this job for, when you can draw like this?" After that, Evans was given feature stories to draw in 1947. Among the features he illustrated were "The Lost World in Planet Comics and "Tigerman" in Rangers Comics. His favorite work from this period was for Fiction House's Wings Comics and he did a few illustrations for the company's pulp line as well. He picked up odd jobs while still attending art classes, including some farmed out to him by Better Publications' art editor Graham Ingels, who would later join Evans at Fiction House and at EC Comics. Evans' titles for Fawcett included the When Worlds Collide film adaptation and the Captain Video television adaptation, plus horror stories for Strange Suspense Stories, This Magazine Is Haunted, and Worlds of Fear. He contributed to the company's westerns and romance titles as well. Until the end of his life, Evans believed his work for Fawcett was better than any other in his career. He liked the people there and assembled a team of inkers and assistants after becoming one of Fawcett's top illustrators in 1950.

His work for EC Comics in the early 1950s included powerful covers and crime stories for Crime SuspenStories and memorable World War I aviation covers and stories for Aces High. He was a semi-regular contributor to The Haunt of Fear, Tales From the Crypt, Vault of Horror, Frontline Combat, Two-Fisted Tales and Shock SuspenStories (the latter of which also had three covers by Evans). Evans' shocking cover for Crime Suspenstories #23 was held up at the Senate Hearings On Juvenile Delinquency in 1954, among many other comic book covers from a variety of publishers. He stayed with EC through their new direction and Picto-Fiction experiments, contributing to MD, Impact, Piracy, Terror Illustrated, Crime Illustrated and Shock Illustrated, among others.

After EC, he contributed to Gilberton's Classics Illustrated, Dell and Gold Key. His books for Classics Illustrated included Romeo and Juliet (No. 134, September 1956); Lord Jim (No. 136, January 1957); The Little Savage (No. 137, March 1957); In the Reign of Terror (No. 139, July 1957); The Crisis (No. 145, July 1958); The Buccaneer (No. 148, January 1959); The Three Musketeers (No. 1, revised, May 1959); The Hunchback of Notre Dame (No. 18, revised, with Reed Crandall, Fall 1960); Oliver Twist (No. 23, revised, with Reed Crandall, Fall 1961); Julius Caesar (No. 68, revised, with Reed Crandall, 1962); and In Freedom's Cause (No. 168, with Reed Crandall, 1962; published UK 1963; published US 1969).

*Comic strips *
For Boys' Life Evans drew Space Conquerors! for the August 1953-March 1958 issues. During the 1960s, he was an assistant and ghost artist for George Wunder on the comic strip Terry and the Pirates. He did occasional work in comic books during this period, most notably for Warren's Blazing Combat black and white magazine and Eerie, Gold Key's The Twilight Zone and Ripley's Believe It Or Not! During the 1970s, he contributed comics to the National Lampoon. He drew DC Comics' war comics and mystery tales, and for Marvel Comics he did mystery-horror stories plus work on 2 issues of Super-Villain Team-Up featuring Doctor Doom and Sub-Mariner. Al Williamson passed Secret Agent Corrigan on to Evans in 1980, and the strip ended with his 1996 retirement. For several years before that, the strip, as with all story strips, was becoming less popular. As the strips's circulation dwindled, the syndicate was about to cancel it in 1991. Originally, Evans had been glad, and had taken on other work. Then Evans was lured back, because it turned out that the strip's popularity in European markets justified keeping it going for 5 more years.

* Aviation art *
George Evans in 1953 at work on "Frank Luke!" for Frontline Combat #13 (July–August 1953).
Evans' first love was World War I aviation, and he did many paintings of World War I dogfights, including a calendar for The Cross and Cockade Society. He also did book jacket art. For David Manning White's Marlborough House, Evans created the cover illustration for The Black Swallow of Death: The Incredible Story of Eugene Jacques Bullard, The World's First Black Combat Aviator by P.J. Carisella, James W. Ryan and Edward W. Brooke (1972). This illustration is on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force near Dayton, Ohio.

* Books and later career *
He illustrated a children's book, The Story of Flight, for Random House. The last page, which shows a man flying with a rocket pack, shows the rear of the Evans family home with Evans working at his drawing board in an upstairs window. In 1975, the hardcover novel Far Lands, Other Days contained many Evans black-and-white illustrations and a painted cover. In the 1990s, Factoid Books (a DC offshoot) released its Big Book of... series in which Evans drew some of his last comics: one a biography of baseball great Ty Cobb, another the story of the first air mail flight; and in 1998, the life of Judge Roy Bean in The Big Book of the Weird, Wild West.

Along with many other former EC artists and similar talents. he contributed many illustrations to at least nine of the 18 volumes of Art Linkletter's Picture Encyclopedia for Boys and Girls. He was commissioned to do storyboards for the film Jaws 3-D.

Evans, who in 1982 was living in Levittown, New York, on Long Island, was living in Mount Joy, Pennsylvania, when he died at age 81. His final work was the Flash Gordon Sunday page of 21 January 2001.
Source: Wikipedia
George Evans art
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Frances Olive Esme Eve biography

Frances Olive Esme Eve biography

Frances Olive Esme Eve
Esme Eve was born in Sydenham, London and designed book jackets, fabrics and beautiful greeting cards for the Medici Society.
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F R Exell biography

F R Exell biography

F R Exell
Not much is known about this accomplished book illustrator who appeared most active in the 1960s and 1970s. Exell illustrated the paperback editions of 'Moonfleet' by J Mead Falkner (1963 edition) and 'The Quarantine Child' by Geraldine Symons (published 1966) and illustrated the 'History's Heroes' feature for Look and Learn magazine in the 1970s.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
F R Exell art
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Derek Eyles biography

Derek Eyles biography

Derek Charles Eyles (1902 - 1974)
Derek Eyles was born in North Finchley, London, and had an artist brother, Geoffrey, with an uncannily similar style, although, according to Leonard Matthews, of no use when it came to "our sort of thing", i.e adventure strip work. Derek Eyles was the Amalgamated Press' number one horse artist and all new artists were given his work to help them learn to "do horses properly". He worked for Knockout from number one, having previously been working on Wild West Weekly, producing some of that paper's superb full-colour cover paintings as well as many of the interior illustrations.

Eyles' first strip work was for Knockout in 1947: a Western serial, The Phantom Sheriff (a strip featuring the same character appeared in the Knockout Fun Book for 1949 and is one of his best pieces of work).

This was followed, in 1948, by his masterly Dick Turpin's Ride To York and then by a complete Western story, Buffalo Bill's Close Call, in January 1949. His Kit Carson strips for the early issues of Cowboy Comics Library rank with the very best examples of the genre and his wonderful Western plates graced many of the A.P. annuals throughout the 1950s, including Comet. As well as contributing to a myriad of comics and annuals, Derek Eyles was a prolific book illustrator working for many publishers, painting covers and illustrations for a wide range of subjects. Biography extract courtesy of David Ashford and Norman Wright.
Derek Eyles art

See illustrators issue 5 for a Derek Eyles feature article.
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Carlos Ezquerra biography

Carlos Ezquerra biography

Carlos Sanchez Ezquerra (born 12 November 1947; Zaragoza, Spain)

Carlos Ezquerra is a Spanish comics artist who works mainly in British comics and currently lives in Andorra. He is best known as the co-creator of Judge Dredd.

Ezquerra started his career based in Barcelona, drawing westerns and war stories for Spanish publishers. In 1973 he got work in the UK market through agent Barry Coker, drawing for girls' romance titles like Valentine and Mirabelle, as well as westerns for Pocket Western Library, and a variety of adventure strips for D. C. Thomson & Co.'s The Wizard. The UK was a popular market for Spanish artists as the exchange rate meant the work paid well, but Ezquerra moved to London to be near the work, settling in Croydon with his wife.

In 1974, on the strength of his uncredited work for The Wizard, Pat Mills and John Wagner headhunted him, through Coker, to work for the new IPC title Battle Picture Weekly. He drew "Rat Pack": inspired by the film The Dirty Dozen, the strip, written by Gerry Finley-Day, featured a gang of criminals recruited to carry out suicide missions. But his commitments elsewhere meant he couldn't draw it full time, and other artists were also used.

In 1976 Battle editor Dave Hunt convinced him to commit himself to the title, offering him the laid-back anti-hero "Major Eazy", written by Alan Hebden. Ezquerra drew nearly 100 episodes in the next two and a half years, basing the character's appearance on the actor James Coburn.

He was asked to visualise a new character, future lawman "Judge Dredd", for the science fiction weekly 2000 AD, prior to its launch in 1977. His elaborate designs displeased the strip's writer, John Wagner, but impressed editor Pat Mills, and his cityscapes persuaded Mills to set the strip further into the future than initially intended. But Wagner (temporarily) quit over ownership issues and Ezquerra followed him when the first published appearance of the character was drawn by another artist, Mike McMahon. He returned to Battle, where he once again teamed up with Alan Hebden to create "El Mestizo", a black gun-for-hire who played both sides against the middle during the American Civil War.

In 1978 he and Wagner created Strontium Dog, a sci-fi western about a bounty hunter in a future where mutants are an oppressed minority forced into doing such dirty work, for Starlord, a short-lived sister title to 2000 AD with higher production values. Starlord was later merged into 2000 AD, bringing "Strontium Dog" with it. Ezquerra was almost the only artist to draw the character, until 1988, when writer Alan Grant decided to kill him off in a storyline called "The Final Solution". Ezquerra disagreed with the decision, and refused to draw the story, which was instead illustrated by Simon Harrison and Colin MacNeil. In 2000 Wagner and Ezquerra revived "Strontium Dog" based on a treatment Wagner had written for an abortive TV pilot. Initially, stories were set before the character's death in a revised continuity, but 2010's "The Life and Death of Johnny Alpha" brought Johnny back from the dead.

Other 2000 AD strips he drew included Fiends of the Eastern Front (1980), a vampire story set in World War II, written by Gerry Finley-Day, and adaptations of Harry Harrison's Stainless Steel Rat novels. In 1982 he returned to "Judge Dredd" to draw "The Apocalypse War", a seven-month epic which he drew in its entirety. He has continued to draw the character semi-regularly, handling the whole of "Necropolis" in 1990, "Origins" in 2006-7, and many others.

Ezquerra has also collaborated numerous times with writer Garth Ennis on Bloody Mary, Adventures in the Rifle Brigade, War Stories, a Hitman annual with artist Steve Pugh, and two Preacher specials (The Good Old Boys and The Saint of Killers miniseries) for DC Comics, and Just a Pilgrim for Black Bull Entertainment. In 2009 his son Hector inked his pencil work for Strontium Dog: Blood Moon.

Ezquerra occasionally uses the nom de plume "L John Silver" for work such as "The Riddle of the Astral Assassin!" in 2000 AD issue 118. From biographical notes on WikiPedia.
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Stephen Fabian biography

Stephen Fabian biography

Stephen Emil Fabian, Sr (born 3 January 1930; Garfield, New Jersey, USA)
Stephen Fabian is an American artist who specializes in science fiction and fantasy illustration and cover art for books and magazines. Fabian also produced artwork for TSR's Dungeons & Dragons game from 1986 to 1995, particularly on the Ravenloft line. He was self-taught, two of his primary influences being Virgil Finlay and Hannes Bok. His work is usually signed Stephen Fabian or Stephen E. Fabian.

Fabian was a recipient of the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 2006. He has also been a two-time nominee for the Hugo Award for Best Fan Artist (1970 and 1971), and a seven-time nominee for the Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist (1975–1981). Collections of his work include Ladies & Legends (1993) and Stephen E. Fabian's Women & Wonders (1995).
Source: Wikipedia
Stephen Fabian art
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Bert Felstead biography

Bert Felstead biography

Herbert Felstead (Active 1940s - 1970s; UK)
Herbert Felstead was a British artist known for illustrating nursery comics in comics such as Playhour and Jack and Jill.

Prior to his work as a comic artist, during the mid 1940s he was a director at the Gaumont-British Picture Corporation. Using the signature Fel, he then became an illustrator for several titles published by Juvenile Productions Ltd. in the first half of the 1950s. He first appeared in the Jack & Jill comic book in 1956, taking over 'Teddy & Cuddly' from Hugh McNeill. One of his best known features in the long-running 'Leo the Friendly Lion', that began in Playhour in 1961. Another popular feature Felstead worked on was 'Fliptail the Otter' in Jack and Jill from 1967.

He also filled in on several other strips ('Wink & Blink, the Playful Puppies' and 'Pam's Supermaket' in Playhour, 'Moony from the Moon' and 'Pinky & Perky' in Harold Hare's Own Paper), and his work was reprinted in magazines like Bonnie and annuals up until the 1980s. In the mid-1970s he became the artist of 'Little Joe', a strip created by Ian Gammidge, in the Daily Mirror.
Source: Lambiek and Bear Alley
Bert Felstead art
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Dorothy Fitchew biography

Dorothy Fitchew biography

Dorothy Fitchew (flourished 1910 - 1922 (died))
Landscape and natural history painter and illustrator
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William Russell Flint biography

William Russell Flint biography

Sir William Russell Flint (4 April 1880 - 30 December 1969; Edinburgh, UK)
Sir William Russell Flint RA was a Scottish artist and illustrator who was known especially for his watercolour paintings of women. He also worked in oils, tempera, and printmaking.

Flint was born in Edinburgh on 4 April 1880 and was educated at Daniel Stewart's College and then Edinburgh Institution. From 1894 to 1900 Flint apprenticed as a lithographic draughtsman while taking classes at the Royal Institute of Art, Edinburgh. From 1900 to 1902 he worked as a medical illustrator in London while studying part-time at Heatherley's Art School. He furthered his art education by studying independently at the British Museum. He was an artist for The Illustrated London News from 1903 to 1907, and produced illustrations for editions of several books, including W. S. Gilbert's Savoy Operas (1909) and Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales (1912).

Flint was chosen by art instructor Percy V. Bradshaw as one of the artists to illustrate "The Art of the Illustrator", a celebrated collection of twenty portfolios demonstrating six stages of a single painting or drawing by twenty different artists and published in 1918.

Flint was elected president of Britain's Royal Society of Painters in Watercolours (now the Royal Watercolour Society) in 1936 to 1956, and knighted in 1947.

During visits to Spain, Flint was impressed by Spanish dancers, and he depicted them frequently throughout his career. He enjoyed considerable commercial success but little respect from art critics, who were disturbed by a perceived crassness in his eroticized treatment of the female figure.

Flint was active as an artist until his death in London on 30 December 1969.
Source: Wikipedia
William Russell Flint art
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Charles Folkard biography

Charles Folkard biography

Charles James Folkard (1878 - 1963; London, UK)
Charles Folkard was born in Lewisham, London, and attended St. John's Wood School of Art, as well as Goldsmith's College School of Art.

He is the creator and original artist of the famous newspaper strip 'Teddy Tail', who made his first appearance in The Daily Mail on 5 April 1915. Folkard drew several stories for the Mail, which were collected in books by A & C Black, Ltd.

Folkard was succeeded by his artist son, Harry Folkard. Charles Folkard then focused on book illustration. He has done illustrations for such books as 'Swiss Family Robinson', 'Grimm's Fairy Tales', 'The Arabian Knights' and 'Children's Shakespeare'.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia & The Illustration Art Gallery
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Ronald Forbes biography

Ronald Forbes biography

Ronald Forbes (1917 - 2013; Dundee, Scotland)
Born in 1917 in Dundee, he went to Stobswell School, leaving at 14 to join DC Thomson, where he worked as a junior in the art department.

On the outbreak of war in 1939 Mr Forbes joined the Fife and Forfar Yeomanry, serving for more than six years as a tank driver.

He saw action with the 11th Armoured Division in Normandy, Belgium, Holland and Germany in 1944-45, when he lost many friends and comrades.

For many years he contributed to the Fife and Forfar Yeomanry Association and painted the regimental crest and battle honours that were recently restored to the Cupar association.

After the war Mr Forbes went back to college to study art and during the 1950s and early 1960s was a freelance artist working mainly for Amalgamated Press in London on the Rover. Captain Condor was one of his more well-known creations.

On moving back to Dundee, he worked for DC Thomson comics such as Bunty, Judy and Jackie.

He retrained as a teacher, qualifying in 1967, and taught at Fairmuir School in Dundee until his retirement in 1982.

He returned to art and major DIY projects on three homes. From his final home in Moulin, near Pitlochry, he continued drawing and painting into his early nineties.

He exhibited his work in many local galleries and sold Highland landscapes, still life and working horse paintings.

Mr Forbes died peacefully in Perth Royal Infirmary, just a month after his wife Nancy. He is survived by his children Allison and Malcolm.
Source: http://www.thecourier.co.uk/news/obituaries/pitlochry-artist-and-war-veteran-ronald-forbes-dies-aged-96-1.71272
Ronald Forbes art
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Don Forrest biography

Don Forrest biography

Don Forrest (active 1950s & 1960s)
Donald A. Forrest is a wildlife artist noted for his illustration of birds. One of his most notable books is The Birdwatcher's Key which is an illustrated guide to 382 different species to be found in the British Isles and North-Western Europe.

Forrest's career may date back to at least as early as 1949 and the publication of a children's book entitled Binkie Beacon and His Friends. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Don Forrest art
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Robert Forrest biography

Robert Forrest biography

Robert Forrest (active 1951 - 1968; UK)
Robert Forrest came into the comic business quite late in life, after a career with the Inland Revenue. He had never drawn professionally but was taken on by Ted Holmes for Comet, drawing Kit Carson for the front page. With his action-packed, free style, Forrest was a natural, at home in all adventure genres but, when Leonard Matthews used him for The Lyons Mail, he found his true metier, as one of the finest of all the historical Thriller Comics Library artists. As well as working for the TCL, Forrest continued to draw Western strips for its companion title, Cowboy Comics Library. He contributed to its Kit Carson and Buck Jones issues early on and later, towards the end of the run, full-length adaptations of Western novels, which can stand among his best work.

Forrest even tried his hand at science fiction, with The Martian, a strip version of Edgar Rice Burroughs' Princess of Mars", for Comet. He drew a fine strip for Knockout in 1960 - The Mad Emperor - which vividly conveyed the opulence and decadence of the Russian court in the 18th century. As with his masterpiece, The Picture of Dorian Gray (TCL 148), even the architecture, massive, opulent and overpowering, seemed to evoke the atmosphere of horror and terror. He also drew a splendid version of R.L. Stevenson's famous story, Jekyll and Hyde, which was originally destined for the Thriller Comics Library but, the policy by then having swung against historical fiction if favour of War stories and Westerns, it was decided to use it as a serial strip in Top Spot late in 1959. Forrest was also one of the 'Karl the Viking' artists for Lion magazine.

Forrest's strip adaptations of Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Sign of Four for Look and Learn are recognised as the best Sherlock Holmes picture strips ever produced. For the same magazine, Forrest produced his only colour strip - a serialisation of the story of Richard III -, which shows what a master colourist he was. Incidentally, the last chapter was drawn and painted by Eric Parker, indicating perhaps an illness or even, perhaps, Forrest's sudden death. Certainly the present authors can find no further work by this artist after that date.
Source: David Ashford, Norman Wright, Illustration Art Gallery
Robert Forrest art
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Hal Foster biography

Hal Foster biography

Harold "Hal" Rudolf Foster (16 August 1892 – 25 July 25 1982; Nova Scotia, Canada)
Hal Foster, was a Canadian-American illustrator and writer best known as the creator of the comic strip Prince Valiant. His drawing style is noted for a high level of draftsmanship and attention to detail.

Born in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, Foster rode his bike to the United States in 1919. In 1928, he began one of the earliest adventure comic strips, an adaptation of Edgar Rice Burroughs's Tarzan. In 1937, he created his signature strip, the weekly Prince Valiant, a fantasy adventure set in medieval times. The strip featured Foster's dextrous, detailed artwork; Foster eschewed word balloons, preferring to have narration and dialogue in captions.

Foster was a staff artist for the Hudson's Bay Company in Winnipeg and rode his bike to Chicago in 1919 where he studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and soon found illustration assignments. The illustrator J. C. Leyendecker was an early influence on Foster.

Foster's Tarzan comic strip, adapted from Edgar Rice Burroughs's novels, began October 20, 1928. Foster returned to do the Tarzan Sunday strip beginning September 27, 1931, continuing until Burne Hogarth took over the Sunday Tarzan on May 9, 1937. He soon grew tired of working on an adaptation and began planning his own creation.

William Randolph Hearst, who had long wanted Foster to do a comic strip for his newspapers, was so impressed with Foster's pitch for Prince Valiant that he promised Foster a 50-50 split of the gross income on the strip, a very rare offer in those days. Prince Valiant premiered on February 13, 1937, continuing for decades. In 1944, Foster and his wife Helen moved from Topeka to Redding Ridge, Connecticut. In 1954, the couple was seen on television's This Is Your Life. In 1971, the Fosters retired to Spring Hill, Florida. In 1967, Woody Gelman revived some of Foster's earlier work for his Nostalgia Press.

In 1970, Foster was suffering from arthritis and began planning his retirement. He had several artists draw Sunday pages before choosing John Cullen Murphy as his collaborator and permanent replacement in 1971. Murphy drew the strip from Foster scripts and pencil sketches. Foster stopped illustrating (and signing) the Prince Valiant pages in 1975. For several years, he continued writing the strip and doing fairly detailed layouts for Murphy, eventually doing less and less of both the writing and art until prolonged anesthesia during an operation took his memory and he no longer remembered ever doing Prince Valiant.

Foster attended the Comic Art Convention in 1969, and the OrlandoCon in 1974 and 1975.

Foster was 73 when he was elected to membership in Great Britain's Royal Society of Arts, an honor given to very few Americans.

Foster died in Spring Hill in 1982.

Foster is a seminal figure in the history of comics, especially action-adventure strips. R.C. Harvey argues that Foster and Flash Gordon artist Alex Raymond "created the visual standard by which all such comic strips would henceforth be measured."

Foster's clear yet detailed panels, uncluttered by word balloons, were appreciated by contemporaries of his generation such as Lynd Ward, but perhaps his greatest impact was on the young artists who drove the Golden Age of Comics. Foster was a major influence on this generation, many of whom went on to become iconic and influential artists themselves. Joe Kubert called Foster, Raymond and Milton Caniff the “three saints” of comic art in the 1930s and 40s. Several sources have identified early work by Joe Simon, Jack Kirby and Bob Kane as swipes from Foster, and Kirby claimed that he "cannibalized" Foster's style, among others. Kirby also stated that the character design for Etrigan the Demon was an homage to Foster, taken from a Prince Valiant strip. Wally Wood was "obsessed" with Foster's work, and began copying his newspaper strips at the age of two. Frank Frazetta called Foster's work on Tarzan “perfection, a landmark in American twentieth-century art that will never be surpassed." Among the many other artists who have cited Foster as an important influence are Steve Ditko, Mark Schultz, William Stout, Bill Ward, and Al Williamson. Williamson, who met Foster on a few occasions, described him as "a very stern gentleman, very stern, no nonsense. You could never call him Hal or Harold, it's Mr. Foster. ... you don't see that kind of people anymore, the ones that really command your respect."

In his review of Prince Valiant for The Comics Journal, Matt Seneca wrote "as far as long-form serialized action comics go, the only equal to Foster American comics have produced is Kirby, and Kirby was never shy about proclaiming his debts to the master."

Foster was recognized for his work by the National Cartoonists Society with the Reuben Award in 1957, the Story Comic Strip Award in 1964, the Special Features Award in 1966 and 1967, all for Prince Valiant. He received the Elzie Segar Award in 1978 and the Gold Key Award (their Hall of Fame) in 1977. Foster was inducted into the Will Eisner Award Hall of Fame in 1996 and the Joe Shuster Canadian Comic Book Creators Hall of Fame for his contributions to comic books in 2005. The latter award was accepted on behalf of the family by writer-artist Dave Sim, a longtime admirer of Foster's work. Foster was inducted into the Society of Illustrators Hall of Fame in 2006.
Source: Wikipedia
Hal Foster art
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Henry Fox biography

Henry Fox biography

Henry Fox (?1911 - ?1980; UK)
Back in the 1960s, Henry Fox became associated with Badger Books to such an extent that his cover artwork has become almost as well known as the novels they were attached to. Any fan of the work of the Rev. Lionel Fanthorpe will know and revere work of Fox H. (as the artwork was often neatly signed). Fox's covers are part of the charm of the books not because they are works of genius but because, like the books, they are pulpy, rushed and formulaic yet hint at wanting to be so much more.

Fox began his association with Badger Books (John Spencer & Co.) in early 1957 when he produced a handful of covers for the company's War and Supernatural titles; the work dried up after a year and it wasn't until mid-1960 that he became their main artist, producing over 200 covers for Badger before the company ceased publishing novels in mid-1967.

As far as I can tell, Fox began producing covers as early as 1952 when he worked for Arrow Books. By 1956 he was also being employed by Ward Lock and Pan, although throughout this period had also produced covers for the cheaper end of the market: Modern Fiction, Comyns and Alexander Moring. He also produced romance covers for Mills & Boon.

During the early 1960s, Fox also worked for the Amalgamated Press, producing covers for the Sexton Blake Library, 1961-62, and various war libraries, 1960-63 (and irregularly thereafter). In the late 1960s, post-Badger, he changed tack completely and began illustrating magazine stories, notably the 'Brer Rabbit' stories in Once Upon a Time and illustration for Treasure and Look and Learn.

Apart from his book covers and illustrations, very little is known about Fox. In the Artwork from the Pan Archive auction catalogue (Bonhams, 1991), the writer claimed that Fox was the pseudonym of one Henry Hall. Not true... and the only explanation I can think of is that at some point Fox worked for agent Maurice Hall and Hall's name appeared on the back of some artwork handled by Bonhams.

After a lot of digging I have discovered that Fox was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Art who lived in North London for most (if not all) of his working life, at 158 Alexandra Road, N.W.8 [fl.1948-59] and 27 Springfield Gardens, Barnet, N.W.9 [fl.1962-75].

I've not been able to trace him beyond 1975 and would love to know what happened to him. Henry Fox was a capable artist when working for the better paid markets although, for better or worse, he'll probably be remembered longest for his trashier work for Badger Books. At least that connection means his work has spread to the internet and any web site dedicated to Badger -- see the Pel Torro web site, for instance -- is almost a shrine to Henry Fox. The Look and Learn web site has a number of Fox's later illustrations from Treasure.

UPDATE (12 November 2006)
Thanks to Claire Batley of the RSA, we have a little more info. on Fox. Fox was elected a fellow of the RSA on Friday 1 November 1940. The RSA Journal carried addresses for members from vol. 94 (1945-46) at which time Fox was already living at 158 Alexandra Road. His move to 27 Springfield Gardens was noted in vol. 111 (1962-63). In the list of fellows in vol. 119 (1970-71), Fox has become a life member of the RSA. And, finally, in vol. 125 (1978-79) it is noted that he has moved to 26 St Peter's Crescent, Bexhill-on-Sea, E. Sussex.

The next available members list is from 1981 and Fox's name has disappeared. So it would appear that Fox died some time between 1979-81.

Having narrowed down the field of search, I was able to check the death registers for that period and there are two Fox suspects who died in that period whose deaths are registered at Hastings & Rother (which seems to be the place where all deaths in East Sussex are registered): Henry Stanley Fox (b. 26 December 1899, d. 1979) and, to me the more likely candidate, Henry Fox (b. 2 June 1911, d. 1980). I say the latter is more likely simply because the phone records don't record a middle initial.
Source: Steve Holland (Bear Alley)
Henry Fox art
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William Francis Phillipps biography

William Francis Phillipps biography

William Francis Phillipps (Active 1950s - 1980s)
Remarkably little is known about this prolific and very accomplished British artist and illustrator. Famed for his paperback cover art, he painted the front covers for many Agatha Christie Pan Books paperbacks during the early 1960s and was an illustrator par excellence for several children's titles (across the ages) including Look and Learn, Treasure, Once Upon A Time and Teddy Bear.

He illustrated many other covers including a remarkable series of western paperback covers for New English Library in the 1970s by J T Edson as well as for the popular Edge and Adam Steele wild west series.

He also illustrated many books including 'The Mysterious World of Dinosaurs' and the magazine series 'Birds That Cannot Fly', both in 1980.

He was equally at home painting cosy children's nursery rhymes, gritty western covers, Bible stories, vivid natural history portraits (mostly fauna, including Dinosaurs), and many other subjects.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
William Francis Phillipps art
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Picchioni Franco biography

Picchioni Franco biography

Picchioni Franco (1942 - 2002)
Picchioni Franco (aka P. FrankO) was an Italian artist. After finishing art school Picchioni Franco attended the "Institute Don Orione" in Rome, where he studied the subject "movie posters". His early works, both painted covers and half-tone illustrations, were published by the magazine "Giallo Selezione" in the early 60's. At first he signed his works Picchioni or simply Franco, before he finds his trademark signature: P. Franco.

In 1965 he started working for "Edizioni COFEDIT", and from then on magazines of the Roman imprint have their characteristics in their modern and effective covers. Many of these covers are printed in spot colors - ie the shade of a spot color - such as a spot light is created by printing smaller dots halftone of the base color, like those of "Fantasm", "Gordon Shott", or "Dany Coler" and "Demoniak"; but others ones are painted like those of "Alika".

Franco had a very wide range as an artist, with good knowledge of the works of many Italian painters like Averardo Ciriello and American artists like Frank Frazetta.

In 1966 he began an intense collaboration with" Edizioni Ma.Ga". He made the covers of their novel series: "Gialli del Cerchio Rosso" and "F.B.I.'s Story", novels that are collect more for the beautiful girls pictured on the covers than for the narrative content. Franco also painted almost all of the covers of "Joe Sub" and "Lucy Melson". At the same time, he was active as cover artist and did very important artwork in the field of movie posters. He worked closely with the "Studio Paradiso", but had also direct contacts with film studios who commissioned a number of flyers and posters.

In 1968 he painted several covers for Edizioni Fratelli Spada, where he met one of his admirers, Romano Felmang. Later Felmang, by putting Franco in direct contact with publishers, often asked him to paint the cover for his comic in various comic books. Thus we can see the beautiful cover on comic books like "Zorro", "Il Santo", "Sylvie", "Loana", "Sgt Clem", "I Diavoli" and many others.

When the recession of comic books with painted covers and movie posters came, Franco began to paint posters for the circus, mainly tigers, lions and lion tamers.

Franco left us in the early 2000s due to an incurable disease.
Source: Mandrakewiki.org
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Stanley Arthur Franklin biography

Stanley Arthur Franklin biography

Stanley Arthur Franklin (30 October 1930 – 2 February 2004; London, UK)
Stanley Arthur Franklin was a British political cartoonist whose career on the Daily Mirror and The Sun newspapers covered almost forty years.

Stanley (Stan) Franklin, born at Bow in the East End of London, was the son of coppersmith Harry Franklin. He left school at 14, and later attended Hammersmith School of Arts and Crafts where he produced his first cartoon published in Fleet Street, and took classes in lithography at The Working Men's College, Camden. He admired work of the Daily Mirror's Philip Zec which inspired him to become a political cartoonist. However, he failed to gain employment at the Evening Standard, and joined an advertising agency.

First employed as cartoonist with the Daily Herald in 1954, he moved on to the Daily Mirror in 1959, succeeding 'Vicky' (Victor Weisz). He stayed at the Mirror until 1970, moved to The Sun in 1974, and worked with that paper until 1998. His work included many cartoons of leading politicians and aristocracy, including several prime ministers, and Prince Philip who collected Franklin's sketches of the Royal Familty.

As a free-lance cartoonist he produced work for the New Statesman and for illustrated books: Alf Garnett's Little Blue Book (1973), The Thoughts of Chairman Alf (1973), Alf Garnett Scripts (1973), and Dick Emery's In Character (1973). He was a founder member of the Cartoonists' Association, formed in 1966, and was a member of the Fleets Street's old Press Club and a guarantor of the London Press Club. Franklin died at Kingston-upon-Thames near London in 2004.
Source: From biographical notes on Wikipedia.
Stanley Arthur Franklin art
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Dave Franks biography

Dave Franks biography

Dave Franks
Italian English by birth, Dave Franks' imagination and ability to work fast from memory have long helped established him as key to major players including Disney, Madame Tussauds, Coca Cola, and EMI.

Dave began his career working alongside Comic art creator Frank Langford in the 1980s whose mantle he was later to adopt. " I was also good at helping agencies out of difficult situations where they'd spent all night talking about doing the work and found there was almost no time for the artist (me) to actually do it.. "The conversation would go, 'Oh Dave I know this is impossible but would you help us out..etc etc..no matter what I'd get it done and they just could not believe it.

A recent Waterstones campaign was another eleventh hour job. One client even accused him of producing work that was 'too good'... "Now I'm painting, and it's such a relief from the digital fiddling about we get sucked into which so often looks sterile. Painting is more immediate and I'm having a lot of fun with it".
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Frank Frazetta biography

Frank Frazetta biography

Frank Frazetta (9 Feb 1928, USA - 10 May 2010)
Probably the greatest name in fantasy/sword and sorcery art. Born in 1928 in Brooklyn, he studied fine art in New York and started work as an assistant to John Giunta. Influenced by Hal Foster his work for various comics publishers in the 1940s culminated in 1952 with the only comic completely drawn by Frazetta, Thun'da Tales 1.

Following a few short pieces for DC his cover work began for Famous Funnies #209 - #216 featuring Buck Rogers. During the 1950s he worked on the daily strip Johnny Comet with brief periods on Flash Gordon and Li'l Abner. In the 1960s he began his painted covers for Eerie and Creepy magazines, the Ace paperbacks for Tarzan and the Lancer Conan series of novels. Today his original paintings are sold at Sotheby's for tens of thousands of dollars.
Frank Frazetta art

See also our Frank Frazetta books including Icon.
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Frank Kelly Freas biography

Frank Kelly Freas biography

Frank Kelly Freas (27 August 1922 – 2 January 2005; New York, USA)
Frank Kelly Freas was an American science fiction and fantasy artist with a career spanning more than 50 years. He was known as the "Dean of Science Fiction Artists" and he was the second artist inducted by the Science Fiction Hall of Fame.

Born in Hornell, New York, Freas (pronounced like "freeze") was the son of two photographers, and was raised in Canada. He was educated at Lafayette High School in Buffalo, where he received training from long-time art teacher Elizabeth Weiffenbach. He entered the United States Army Air Forces right out of high school (Crystal Beach, Ontario, Canada). He flew as camera man for reconnaissance in the South Pacific and painted bomber noses during World War II. He then worked for Curtis-Wright for a brief period, then went to study at The Art Institute of Pittsburgh and began to work in advertising. He married Pauline (Polly) Bussard in 1952; they had two children, Jacqui and Jerry. Polly died of cancer in January 1987. In 1988 he married (and is survived by) Dr. Laura Brodian.

The fantasy magazine Weird Tales published the first cover art by Freas on its November 1950 issue: "The Piper" illustrating "The Third Shadow" by H. Russell Wakefield. His second was a year later in the same magazine, followed by several Planet Stories or Weird Tales covers and interior illustrations for three Gnome Press books in 1952. With his illustrating career underway, he continued to devise unique and imaginative concepts for other fantasy and science fiction magazines of that period. In a field where airbrushing is common practice, paintings by Freas are notable for his use of bold brush strokes, and a study of his work reveals his experimentation with a wide variety of tools and techniques.

Over the next five decades, he created covers for hundreds of books and magazines (and much more interior artwork), notably Astounding Science Fiction both before and after its title change to Analog—indeed, from 1953 to 2003. He started at Mad magazine in February 1957 and by July 1958 was the magazine's new cover artist; he painted most of its covers until October 1962 (featuring the iconic character, Alfred E. Neuman). He also created cover illustrations for DAW, Signet, Ballantine Books, Avon, all 58 Laser Books (which are now collectors' items), and over 90 covers for Ace books alone. He was editor and artist for the first ten Starblaze books. He illustrated the cover of Jean Shepherd, Ian Ballantine, and Theodore Sturgeon's literary hoax, I, Libertine (Ballantine Books, 1956). That same year he drew cartoon illustrations for Bernard Shir-Cliff's The Wild Reader.

Freas also painted insignia and posters for Skylab I; pinup girls on bombers while in the United States Army Air Forces; comic book covers; the covers of the GURPS worldbooks Lensman and Planet Krishna; and more than 500 saints' portraits for the Franciscans executed simultaneously with his portraits of Alfred E. Neuman for Mad. He was very active in gaming and medical illustration. His cover of Queen's album News of the World (1977) was a pastiche of his October 1953 cover illustration for Tom Godwin's "The Gulf Between" for Astounding Science Fiction.

Freas published several collections of his art, frequently gave presentations, and his work appeared in numerous exhibitions. He was among several of the inaugural recipients of the Hugo Award for Best Artist in 1955 and was recipient under different names of the next three conferred in 1956, 1958, and 1959. With six more Hugo awards to his name (1970 and 1972–76), he became the first person to receive ten Hugo awards (he was nominated 20 times). No other artist in science fiction has consistently matched his record.

Freas was twice a Guest of Honor at Worldcon, at Chicon IV in 1982 and at Torcon 3 in 2003, although a fall suffered shortly before the latter convention precluded him from attending.

He died in West Hills, California and is buried in Oakwood Memorial Park Cemetery in Chatsworth.
Source: Wikipedia
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Fred Fredericks biography

Fred Fredericks biography

Fred Fredericks (born 1929; USA)
Fred Fredericks is an American cartoonist, who has drawn the Mandrake the Magician comic strip for over 40 years, taking over for the late Phil Davis.

Creator Lee Falk modernized the comic when Fredericks took over the strip, making it more reality-based by focusing less on science fiction and fantasy, and making Mandrake operate more like a secret agent, often helping out the police with cases they could not solve.

After creator Lee Falk died in 1999, Fredericks has also been responsible for writing the scripts for the Mandrake strip by himself.
Fred Fredericks art
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Barbara Freeman biography

Barbara Freeman biography

Barbara Constance Freeman (29 November 1906 - May 1999; Ealing, UK)
Barbara C Freemam illustrated many books by other writers, including The Treasure Hunters by Enid Blyton, and many collections of fairy tales, both traditional tales by Bros Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen and modern stories. Some of her earliest illustrations are found in The Cuckoo Book (1942), a book of fairy tales by Edith Mary Bell.

"Barbara C. Freeman is a gentle writer, with a particular appeal to girls. She makes no great demands of her readers, but does provide good entertainment. Anyone wanting easy, fluent, romantic stories would do well to consider her work." So wrote Felicity Trottman in Twentieth-Century Children's Writers.

Freeman was both a writer and artist, starting out primarily as an illustrator.

"I write, I suppose, chiefly because I enjoy writing," she later said. "I like living in two worlds: the one I was born into and the other (which becomes entirely real) which I write about. I'm deeply interested in the way ordinary people lived in the past and the way in which the past thrusts into the present. I believe that most writers find that their characters develop lives of their own and sometimes take charge of both conversations and plots. This, for me, is pure delight, and I allow my people all the freedom that is possible.

"At art school I was trained to observe details of every kind, and it is a habit that one never grows out of. Details, especially those of the past, fascinate me."

Barbara Constance Freeman was born in Ealing, Middlesex, on 29 November 1906, the daughter of writer and secondhand bookseller William Freeman and his wife Lucy Constance Freeman (nee Rimmington), who were married in 1905. She studied at the Tiffin Girls' School, Kingston-upon-Thames and at Kingston School of Art.

Freeman began working as a painter with Green & Abbott, a West End wallpaper studio (1926-27). From there she turned freelance, often working on annuals. She specialised as an artist of fairy tales, although in a realistic style with fantastic elements. She was often called upon to illustrate classic stories the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen. She also produced illustrations for The Children's Encyclopedia.

As television grew and the number of annuals and entertainments for children disappeared in the 1950s, Freeman turned to writing her own stories, beginning in 1956. He first books, Timi and Two-Thumb Thomas, were published in 1961.

Her work was exhibited at the Heritage Centre, Kingston-upon-Thames Museum, in 1989.

Since her early childhood, she lived in a mid-Victorian house with a large garden, from which she drew much of her inspiration. She died in May 1999. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Barbara C Freeman art
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Carlos Freixas biography

Carlos Freixas biography

Carlos Freixas Baleito (31 October 1923 - 26 February 2003; Spain)
Carlos Freixas Baleito studied at the Academy of Fine Arts. He had his first steps as an illustrator at the early age of 14, guided by his father Emilio Freixas. As his father's assistant, he saw his first work published in Lecciondes magazine, including the stories 'La Revancha' and 'La Muerte de mi Doble'. Together with his father, he began an assocation with the publishing house Molino. Their collaboration eventually resulted in the publishing project Mosquito, which they started with the aid of Angel Puigmiquel in 1944. Carlos Freixas created his first character at this time, 'Pistol Jim', whose adventures appeared in Gran Chicos and later Plaza El Coyote.

Molino asked him to join the Argentine division of this publishing house in 1947. He moved to Buenos Aires, where he did his frist Argentine comics for Patoruzito. He often collaborated with Alberto Ongaro, who wrote 'Drake el Aventurero' for him and with whom he illustrated Hector German Oesterheld's scripts for 'El Indio Suarez'. Freixas was also the author of 'Darío Malbrán Psicoanalista' for Aventuras magazine, a comic strongly inspired by the atmosphere of Buenos Aires of the time. For Patoruzito he created the boxing comic 'Tucho, de Canilla a Campeón'. He also did several detective ('Elmer King') and motor comics ('Juan Manuel Fangio'). Freixas additinoally returned to publishing in the 1950s.

Although a well-known and respected artist in the Argentine comics scene, homesickness made Freixas decide to leave the country in 1956. Back in Spain, he resumed his collaboration with his father and co-operated on most of Freixas senior's illustration work. He also took on agency work for the British market through Creaciones Editoriales. He appeared in several comic books published by IPC, such as Valentina, Marilyn and Bounty.

In Spain, he contributed to Juan Martí Pavón's magazine Chito in 1975, and he made a comics adaptation of Joseph Conrad's 'Gaspar Ruiz' as well as some horror stories for Bruguera. Freixas spent the final stages of his career working for US comics (including Marvel's Monsters Unleashed), Sweden ('Joe Dakota' stories for Semic's Colt title) and especially the Netherlands. He was a regular artist on series like 'Marleen' for Dutch girls' magazine Tina through Bardon Art.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
Carlos Freixas art
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Friz Freleng biography

Friz Freleng biography

Isadore "Friz" Freleng (1905 - 1995)
Freleng was an animator, cartoonist, director, and producer, best known for his work on the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons from Warner Bros.

He introduced and/or developed several of the studio's biggest stars, including Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Sylvester the cat, Yosemite Sam (to whom he was said to bear more than a passing resemblance) and Speedy Gonzales.

The senior director at Warners' Termite Terrace studio, Freleng directed more cartoons than any other director in the studio (a total of 266), and is also the most honored of the Warner directors, having won four Academy Awards.

After Warners shut down the animation studio in 1963, Freleng and business partner David DePatie founded DePatie-Freleng Enterprises, which produced cartoons (notably The Pink Panther Show), feature film title sequences, and Saturday morning cartoons through the early 1980s. The nickname "Friz" came from how "frizzly" his hair was at one time.
Friz Freleng art
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Keith Fretwell biography

Keith Fretwell biography

Keith Fretwell
The late Keith Fretwell was a very skilled aviation artist. He illustrated numerous books in Osprey’s Aircraft of the Aces series.
Source: Osprey Publishing
Keith Fretwell art
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Oliver Frey biography

Oliver Frey biography

Oliver Frey (born 1948)
Swiss-born artist resident in the UK for many years, Frey was a fan of Eagle and Look and Learn as a boy. He studied film at the London School of Film Technique and began drawing comic strips to support himself, working for Fleetway’s picture libraries.

After briefly running a film company in Switzerland, Frey returned to the UK and worked as a full-time comic strip artist and illustrator, working on two of his favourite boyhood comic strips, The Trigan Empire (1976-77) and Dan Dare (1982-83). With his brother, Franco, he was a co-founder of Newsfield Publications, providing hundreds of covers and illustrations for their many computer and horror magazines. He later co-founded Thalamus Publishing.
Oliver Frey art
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Leone Frollo biography

Leone Frollo biography

Leone Frollo (born 1931, Italy)
Born in Venice in 1931, Leone Frollo still lives in the Rialto area. Initially he studied as an architect, but failing to find success he was persuaded to become involved in comics.

In 1948 he had his first story published in an English magazine It was received so well by the publisher, Fleetway that they retained his service for many other projects where hoe continued to work until 1963.

Despite illustrating Westerns, Science Fiction, machines, horror, costumes etc, he became considered as the major exponent of erotic art and Frollo's women put on and take off their clothes in a wickedly exhibitionist manner.
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Fernando Fusco biography

Fernando Fusco biography

Fernando Fusco (1 August 1929 - 10 August 2015; Ventimiglia, Liguria, Italy)
Born in Ventimiglia, Fernando Fusco was a proplific artist for both the French and British markets, working in varying genres like romance and western. He made his debut in 1948 with the series 'Jeff Cooper' - his style strongly influenced by the great American writers of the time - that was published by Chiavari.

During his military service he worked for Il Vittorioso (The Victorious). Afterwards, in 1955, he moved to France and during this period he worked for publishers Editions Mondiales of Cino del Duca, Éditions Montsouris and the World Press agency. For the first he created the heroic series scientific Scott Darnal, for the second Cendrine and Esperanza and for the third he adapted a number of novels into comic strip format for some national newspapers such as Paris Jour.

For the Intermonde agency, he adapted Victor Hugo's 'L'Homme qui Rit' under the pseudonym Rifer, 'Salambo' based on the novel by Gustave Flaubert, as well as 'Cosmos An 2200' written by Claude Vaincourt and published in L'Union. In addition, at Sagéditions he drew the comic adaptation of the television series Bonanza and Tarzan.

From 1958, he was present in L'Intrépide with 'Commado du Silence' (script by Georges Sandier), 'Pirates du Ciel', 'La Flèche Brisée' and the heroic-science series 'Scott Darnal'. The latter was later continued in Mireille. Also for Mireille, he created 'Magali', one of his few humorous works. From 1960, he contributed to La Sage and produced series like 'Aigle Noir', 'Bonanza' and 'Willie West'. He was also present in Lisette with 'Cendrine' (script by Cendrine Rochemond) and 'Espéranza' (script by Montaubert). The fruitful collaboration with the French publishing house continued with Willie West, Plume de Falco or rewriting comics for other television series like 'Rin Tin Tin' and 'Le Cheval de Fer'.

In addition, he worked for the British market through the Temple Art Agency, focusing mainly on romance stories. In 1970, he returned to his native Italy and started series like 'Lone Wolf' and 'I Due dell'Apocalisse' (The Two Apocalypses) with Luigi Grecchi in Intrepido of the publishing house Universo.

From 1973, he was part of Bonelli's team of artists that worked on the 'Tex Willer' stories. Fusco worked exclusively on this character until 2010, when he decided to focus on painting.

With nearly 7,000 pages to his name, Fusco's version is one of the best-loved among 'Tex Willer' fans, with his style combination of very refined and simple at the same time, combined with gentle humor and his acknowledged expertise representing horses. Fernando Fusco passed away on 10 August 2015.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
Fernando Fusco art
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Horace Gaffron biography

Horace Gaffron biography

Horace C Gaffron; UK
A talented Scottish artist illustrator who was a veteran of the Somme where he lost his leg but lived to the age of 103. He illustrated many covers for Good Housekeeping mostly during the 1930s and 1940s (in the UK and USA). Proud of his Scottish ancestry, and nicknamed 'Jock', he was the last living Gordon Highlander.

His studio was in Scotland but he travelled to the USA quite often to meet his publisher (including Good Housekeeping), In Britain in the 1950s he drew for various children's annuals and in the 1960s he worked for Look And Learn magazine painting historical scenes and religious themes.

Gaffron often favoured an unusual magazine cover layout, with a large image on top and underneath it a much smaller, wider angle that further expands or underlines the main image. Sort of like a two panel comic strip and surely unique in cover design.
Source: The Illustration Art Gallery
Horace Gaffron art
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Felix J. Gardon biography

Felix J. Gardon biography

Felix J Gardon; Choisy le Roi, France
Not much is known about this accomplished French artist, who appears to have been most active during the late 19th and early 20th Centuries and focussed on still life and natural history themes.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
Felix J. Gardon art
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Giorgio De Gaspari biography

Giorgio De Gaspari biography

Giorgio De Gaspari (30 January 1927 - October 2012; Milan, Italy)
For such an incredibly talented artist, not much is known about Italian painter Giorgio De Gaspari. Although his merits are widely appreciated, hard facts about the artist are hard to come by. De Gaspari was born on 30 January 1927, possibly in Varese - or the province of Varese - north of Milan in north-western Italy, not far from the Swiss border. He began his career under the auspices of comic strip artist and illustrator Walter Molino who, in the 1940s, was a leading contributor to !!<Grand Hotel, to which paper De Gaspari also contributed; another strip ('Uragano, il re della prateria' [Hurricane, the King of the Prairie]) appeared in Success Collection published by CEA in 1946-47. De Gaspari also worked for Il Giornalino di Carroccio and illustrated il Giustiziere scarlatto for Albi Mignon.

In May 1947 his first illustrations appeared in La Domenica del Corriere, a Sunday paper which he was to continue contributing to until February 1970, producing over 1,000 illustrations. De Gaspari's paintings were of high quality and innovative in their use of original material, tools and techniques. He would use any sort of paper, create collages and cut and scratch the images. Such experimentation did occasionally cause him to fall foul of his editors. In one instance, on a Kit Carson cover painting for Cowboy Picture Library, he used real sand glued onto the page; although it made for a superb, textured image, it all had to be scraped off and a new sandy background painted in by an in-house 'bodger' rather than run the risk of damaging the machinery that turned the artwork into four-colour separations.

De Gaspari was a busy children's book illustrator in Italy for publishers Valladri, Agostoni, Lucchi and Fabbri as well as contributing illustrations to Arianna. Amongst the many titles he illustrated in the 1940s and 1950s were editions of Pinocchio, Don Quixote, The Three Musketeers, Moby Dick, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and various fairy tale books.

De Gaspari's first cover in the UK appeared on the Sexton Blake Library in February 1958, gracing Peter Saxon's The Sea Tigers; his second (and last) cover showed his talent for variety, illustrating Collapse of Stout Party by Jack Trevor Story.

De Gaspari thereafter turned his talents to providing covers for Fleetway's many pocket libraries, including Cowboy Picture Library (30 covers, 1958-60), Thriller Picture Library (39 covers, 1958-60) and Super Detective Library (4 covers, 1960).

However, it was with his work for War Picture Library that he is mainly known in the UK. Beginning with the very first issue in September 1958, De Gaspari produced 32 of the first 48 covers (1958-60) and were still appearing regularly until 1961, during which period (1960-61) he also contributed 12 covers to Air Ace Picture Library and the debut number of Battle Picture Library (1961). A brief resurgence in 1966 marked the end of De Gaspari's original appearances in the UK, although his work continued to appear, albeit infrequently, on book covers and in Reader's Digest Condensed Books.

He moved to London and lived there for many years, but eventually tiring of the rat-race, moved to the tiny Venetian island of Pellestrina, where, signing his work Giorgio Foresto, he would exchange his paintings for the necessities to support his Spartan existance. He died in Venice in October 2012.
Source: Steve Holland and Illustration Art Gallery
Giorgio De Gaspari art

See illustrators issue 15 for a Giorgio De Gaspari feature article.
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Martin Geraghty biography

Martin Geraghty biography

Martin Geraghty; UK
Martin Geraghty is a comic book artist who lives and works in the UK.

His first commission was for the Marvel UK comic Overkill but the comic folded before his story was published.

He began drawing for Doctor Who Magazine in 1993 and has continued to draw regularly for it ever since.

Outside of comics Martin works in advertising.
Martin Geraghty art
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Gary Gianni biography

Gary Gianni biography

Gary Gianni (born 1954; USA)
Gary Gianni is an American comics artist best known for his eight years illustrating the syndicated newspaper comic Prince Valiant.

After Gianni graduated from the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts in 1976, he worked for the Chicago Tribune as an illustrator and network television news as a courtroom sketch artist.

He also illustrated numerous magazines, children's books and paperbacks. He made his comic book debut in 1990 with illustrated adaptations of The Tales of O. Henry and 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea for the Classics Illustrated series. He went on to work for Dark Horse Comics he contributed to Indiana Jones and the Shrine of the Sea Devil and The Shadow.

He illustrated Wandering Star's Savage Tales of Solomon Kane (1998) and Bran Mak Morn: The Last King (2001) and The Complete Conan of Cimmeria Volume 2 (2004), all by Robert E. Howard.

After John Cullen Murphy retired from Prince Valiant in 2004, Gianni began drawing the strip, continuing until March 25, 2012, when Thomas Yeates became the strip's illustrator on April 1, 2012.

Gianni won the 1997 Best Short Story Eisner Award for his collaborating with Archie Goodwin on Heroes in DC Comics' Batman: Black & White.
Source: Wikipedia & The Book Palace
Gary Gianni art
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Ian Gibson biography

Ian Gibson biography

Ian Gibson; UK
Ian Gibson made his debut in the British comic fanzines Aspect and Orpheus. In 1973, he worked for House of Hammer and IPC Girl's Comic Group, and did promotional art for various record companies. He began a collaboration with Valiant editor John Wagner, for whom he drew 'Death Wish', some 'Judge Dredd' stories, 'Ace Trucking Co.' and 'Robo-Hunter'.

In the 1980s, he published in the British comics magazine 2000 A.D., where he used the pseudonyms of Emberton and Q. Twerk. With Alan Moore, he worked on 'The Ballad of Halo Jones', and with Alan Grant and John Wagner, he created 'The Chronicles of Genghis Grimtoad' (1990).

Gibson was also present on the US market with 'Mister Miracle' (DC Comics) and 'Meta 4' (First Comics). Since 2000, he is back at 2000AD, with new 'Judge Dredd' and 'Robo-Hunter' stories.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
Ian Gibson art
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Denis Gifford biography

Denis Gifford biography

Denis Gifford (26 December 1927 - 2000; London, UK)
Denis Gifford was born in Forest Hill, London, on Boxing Day 1927. He made his first comic, 'The Ragtime', when he was still a kid. By the time he was fifteen he was spending his homework time drawing adventures of 'Pansy Potter' in The Beano magazine. After a brief spell as junior cartoonist on Reynold's News, he was called into the RAF, where he spent his duty weekends drawing a super-hero comic-book, 'Streamline', for a Manchester publisher. After demob he set up a studio with another cartoonist chum, Bob Monkhouse, producing complete comics for the many small publishers that proliferated in the late 1940s.

Then he joined Knockout magazine, the top comic of the day, taking over the popular favorites 'Our Ernie' (created by Charles Holt) and 'Stonehenge Kit the Ancient Brit'. He also did a long spell on 'Marvelman' comics, and the daily satire strip 'Telestrip' in the London Evening News. Other comics he worked on were 'Simon the Simple Sleuth', 'William Wagtail' and 'Dicky Diddle'.

The only comic Denis Gifford created himself was 'Steadfast McStaunch', which ran from 1950 to 1952. For some reason, Denis Gifford was allowed to sign his work, when most of the other British and Scottish artists working for publisher DC Thompson remained anonymous to their readership.

Denis Gifford has written over 50 books, mostly on the subjects of comics and cinema, and can be regarded as one of British foremost comic experts. Ever since he was young, he collected comics, until his collection completely took over his house. He also created several programs for radio and television, the last one being the radio show 'A Hundred Laughs for a Ha'penny', about the history of comics, which he did in 1999 together with his old friend Bob Monkhouse. Denis Gifford died in May 2000.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
Denis Gifford art
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Terence Gilbert biography

Terence Gilbert biography

Terence Gilbert; UK)
Terence Gilbert is a chronicler of the contemporary scene. This he achieves with supreme success in his unique style combining realism with impressionism. He is present at events where action at every level of society is taking place: polo at Windsor, racing at Longchamp, rowing at Henley Royal Regatta, or ballet at the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden.
His assured draughtsmanship and exceptional observation enable Terence to capture an exact moment of action as well as the atmosphere of the setting where the event is happening.

Having studied at Camberwell Arts School in London, his knowledge of structure and anatomy enable him to portray the bodily tension of a sporting or theatrical moment: the stance of a fighter; the leap of a ballet dancer, a jockey's balance on a race horse and the dexterity of a jazz musician.

Terence's range of work is remarkably varied. He is extremely well-known and highly regarded for his equestrian portraits and his paintings on racing and sporting themes. Moreover, he has achieved international renown for his portraiture. His most significant commissions include a painting of HM The Queen and President Reagan riding at Windsor, which was presented to the President at the White House and a portrait of HM King Hussein of Jordan painted at Sandhurst. He has been commissioned by stars of film and stage, as well as painting many sporting heroes.

Terence has exhibited successfully worldwide and is in constant demand for new paintings.
Terence Gilbert art
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John Gillatt biography

John Gillatt biography

John Gillatt
John Gillatt is a British artist who mainly draws football comics. His most famous series is probably 'Billy's Boots'. The series is about the little boy Billy Dane, who got incredible football skills through his boots. The series was later continued by Mike Western.

John's credits in British comics span decades, including work on “Jet Ace Logan”, “Johnny Cougar”, “Dan Dare” (for New Eagle, which Barrie edited) and, perhaps most famously, the opening episodes of “Billy's Boots” for Scorcher. (A strip that went on to further success in Holland where Billy Dane was transplanted to the continent and, unlike his British incarnation, grew up to become a talented football star in his own right, as Lew Stringer recounted on Blimey! It's Another Blog About Comics back in 2010 – a version kick started with some deft new art by John).

Gillatt first drew 'Jet-Ace Logan' for Comet and later Tiger in the late 1950s. In 1989 he took on the daily 'Scorer' comic for The Mirror, along with writer Barrie Tomlinson and fellow artist David Pugh.
Source: Downthetubes.net & Lambiek Comiclopedia
John Gillatt art
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Alberto Giolitti biography

Alberto Giolitti biography

Alberto Giolitti (14 November 1923 - 15 April 1993; Rome, Italy)
Alberto Giolitti was an Italian-American comic book artist, born in Rome, where his family held (and still hold) one of the most famous café, Giolitti, where he also worked for a while.

He debuted as artist for Il Vittorioso in the late 1940s. After World War II, Giolitti moved to South America, where he worked for Editorial Lainez and Columba of Buenos Aires. After three years of stay in that country, he was able to move to his originary destination, the United States: here he became a mainstay of Western/Dell Publishing, for which he pencilled numerous characters, including Indian Chief, Tonto, Cisco Kid, Turok, Gunsmoke.

After having obtained the American citizenship, in 1960 he returned to Italy, although continuing to collaborate with Western and other US and British publishers. Series he worked on in this period include also Gold Key Comics' Star Trek. For the same company he drew a King Kong adaptation. In Rome he established a popular studio of comics artists, called Studio Giolitti after him.

In 1986 he realized a long science-fiction story, "Cinque anni dopo" ("Five Years Later"), and from the late 1980s he finished several stories of the main Italian comics western character, Tex Willer.

Alberto Giolitti died in Rome in 1993.
Source: Wikipedia
Alberto Giolitti art
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Ruggero Giovannini biography

Ruggero Giovannini biography

Ruggero Giovannini (1922 - 1983, Italy)
The word that most accurately describes the strip work of Giovannini is "rugged"; peculiarly apt for an artist whose Christian name is "Ruggero". His Western work for Thriller Picture Library, Cowboy Picture Library and for Top Spot is first class, his style eminently suitable for the hard-bitten subject matter. Paradoxically, however, perhaps his very best work was not a Western strip but a superb, action-packed version of The Three Musketeers (from a first class script by Leonard Matthews) for Look and Learn. Printed in full colour, this is one the most resplendent versions of Dumas' story ever to appear in comics, Giovannini's unusual "tough" style modified by a new swashbuckling grace.

Born in Rome, he began working as a strip artist in the pages of the celebrated comic journal, Vittorioso, in 1945. His first strip for the British comics was a wildlife adventure series based on the true-life exploits of Armand and Michaela Denis for Junior Express Weekly in 1955, followed by Red Devil Dean for the same paper. The following year, he was given the front page strip of the comic (now renamed Express Weekly), drawing Freedom is the Prize, set in Ancient Rome and introducing the character of Wulf the Briton, later to be made famous by Ron Embleton. His longest running strip for British comics was another story set in Ancient Rome: Olac the Gladiator for Tiger. He drew many more Historical strips for Ranger and for Look and Learn, including a fine version of Ben-Hur for the latter. It must be admitted, however, that, like so many European artists, Giovannini was not comfortable drawing English historical subjects as can be seen by his work for Dick Turpin and the Double Faced Foe (TCL no. 149) where the lack of authenticity is glaringly apparent. Biography courtesy of David Ashford and Norman Wright.
Ruggero Giovannini art
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Cecil Glossop biography

Cecil Glossop biography

Cecil Glossop (fl. 1921-1940; UK)
Popular and prolific illustrator for Chums (a weekly boys paper that ran from 1892 to 1941), The Scout, The Crusoe magazine, The Pioneer, and The Boys' Friend comics between 1922 and 1940.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
Cecil Glossop art

See illustrators issue 16 for a Cecil Glossop feature article.
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José (Pepe) Gonzalez biography

José (Pepe) Gonzalez biography

José (Pepe) González (1939 – 2009; Spain)
José "Pepe" González was a Spanish comic book artist.

José González started his career at the age of 17 working on Rosas Blancas and Brigitte for the company Editorial Toray. He joined the agency Selecciones Illustrada in 1960 and drew romance comics for Fleetway. González also worked as a pin-up artist during this time for the international market.

Due to his connections with S.I., González started working for Warren Publishing in 1971. Jim Warren described his reaction to seeing González's art in The Warren Companion:

The minute I took one look at Pepe González's artwork, I knew we had it! We survived 12 issues but there it was. This is what I wanted for the first issue but couldn't put together.

Starting with issue 12 in 1971, González became the primary artist for the character Vampirella. Comics historian David Roach discusses the reaction to González's art on Vampirella in The Warren Companion.

His first "Vampirella" strip appeared one year later in Vampirella #12 and caused an immediate sensation. Here was the same glamour and sophistication that had worked so well in Britain applied to a character of enormous potential but hitherto little direction. The cover of #19 featured González's memorable full figure painting of Vampirella, a bat balanced on her outstretched hand, which came to symbolize the character on everything from posters to books to stickers and pillows. It was an icon, as a pin-up for adolescents (of all ages) that his vision of her worked best since her strips, particularly in the early day, failed to live up to their potential.

González received immediate acclaim for his work on Vampirella, and his first story won the Warren Award for best art in a story in 1971. González drew the Vampirella story for every issue from issue 12 through issue 34. He won another Warren Award in 1974 for best art on a story for his work in issue 33.

By mid-1974, González's output for Vampirella reduced and multiple fill-in artists including Jose Ortiz and Leopold Sanchez contributed Vampirella stories. González would remain as the primary artist for Vampirella for the next few years, but by 1977 he shared duties with artist Gonzalo Mayo. Warren would also reprint the three part series "Herma", which had been originally drawn in 1974 in issues 8-10 of 1984.

After issue 82 of Vampirella in 1979, González ceased drawing for Warren, except for one page pin-up contributions (which had started appearing with issue 39 in 1975) which were printed on the Contents page. González would return to Warren in 1982 and would draw stories for Vampirella in the final 6 non-reprint issues of the title until Warren's bankruptcy. From 1971 through 1983, González drew 58 stories for Warren Publishing, putting him in the top 10 most prolific artists at the company. He drew 53 total strips of Vampirella, making him that title's most prolific artist
Source: Wikipedia
José (Pepe) Gonzalez art
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John S Goodall biography

John S Goodall biography

John Strickland Goodall (7 June 1908 - 2 June 1996; Norfolk, UK)
John S. Goodall RBA RI was a British author, watercolor painter and illustrator best known for his wordless picture adventures (one award-winning example being The Adventures of Paddy Pork), although his output has included more conventional pictures, and illustrations for a wide range of publications (including the Radio Times) and books by the "fictitious village schoolmistress Miss Read".

For many years John Strickland Goodall was one of Britain's favourite illustrators of children's books. Aimed at an adult audience his books 'An Edwardian Season' and' Victorians Abroad' were very popular and this helped Goodall become one of England's beloved artists due to the subject matter of his works - the Victorian and Edwardian periods.

John was born in Heacham in Norfolk on 7 June 1908 the son of Prof Joseph Strickland Goodall an eminent cardiologist, and his wife, Amelia Hunt. He came from a long line of doctors. He attended Harrow School. His father permitted him to leave academia and instead train as an artist under two family friends: Sir Arthur Stockdale Cope and John Watson Nicol. From 1925 to 1929 he attended the Royal Academy of Arts. He married Margaret Nicol in 1933.

During the Second World War he worked as a camouflage artist, based in India. He had his first public exhibition of paintings in the Government School of Art in Calcutta in 1943. After the war he settled in Tisbury where he shared an idyllic cottage with his wife. The house featured in many of his paintings.

He died in Shaftesbury on 2 June 1996.

A self-portrait created during the Second World War is held by the National Portrait Gallery, London.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery and Wikipedia
John S Goodall art
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Robert Gould biography

Robert Gould biography

Robert Gould (born ?1950s; USA)
For over 30 years, Imaginosis President Robert Gould has been involved with the development, creation, and production of art and story for all media. In 1974, Robert received a Bachelor's Degree of Fine Arts from Massachusetts College of Art, majoring in Art Education with a minor in Literature and Film. During his time at college, he and three other artists published "New Legends", the first commercially successful underground comic book published in Boston.

After receiving his degree, he continued the work in the comic book field, supplying work to Marvel Comics and numerous other comic publications. Seeking to explore the possibilities of combining picture and word in visual narrative, Robert and writer Eric Kimball formed the company, Two Man Horse. Together they created and published numerous works inspired by their love of Pre-Raphaelite art and philosophy. Two Man Horse was commissioned by StarReach Publications to create an original comic book story based on Michael Moorcock's widely popular Elric of Melnibone book series. "The Prisoner of Pan Tang" won numerous awards and firmly established Robert as the pre-eminent illustrator for Michael Moorcock's tragic hero.

In 1978, Robert began his career as a book cover designer and illustrator by designing the covers for the six book Elric of Melnibone saga, his sensitive watercolors and dramatic graphic design contrasting sharply with the style of fantasy illustration at the time and proved wildly popular. He continued to re-design Moorcock's entire fantasy publishing line of over 50 books, developing a distinct but interrelated style for each series. His work garnered him many awards, including the World Fantasy Award for Best Artist in 1991 and spawned a new style of fantasy illustration both in the US and Europe.

For over fifteen years, Robert continued his career as a book designer and illustrator for publishers in the US and Europe, completing well over 180 cover designs. He specialized in book series and exercised complete control over all design, illustration and typographic aspects of his projects. Robert created an individual, cohesive identity – a "theme" - for each series and worked closely with the authors and editors to maximize the impact of combining image and word.

At this time, Robert and fellow artists Eric Kimball, Barry Windsor-Smith and Jeffrey Jones formed the New Romantic Brotherhood. They promoted and published works based on an art philosophy they called New Romanticism: a blending of their common devotion to medieval and late nineteenth century Pre-Raphaelite and symbolist Art and philosophy expressed in their distinctly modern sensibilities.

Seeking to further push the boundaries of quality in image reproduction, Robert founded Cygnus in 1981 with partner Marc Halperin to support and publish works by contemporary fantasy artists that were of a fine art nature. Using archival materials and highly precise duotone reproduction methods, Cygnus produced "The Drawing Collection", a series of four boxed reproductions of pencil drawings by Gould, Barry Windsor-Smith, Jeffery Jones and Alan Lee. "The Drawing Collection" and the art prints that followed set a new standard for fantasy art reproduction. For it's innovative work in printing and fantasy publishing, Cygnus received many awards in the printing and fantasy fields and set the recognized standard for quality art reproduction in the fantasy genre.

In the late 1980s, Robert moved from Boston to Los Angeles and began spending more time in Devon, England with fellow artists Alan Lee and Brian Froud. Having always had a strong interest in the visual narrative aspects of film, Robert left the field of book design in 1991 to explore the possibilities of bringing fantasy and mythic fiction to the screen.

Robert served as Vice President of the Los Angeles based film production company, The Lynda Guber Organization (LGO), for six years. During his tenure under a production deal at Sony Pictures Entertainment, he was responsible for all administrative and development functions of the company, including selecting and attaching properties, writers and directors.

Robert's intimate experience with the studio development process challenged him to create a property development model that better served both the artist and the production company. Having worked with internationally recognized faery artist Brian Froud and contributed to the creation of Brian's international best seller, LADY COTTINGTON'S PRESSED FAIRY BOOK, Robert saw the exceptional cross media potential of the artist's work. He created an innovative business plan and subsequent agreement for LGO to exclusively represent Brian for three years in his publishing, licensing and entertainment concerns. To handle all publishing and licensing agreements, Robert attached The Beanstalk Group, the premiere independent licensing company in the US, with whom he had worked on DINOTOPIA.

In 1999 Robert formed Imaginosis, a media arts company that works with visual artists and writers to collaboratively create and strategically develop entertainment intellectual properties that have broad, transmedia applications while maintaining the integrity, quality, depth of imagination, vision, philosophy, locale, characters and paraphernalia unique to the property and the creator's original vision. In 2005, Robert formed Imaginosis Publishing, a division of Imaginosis.
Source: Robert Gould
Robert Gould art
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Janet & Anne Grahame Johnstone biography

Janet & Anne Grahame Johnstone biography

Janet & Anne Grahame Johnstone (1928 - 1979 (Janet) 1998 (Anne))
Janet Grahame Johnstone (1 June 1928 – 1979) and Anne Grahame Johnstone (1 June 1928 – 25 May 1998) were twin sisters and British children's book illustrators best known for their delicate, detailed prolific artwork and for illustrating Dodie Smith's classic book The Hundred and One Dalmatians

The twins were born in 1928 to successful British portraitist and costume designer Doris Zinkeisen and her husband, Captain Edward Grahame Johnstone. They attended the Heathfield School in Ascot, Berkshire during World War II; their artistic bent nurtured both at home and at school. Later, they attended Saint Martin's School of Art in London, where they studied period clothing styles before moving to Suffolk in 1966. The twins never married and would both live with their mother until their deaths (Zinkeisen died in 1991).

The Johnstone sisters' popularity took off in the early 1950s, when they were noticed by publishers and acquired a growing reputation as talented illustrators. They always worked together, passing drawings back and forth across their studio until both twins were satisfied with the final outcome. Janet specialized in animals and birds. Anne focused on the period costumes that so dominated their work. Because of their symbiotic collaboration, until the death of Janet in 1979, there was never a book illustrated under either one of their names alone.

The first important book the twins worked on was The Hundred and One Dalmatians by Dodie Smith, who was already a very successful playwright and author. In 1956 she invited them to illustrate her first children's book, and it was an immediate success, captivating parents and children alike. Eventually, Smith's book was made into a feature-length animated film by Walt Disney.

The twins' further success with later Smith books, The Starlight Barking and The Midnight Kittens, made them the most widely recognized illustrators of children's books in England at the time. Their business association developed into an enduring friendship until Smith died in November 1990.

Although not widely remembered, the twins at an early stage of their career worked extensively in British television, during the formative years of children's programming. They produced a considerable amount of artwork for programmes including "Tai Lu", "Andy Pandy," and "The Flower Pot Men." These programmes were very popular with British children during the 1950s and 1960s.

Over the course of their career together, the sisters illustrated more than 100 books. These included classic fairytales by Hans Christian Andersen, the Brothers Grimm, J. M. Barrie, Charles Kingsley, a series based on Biblical tales, Roger Lancelyn Green's Tales of the Greeks and Trojans (Purnell and Sons, London, 1963), as well as a large variety of rhyme and modern story-collections. Early commissions included Enid Blyton's Tales of Ancient Greece (1951), and new illustrations for a shocking old German children's morality book, Struwwelpeter (1950). The Johnstones illustrated many of Paul Gallico's magical children's stories, working on Manxmouse, The Man who was Magic, and Miracle in the Wilderness. Their most collectible book to date is Enid Blyton's 1979 Dean book, called, The Enchanted Wood.

Most of their work was done designing Christmas cards and illustrating numbers of large, brightly coloured gift books, mainly published by Dean. Their full-page illustrations surrounding nursery rhymes, fairy tales or children's prayers were in the tradition of undemanding effusiveness set by older artists like Hilda Boswell, still hugely popular with the public though increasingly frowned on by critics.

Janet and Anne also illustrated many company logos and advertisements, including a wine label designed by the twins for their own brand of wine (Chateau Badingham). Their work was also featured in the British children's magazine Finding Out.

In 1979, Janet died as a result of smoke inhalation following a fire in the kitchen, leaving Anne devastated and alone for the first time in her life. Their brother Murray described them together as one and a half rather than two people. Anne found herself unexpectedly responsible for the entire business enterprise previously shared with her sister, and managed to honour all of their outstanding commissions. She had to master the techniques for drawing and painting animals, particularly horses, which had been the specialty of her sister. Eventually she became so adept that she was elected a Member of the Society of Equestrian Artists in 1998.

On her own in the 1980s, Anne produced many fine illustrations. Two particularly notable books she illustrated were the editions of Peter Pan and The Water Babies, published by Award Publications. Each year she also produced Christmas cards for Royles, which were very popular. Other projects included designs for limited edition Christmas jigsaw puzzles for the British bookstore chain Waddingtons, and two books she wrote and illustrated about Santa Claus. Over the years, she became an expert in 19th-century military uniforms and often worked as an heraldic artist through the College of Arms. Anne died of liver cancer in Badingham, Suffolk on 25 May 1998 at the age of 69. She continued to work until two days before her death.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery & Wikipedia
Janet & Anne Grahame Johnstone art
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Maureen & Gordon Gray biography

Maureen & Gordon Gray biography

Maureen & Gordon Gray
For such prolific illustrators and strip artists, almost nothing is known about Maureen and Gordon Gray. Some library sources give their years of birth as 1932 (Gordon) and 1940 (Maureen), but that information should be treated with care.

Usually signing their work 'Gray', they were regular contributors to comics in the 1980s, producing Kid's Army, a Second World War strip loosely based on the TV sitcom Dad's Army, Fame, based on the TV show, and The Fantastic Adventures of Adam Ant, about pop-star Adam traveling through time to pop up at various points in history. These strips all appeared in DC Thomson's TV Tops comic in around 1982.

The Grays then began appearing in Look-In, contributing Bucks Fizz (1983-84), The Story So Far featuring Shaking Stevens (1985), A-Ha (1986) and Michael Jackson (1986), Airwolf (1986), The A-Team (1986-87) and Five Star Life (1987).

A later graphic novel is credited to Maureen Gray only: The Haunting of Julia (2007) is based on Mary Hooper's children's novel Thirteen Candles, described thus: "When Julia watches Dad's video of herself preparing to blow out the candles, she notices something weird and mysterious, a dark hazy shape, leaning over her shoulder. She's sure it blew out the candles, but what is it?" From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Harry Green biography

Harry Green biography

Harry Green (born 1920; UK)
A little-known artist, Harry Green contributed extensively to Look and Learn in the 1970s and 1980s, illustrating a variety of subjects ranging from historical buildings to football. However, it was as a transport illustrator that he really made his mark in the 1980 with the series "Britain's Railway Wonders". Green also contributed illustrations to Speed & Power in the 1970s.

His book illustrations include Architecture (1969), Architecture: The Great Art of Building (1969), Discovery of Australia (1969) and Discovery of South America (1970), some of which were jointly illustrated by Gwen Green who was also a prolific children's educational book illustrator. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Harry Green art
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Roland Green biography

Roland Green biography

Roland Green (1890 - 1972; UK)
Roland Green was a noted nature artist, particularly known for his pictures of birds, which he painted in oils and watercolours.

He was born Roland Green in Rainham, Kent, in January 1890, the son of Roland Green, a taxidermist, and his wife Emily Filmer whom he married in the 1880s. Roland was their third child and first son, following Ivy (1885) and Daisy Eunice (1886). According to one biography, Green's father "taught him how to skin, stuff and set up birds, which gave Roland a fine knowledge of anatomy and plumage. Whilst at school he showed a gift for drawing and painting birds and went on to study at the Rochester School of art as well as Regent Street Polytechnic."

By 1911, Green was working as an artist/lithographer in London, the family having moved to Seven Kings, Essex, where Green's father was now employed as a joiner in the building trade. He later moved to Hickling in Norfolk, where his work attracted the attention of Lord Desborough, owner of the Hickling Estate. Green was commissioned to paint the frieze on the walls of Whitelea Lodge depicting the birds of the Hickling Broad.

Green illustrated a number of books, including contributions to The Birds of Australia by Gregory Mathews (London, Witherby, 12 vols., 1910-27) following the death in 1912 of J. G. Keulemans, who illustrated the first four volumes. Other books include Birds in Flight by W. P. Pycraft, The Bird Book by Enid Blyton, Wing to Wing by E. H. Ware and The Ladybird Book of British Wild Animals by George Cansdale.

Green died in Norfolk in 1972, aged 82. He never married. A large collection – 120 watercolours and 7 oil paintings – of Green's artwork amassed by Commander David Joel, a schoolboy when he was first introduced to Green, was sold in 2012 with profits going to the Norfolk Wildlife Trust and the Norfolk and Norwich Naturalists' Society.

Joel said in an interview: "There was not anyone on the Broads who did not know about Roland Green. He lived in the reedbeds and people thought he was a hermit, but he was anything but. He was an extrovert who gave talks at school and loved enthusing children with his love of art ... Modern artists use photographs but Green worked only from observation and that is why his birds look absolutely real." Joel has written a tribute to Green, A Homage to Roland Green – His Norfolk Legacy (2012), published by St. Barbe Museum and Art Gallery, Lymington.

Note: Wikipedia gives his name as Roland J. Green, but there is no record of Green having a middle name or initial. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Roland Green art
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Rick Griffin biography

Rick Griffin biography

Rick Griffin (18 June 1944 - 18 August 1991; USA)
Like so many comic artists, Rick Griffin showed his talent as a youngster. He attended the Los Angeles Chouinard Art Institute where an instructor told him: "You cannot make art with a Rapidograph!" His singular drawing style developed - still using the Rapidograph - with practical experience on publications such as Surfer Magazine (he was an avid surfer), Car Toon Magazine, Hot Rod Cartoons and artwork for 'Big Daddy' Roth.

Settling in San Francisco in 1966, Rick Griffin's style reached maturity in the richly colored psychedelic concert posters he designed for Bill Graham's Fillmore and Chet Helm's Family Dog rock concerts. The famous 'Flying Eyeball' poster (Bill Graham #105) ranks as the most treasured of all his posters collected by fans and modern art museums alike.

Griffin drew comics for 'Zap' (with Victor Moscoso), 'Snatch' and 'Tales from the Tube', and created some several unforgettable designs for many album covers for the Grateful Dead and other San Francisco counter-culture rock bands of the sixties. Rick Griffin had a motorcycle accident on 15 August 1991 and died from his injuries a few days later.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
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Josep Gual biography

Josep Gual biography

Josep Gual i Tutusaus; Spain
Josep Gual i Tutusaus began his career working for publishers of his native Catalonia until he entered the international market by means of the agency Selecciones Ilustradas. In Spain, he drew for Toray serials like 'Brigada Secreta', 'Espionaje' and 'Las Enfermeras' in the 1960s. He was additionally the artist of 'Mark Danger' in Hurón (scripts by Manuel Dominguez Navarro, 1968), 'Adam & Evans' in Cómics (scripts by Victor Mora, 1972) and 'Jeff Blake, el Hombre de Pinkerton' in Kung-Fu (scripts Andreu Martín, 1983).

As for his agency work, he drew for Fleetway in Britain. Since 1969 he was one of the new illustrators of the Australian comic book 'Devil Doone', following the retirement of Hart Amos. In the 1970s, he contributed to Creepy and other American horror titles of publishers Skywald and Warren. Later on, Josep Gual drew the erotic newspaper strip 'George & Lynne' with scripts by Conrad Frost for the British daily The Sun.

Gual has drawn among others 'James Bond' for the Scandinavian publisher Semic (1980s) and Disney comics for Egmont (1980s, 1990s). For the German magazine Yps, he has drawn series 'Tommy, der Trommler'. In later years, he has drawn through the Comicon agency. Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
Josep Gual art
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Jackson Guice biography

Jackson Guice biography

Jackson Guice (born 27 June 1961; USA)
Jackson "Butch" Guice started working in the comics field in 1981. He did inks for Warlords of Light and Galexia Magazine at Astral. He then did artwork for 'Crusaders' and 'The Southern Knights' at Guild.

He joined Marvel, where he cooperated on the titles 'Micronauts', 'Avengers', 'Doctor Strange, Sorcerer Supreme', 'Indiana Jones', 'Iron Man', 'New Mutants', 'Alpha Flight', 'Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D.' and 'Thor' throughout the 1980s and early 1990s. He was also present in 'Nightbreed' published under the company's Epic imprint.

He has worked with writer Mike Baron on First Comics titles like 'Badger', 'Nexus' and 'The Chronicles of Corum'. At the start of 1987, Guice contributed to the 'Southern Knights' series, published by Comics Interview Publications.

Guice has also worked extensively DC Comics, doing among others a long run on 'Superman' in Action Comics, but also on 'Batman', 'The Flash', 'Ressurection Man', 'Agent Liberty' and 'Birds of Prey'. In addition, he did the 'The Terminator: Endgame' mini-series for Dark Horse. He also drew 'Eternal Warrior' and 'Bloodshot' for Valiant Comics, and 'Sliders: Narcotica' for Acclaim.

Guice left DC in Spring 2001, and went to Crossgen Comics. There, he became the penciller of the 'Ruse' series, about a supernatural detective. When CrossGen folded a couple of years later, Guice returned to DC to draw for 'JLA: Classified' and 'Aquaman: Sword of Atlantis', as well as Wildstorm's 'Storming Paradise'. He also returned to Marvel as an artist on 'Captain America' and 'Ultimate Origins'.
Source: Lambiek
Jackson Guice art
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Paul Gulacy biography

Paul Gulacy biography

Paul Gulacy (born 1953; USA)
Paul Gulacy is best known for his work on Marvel's 1970s title 'Master of Kung Fu', and on DC's 'Batman' in the 1990s. Just like Jim Steranko, Gulacy pioneered a kind of super-realistic, cinematic style, illustrating spy stories in particular. Working in collaboration with writers like Doug Moench, Paul Gulacy produced work on books like 'Shang-Chi', 'Master of Kung Fu', 'James Bond 007', 'Six from Sirius' and 'Batman'. Gulacy was the artist of one of the first US graphic novels, 'Sabre: Slow Fade of an Endangered Species', written by Don McGregor for Eclipse Enterprises in August 1978.

Gulacy has done magazine art for Hustler and Heavy Metal Magazine, and was a cover illustrator for Eclipse Enterprises, New Media Publising, Capital Comics, AC Comics, Dark Horse Comics and 'Hard Rider' paperbacks. He drew black-and-white comic stories for the Warren magazines Eerie and Vampirella, and in Epic Illustrated, in 1979-1980. Gulacy teamed up with Doug Moench again for the mini-series 'Six from Sirius' (1984), 'Six from Sirius II' (1986-1986) and 'Slash Maraud' (DC, 1987-1988). In the 1980s, he also worked on Eclipse Enterprises features like 'Airboy' and 'Valkyrie', and on 'Black Diamond' for AC Comics.

The 1990s brought contributions to many of DC's 'Batman' titles, such as 'Batman', 'Legends of the Dark Night', 'Batman: Prey' and 'Batman: Outlaws'. He also worked on the company's SF movie-related titles like 'Predator' and 'Star Wars'. Futher contributions were to Topps ('Zorro' and covers), Acclaim's Valiant imprint ('Bloodshot', 'Turok' and covers) and Penthouse Comix.

By 2002 he returned to the kung fu genre with the mini-series 'Shang-Chi: Master of Kung Fu', another collaboration with Doug Moench for Marvel Comics. During this period, he also drew the science-fiction/spy comic 'S.C.I. Spy' for DC. In 2006, he was assigned to do the Marvel mini-series 'Squadron Supreme: Hyperion vs Nighthawk' with Marc Guggenheim, which was followed by 'True Believers' with Cary Bates.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
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Roger Hall biography

Roger Hall biography

Roger Hall (born 26 December 1914; UK)
Roger Hall began earning his livelihood as an artist painting front-of-house display material for cinemas, a career path also followed by his good friend, the late Sam Peffer. Like Sam, Hall moved on to produce book covers and dust jackets for many British publishers and, later, found work with Design Bureau, whose artists were responsible for many of Hamlyn's "All Colour Paperbacks" in the late 1960s/early 1970s. It was here that the two finally met, remaining good friends until Sam's death earlier this year.

Roger Hall was born at St Barts Hospital on Boxing Day 1914, the son of a stoker who worked at Wimbledon Power Station. Hall grew up in Islington and showed an early interest in, and talent for, drawing. A few months after leaving school, he became a junior at the London Art Service, a firm specialising in cinema display work. At the age of 15 he worked on lettering huge, 48-sheet posters, banners and other advertising material.

After a while, Hall became desperate to move onto the artistic side of the operation in the studios below. One of the firm's artists, Bill Wiggins, suggested that he draw some specimen illustrations to show to the company's chief artist Oscar Brown and, using a Saturday Evening Post cover as his reference, Hall painted a town crier. Brown's terse response was to instruct Hall to "start downstairs on Monday".

After an apprenticeship of mixing paint and running errands, Hall began contributing life-size heads to displays, having spent every weekend studying portraits at the Tate and National Gallery. His hero was John Singer Sargent, the top portrait artist of his era and a master at the realistic portrayal of people. After a couple of years, Hall had developed a realistic style that allowed him to accurately paint up to twenty portrait panels a week from publicity brochures and photos. Given his output, he asked for a 2/6d. pay rise—bringing his wage up to £1 a week—and left when the firm prevaricated.

Now aged 18, he joined Art Display Services, a new firm based in a former banana warehouse off Shaftesbury Avenue who supplied hand-painted cut-out displays for cinema foyers. One of his most memorable assignments was a 20-foot high picture of Charles Bickford, made up from twelve pieces of 5 x 5-feet plywood, for the Regal, Marble Arch.

Hall continued this work until he was called up in 1941. Demobbed at the end of 1946, he joined Pulford Publicity to paint posters. For £16 a week—more than double the average wage— he painted between 200 and 300 posters for the firm, the first a quad poster featuring a large portrait of Michael Redgrave for Fame Is The Spur (1947). Other posters included Circle Of Danger (1951) and The Adventurers (1952).

After producing two or three posters a week for seven years, Hall found himself frustrated by the firm's boss, Eric Pulford, who insisted on designing and laying out all the work for Hall to finish. He left, turning to the thriving field of book cover illustration, producing dust jackets for Hutchinson and covers for Arrow, Pan, Corgi, Panther, Four Square, Mayflower and even Mills & Boon.

In the 1960s, he returned to painting film posters for Geoff Wright but, due to work commitments elsewhere, passed on the work to Sam Peffer in 1971. Hall, meanwhile, was working in television and film production work, also illustrating 14 Ladybird books in their 'Famous People' series.

Hall also illustrated three popular series for Collins: The Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew and The Three Investigators. In the late 1960s, Hall contributed cover illustrations to IPC's Princess Tina and, in the early 1970s, painted illustrations for the nursery comic Hey Diddle Diddle.

Sam Peffer recalls: "During one of my quieter spells in 1977, a phone call from Roger Hall led to a couple of jobs that gave us both a great deal of pleasure. He had been commissioned to paint murals stretching the length of the walls in two new Safeway supermarkets—one in South Norwood, the other at Blackfen, Sidcup—all expenses paid, and he needed another artist to assist him. Was I interested? I jumped at the opportunity. It was a totally new experience for me, and a very enjoyable one."

Hall moved to Spain in 1986, but travelled widely. He held three exhibitions before returning to the UK in 2003, retiring to Gloucestershire, where he continued to paint landscapes and local scenes.
Source: Steve Holland
Roger Hall art
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Frank Hampson biography

Frank Hampson biography

Frank Hampson (1918 - 1985, UK)
Frank Hampson was only thirteen when he got an assignment to draw sketches for Meccano Magazine. At the age of twenty, he started studying at the Victoria College of Arts & Sciences.

During World War II, he served in the Royal Army Service Corps and became a lieutenant. At the end of the war, freshly married, he started attending the Southport School of Arts and Crafts and tried to make a living doing freelance jobs. He met Marcus Morris, a vicar, who had ambitions for founding a national Christian magazine, The Anvil, with a special emphasis on material for youngsters.

Eventually, Morris employed Hampson full-time, and they created Eagle, the magazine that featured the popular Dan Dare comics, in 1950. Hampson started out doing all the work single-handedly, but soon gathered a large crew of hard-working artists around him, including artists Desmond Walduck, Harold Johns, and Donald Harley, as well as writers Alan Stranks and Arthur C. Clarke.

The years between 1955 and 1959 were the heyday of the Eagle studios. In addition to 'Dan Dare', Hampson has worked on a variety of other strips for Eagle, such as 'The Great Adventurer', 'Tommy Walls', 'Rob Conway' and 'The Road of courage'.

After this, with a new editor, Frank retired from the 'Dan Dare' strip, leaving it to Frank Bellamy. In 1975, he was given an award recognizing his work at the Comic Festival in Lucca. He died of a stroke in 1985.
Frank Hampson art

See also our FRANK HAMPSON BOOKS including The Man Who Drew Tomorrow and Tomorrow Revisited
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Martin Handford biography

Martin Handford biography

Martin Handford
The artist creator of Where's Wally (Where's Waldo in USA) with many magazine illustrations to his name, including Miss London..
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Jim Hanson biography

Jim Hanson biography

Jim Hanson
Jim Hanson is a British comics artist whose credits include the Bumpkin Billionaires for Whizzer and Chips and Buster, Son of Andy Capp for Buster (Comic), as well as Dennis the Menace in the Beano.
Jim Hanson art
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Dudley Hardy biography

Dudley Hardy biography

Dudley Hardy (15 January 1867 - 11 August 1922; Sheffield, UK)
Dudley Hardy, RI, ROI, RBA, RMS, PS, was an English painter and illustrator.

Hardy was the eldest son of the marine painter Thomas Bush Hardy, under whose influence and tutelage he first learned to draw and paint. In 1882 he attended the Düsseldorf Academy where he remained for three years. After a further two years' study in Paris and at Antwerp Academy he returned to England to live and work in London.

In 1885 Hardy began exhibiting at the Royal Academy, an association that lasted to his death. His painting, Sans Asile (1889), a view of rough sleepers in Trafalgar Square, was exhibited at the Paris Salon, and the Royal Society of British Artists Gallery in 1893; it was this painting that established his reputation. Sans Asile and his 1889 painting Dock Strike (London Dock Strike), were part of a wider artistic and statistical examination highlighting London poverty.

The preferred subjects for his work became the Middle East and Brittany; painting scenes of desert life and Breton peasantry. Although not visiting the Sudan he became a 'War Artist' for the 1890s Sudanese War, providing illustrations for London periodicals. His interest in illustration led to the production of French graphic influenced poster imagery, most notably the Yellow Girl advertisement for Today magazine, and Gaiety Girls, a series of posters depicting actresses of the Gaiety Theatre. Further illustrations were for the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company and the Savoy Theatre. Much of Hardy's illustrative work is held at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

In the early 1900s he produced a range of comical postcards, and in 1909 a series of caricatures for the souvenir programme of the Doncaster Aviation Meeting, England's first airshow.

Hardy was chosen by art instructor Percy V. Bradshaw as one of the artists to illustrate "The Art of the Illustrator", the seminal collection of twenty portfolios demonstrating six stages of a single painting or drawing by twenty different artists and published in 1918.

Hardy joined his friend George Haité as a founder member of the London Sketch Club; and became the club's president. He later joined the Eccentric Club.

Dudley Hardy died in London of heart failure in 1922, and was buried at Brookwood Cemetery near Woking in Surrey
Source: Wikipedia & Illustration Art Gallery
Dudley Hardy art
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Wilf Hardy biography

Wilf Hardy biography

Wilfred Hardy (7 July 1938 - 2016; Brentford, UK)
Wilf Hardy began working for Treasure in its early days after working as a commercial artist. Some of his earliest illustrations were designed to help youngsters understand subjects ranging from building a motorway to the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race. Hardy is best known for his technological paintings, in particular planes, ships, trains and spacecraft.

Hardy became one of the mainstays of Fleetway's educational titles, working for Look and Learn, Ranger, Speed & Power and World of Knowledge. His best known series was the long running Into the Blue which helped establish him as an aviation artist of renown, an area he has continued working in - nowadays in oil and other media - for posters and private commissions.

Producing the series 'Into the Blue' in Ranger and Look and Learn for some years helped Hardy develop an ability to depict aircraft of every description, from the days of stick and string to futuristic zeppelins. Hardy often picked the subject matter himself, although the text was usually editorially written, and designed the layouts for his pages.

'Hardy's Drawing Board' was a popular feature in later issues of Look and Learn. Hardy is a member of the Guild of Aviation Artists.

Hardy enjoyed a long association with the International Air Tattoo (started 1971, became the Royal International Air Tattoo in 1996) and illustrated many advertising posters, brochure covers (and latterly, quite possibly T-shirts and mugs) for this and other air shows and events.

Wilfred Hardy lived in Kent. He married Barbara Woolstencroft in 1960 in Kent. They had three sons (born 1961, 1963 and 1965).
Source: Illustration Art Gallery & Bear Alley Blog
Wilf Hardy art
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Don Harley biography

Don Harley biography

Donald Eric Harley (born 1927; London, UK)
Don Harley was born in London in 1927, and studied at Epsom College of Art, where Frank Hampson visited to give a talk about the Eagle and the comic strip Dan Dare. Harley soon applied for and got a job in Hampson's studio.

He became the backbone of the Dan Dare strip, especially during Hampson's periods of illness, and worked with Hampson, Eric Eden and Joan Porter until the studio was disbanded in 1959 after Odhams Press took over the paper. He remained on the strip for a time, drawing the second page while Frank Bellamy did the first, from scripts by Eden. After a year Bellamy left the strip and Harley became the lead artist, assisted by Bruce Cornwell, until 1962 when a new team of writer David Motton and artist Keith Watson took over.

He later drew "Thunderbirds" in Countdown (1971-72), and worked in nursery comics in the 1980s.
Source: UK Comics Wiki
Don Harley art
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John Harrold biography

John Harrold biography

John Harrold (born 1947)
John Harrold first drew Rupert for the Daily Express in 1973 for Fun to Cook with Rupert, and his first Rupert the Bear story and annual work was in 1976. John is still illustrating Rupert today, almost 30 years later, and although living and working in France, he makes time to be at Canterbury (Rupert's birthplace) for Rupert's Birthday celebration in November each year.
John Harrold art

Please note that we also have Rupert Bear art by John Harrold and other Rupert Bear art.
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Andrew Haslen biography

Andrew Haslen biography

Andrew Haslen
Andrew Haslen is a member of the Society of Wildlife Artists. His work appears in many British bird books.
Andrew Haslen art
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John Hassall biography

John Hassall biography

John Hassall (21 May 1868 - 8 March 1948; Kent)
John Hassall was an English illustrator known for his advertisements and poster designs.

Hassall was born in Walmer, Kent, and was educated in Worthing, at Newton Abbot College, and at Neuenheim College, Heidelberg. After twice failing entry to The Royal Military Academy Sandhurst, he emigrated to Manitoba in Canada in 1888 to begin farming with his brother Owen. He returned to London two years later when he had drawings accepted by the Graphic. At the suggestion of Dudley Hardy (along with Cecil Aldin, a lifelong friend), he studied art in Antwerp and Paris. During this time he was influenced by the famous poster artist Alphonse Mucha.

In 1895, he began work as an advertising artist for David Allen & Sons, a career which lasted fifty years and included such well-known projects as the poster "Skegness Is so Bracing" (1908). Between 1896 and 1899 alone, he produced over 600 theatre poster designs for this firm while, at the same time, providing illustrations to several illustrated newspapers. Making use of flat colours enclosed by thick black lines, his poster style was very suitable for children's books, and he produced many volumes of nursery rhymes and fairy stories, now fetching high prices on eBay, such as Mother Goose’s Nursery Rhymes (1909).

In 1901, Hassall was elected to the membership of the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours and the Royal Society of Miniature Painters. He also belonged to several clubs, including the Langham (until 1898), the Savage, and the London Sketch Club, of which he was a President from 1903-1904.

In 1900, Hassall opened his own New Art School and School of Poster Design in Kensington where he numbered Bert Thomas, Bruce Bairnsfather, H. M. Bateman and Harry Rountree among his students. The school was closed at the outbreak of the First World War. In the post-war period, he ran the very successful John Hassall Correspondence School.

John Hassall was the father of poet Christopher Hassall and the printmaker Joan Hassall, OBE. He was also the grandfather of the actress Imogen Hassall and grandfather (and surrogate father) to noted "green" architect, David Dobereiner.

Arguably John Hassall's most famous creation was "The Jolly Fisherman" in 1908, which is regarded as one of the most famous holiday advertisements of all time. His 1910 design for the Kodak Girl, in her iconic striped blue and white dress, became a feature of Kodak's advertising to the 1970s. Hassall's design was continually updated to reflect changing fashions and trends and was longer lasting and of greater international significance than his Jolly Fisherman.
Source: Wikipedia
John Hassall art
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William Hatherell biography

William Hatherell biography

William Hatherell (1855 - 1928)
William Hatherell was a Victorian era illustrator who worked for magazines such as The Graphic, Harpers, Scribner's and the Century.

Today he is mostly remembered for crudely printed images as sadly the printing technology in Hatherell's day was pretty primitive. Combined with cheap paper stock, it stripped Hatherell's work of much of its sensitivity and expressiveness. Of course, like all resourceful artists Hatherell made the best of his limitations; he emphasized strong compositions and high contrasts that could survive the publication process.

Hatherell might easily have used the disadvantages of his medium as an excuse for dashing off fast, limited work. Many artists did. In fact, his employers encouraged him to do so, in order to increase productivity and profits. Instead, Hatherell worked carefully and deliberately, crafting sensitive pictures with subtle features that were undetectable to his larger audience. As one contemporary noted, Hatherell stubbornly refused to lower his standards:

Hatherell became noted for his refusal to be pressured into hasty work. For illustrating current events, for instance, he used models, often carefully posed in his backyard. When you go back and look at Hatherell's original pictures, you can see the extra effort he put into touches such as subtle shading and expressive faces and gestures.

Hatherell toiled his entire life accepting that publication would degrade the quality of his pictures. He had no defense to this handicap except his wits and his personal integrity. Of course, today almost any artist can publish sharp, high resolution images to the world at the push of a button. We tend to underestimate the competitive advantage that this gives our work over the work of our talented predecessors such as Hatherell.

These delicate touches were difficult and time consuming. Many of them would be undetectable by the reading public. Why did he do all that extra work trying to get it right?

Hatherell was chosen by art instructor Percy V. Bradshaw as one of the artists to illustrate "The Art of the Illustrator", the seminal collection of twenty portfolios demonstrating six stages of a single painting or drawing by twenty different artists and published in 1918 that has, somewhat ironically, stood the test of time.

Hatherell and some of his peers were a lot better than we remember them today, based on their published work. Now that it is possible to recapture the true quality of their original pictures, we owe it to them to honor all those long afternoons they put into trying to get it right when they thought no one might ever know the difference.
Source: Illustration Art Blogspot
William Hatherell art
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Jack Hayes biography

Jack Hayes biography

Jack Hayes; UK
Artist who contributed a number of superb illustrations to The Bible Story. Almost nothing is known about Hayes' career. His known works include the illustrations for The New Oxford Illustrated Bible (Oxford University Press, n.d.), Flags of the World by I. O. Evans (Hamlyn, 1970).

In the early 1970s he illustrated paperback covers for Corgi and Fontana on titles as wide-ranging as The Long Wait and Kiss Me, Deadly by Mickey Spillane (both 1970), Too Few For Drums by R. F. Delderfield and Only the Valiant. Great Legends of the West by Charles Marquis Warren (both 1972) and The Gallows Herd by Maureen Peters and Steamboat Gothic by Frances Parkinson Keyes (both 1973).
Source: Look and Learn
Jack Hayes art
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Gerry Haylock biography

Gerry Haylock biography

Gerald A Haylock (born 1928; Kent, UK)
Gerry Haylock was a British comic artist from Bromley, Kent, who was active from the 1950s throughout the 1970s. He worked as an artist for Eagle and its female counterpart Girl in the 1950s and 1960s.

For Eagle, he was a regular artist on 'The Guinea Pig', and he also drew features like 'Knights Of The Road' between 1960 and 1962.

For Girl, he illustrated stories like 'A Cosy Christmas', 'White Queen of Calabar', 'Persia's Lady Mary' and 'Angel of Mercy'.

He was also present in Countdown (with 'U.F.O.' in 1971) and Joe 90 (with 'Land of the Giants'). He was an artist for the 'Doctor Who' comic stories for TV Action (1971-1973) and TV Comic (1973-1975, 1978) and painted covers for Schoolgirls' Picture Library.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
Gerry Haylock art
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Helen Haywood biography

Helen Haywood biography

Helen Haywood (1908 - 1995; UK)
Helen Haywood was an English writer and illustrator of children's books. She was born in England in 1908 but was taken as a child to Chile, where her father, an engineer, worked on the trans-Andean railway. She remained in Chile until she was approximately 15 years old. Her experiences were recounted in an unpublished novel,"Childhood in Chile."

Her books were published by Thomas Nelson Ltd through the 1950s and 1960s. She created a series of books based around the character Peter Tiggywig and friends. Books written and illustrated by Helen Haywood in the Tiggywig series: - Peter Tiggywig Goes Camping; Peter Tiggywig Runs Away; Peter Tiggywig's Wonderful Train; Peter Tiggywig At School; Peter Tiggywig's Birthday Party; Peter Tiggywig At The Picnic; Peter Tiggywig's Toy-shop; Peter Tiggywig At Sea.

Other work includes Master Mouse the Madcap (1958), and Animal Playtime and Animal Worktime which appeared in the Look with Mother series, and a paperback series for children published by Nelson including 'Aesop's Fables'(1965) 'Brer Rabbit' and the 'Water Babies' (abridged).

Miss Haywood was a keen student of science and an amateur naturalist and anthropologist. Many of the books she illustrated for the publisher Hutchinson & Co., London, were keenly observed and scrupulously accurate depictions of plants, birds and animals. When commissioned to do illustrations for a children's book on dinosaurs, her research into the skin colors she subsequently chose for her dinosaur illustrations was cited by the Royal Academy of Sciences.

Haywood was also a practitioner of the art of fore-edge painting. She became acquainted with the art form through an uncle who was associated with the Bayntun-Riviere Bindery of Bath. She did several fore-edge and double fore-edge paintings on commission every year from the 1930s to the 1970s for Inman's Books, an antiquarian book dealer in New York City.

She died in Bournemouth, England in 1995.
Helen Haywood art
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Reginald Heade biography

Reginald Heade biography

Reginald Cyril Webb (1901 - 1957; London, UK)
Reginald Heade is considered by many to be the greatest British 'Good Girl' artist of the 1950s. Heade was in fact a pseudonym, his actual name being Reginald Cyril Webb.

Heade is intrinsically linked to the lurid pulps written by Hank Janson (Stephen D. Frances) of the crime / sexploitation genre.

Reg Heade only produced a few covers for the Thriller Comics Library but they were of quite exceptional quality. He is, of course, noted for his 'girlie art' covers for the Hank Janson series of paperback "hard-boiled" thrillers for the author/publisher, Stephen Frances, but he also produced some superb Western paperback covers for Archer Books in the late '40s, four sensitively painted colour plates for The Adventures of Robin Hood published by Collins, powerful illustrations in bold colour for a series of children's classics for Partridge Publications Ltd., dust jackets for W.E. Johns' Worrals books, some covers for A.P.'s Sexton Blake Library and later, under the name "Cy Webb", extraordinarily-detailed work for Pan and Panther.

It was a pity he did no strip work for the T.C.L. for he was an excellent exponent of the art as can be seen in his strip work for Knockout in the late '40s, the Robin Hood strip he did for Sun in the early 1950s and his beautiful version of When Knights Were Bold that he painted in monochrome for Playhour, filling in for Arthur Horowicz. Born in Forest Gate, London, it appears that the name "Heade" was, in fact, a pseudonym and that the artist's true name was simply Reginald Cyril Webb.
Source: David Ashford and Norman Wright
Reginald Heade art
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Thomas Heath Robinson biography

Thomas Heath Robinson biography

Thomas Heath Robinson (1869 - 1953)
T. Heath Robinson was an English illustrator of books and magazines, in both line drawings and full color. He illustrated many books for Allen, Nisbit, Dent, Sands and others as well as illustrations for magazines and adventure strips, including Cassell's Family Magazine, The Idler, Pall Mall Magazine, Told in Pictures and The Strand.

Born into a family of artists, Thomas Heath Robinson - like his younger brothers, Charles and William - followed in the footsteps of his father (who was chief illustrator for The Penny Illustrated Paper (1838–1902)) and uncle (who worked for The Illustrated London News). William Heath Robinson is today the most famous of the three, with Thomas the least known.

Thomas first studied at the Islington School of Art in about 1885. His plan was to build a career as an illustrator. Accordingly, he submitted his portfolio to several publishers and was rewarded with his first commission, in 1893, to produce a series of line drawings for a short story by popular novelist, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, for the Pall Mall Magazine. The monthly Magazine was launched in 1893 as an off-shoot of the extremely successful newspaper, the Pall Mall Gazette. Its aim was to offer well-illustrated short stories, poetry and serialised novels. Within a short time, it had established a reputation for commissioning leading writers and artists to produce work for the publication. Thus, Thomas Heath Robinson found his career launched in a new and popular paper illustrating the work of a well-established writer of sensational stories.

Two years later, in 1895, Robinson was commissioned to illustrate what turned out to be a remarkable book, by Frank Rinder, Old World Japan - Legends of the Land of the Gods. From the gilt illustration of a graceful Japanese lady on the green cloth cover, to the black and white vignettes and full-page illustrations peppered through the text, this book is a gem. Clearly, it reveals contemporary enthusiasm for things Japanese - a taste which had burgeoned since the 1860s and the reopening of Japan to the West - and also Robinson’s remarkable talent and agility as an illustrator. Certainly, he must have looked to Japanese prints and have been excited by the plunging perspectives, asymmetrical patterns and the incisive lines. It is also interesting to compare Robinson’s illustrations with those produced, in the same year, by the young Aubrey Beardsley for Thomas Malory’s Morte d’Arthur. Beardsley, of course, had learned much from Japanese prints. He had also been excited by the work of artists such as Toulouse Lautrec, whose stylishly erotic posters were beginning to adorn the walls of Paris in the early ‘90s. Beardsley had already made his public debut as an illustrator in April, 1893, with his striking interpretation of Oscar Wilde’s femme fatale, Salome, in the art magazine, The Studio. In contrast, Thomas Heath Robinson's illustrations for Rinder’s book on Japan do not have the same static figures, tense with eroticism, that we find in Beardsley, but they do reveal a vivid exploration of the power of black and white in illustrations that are at once full of sinuous, Art Nouveau movement and rich with exoticism. Robinson and Beardsley must have been well aware of one another's work.

Robinson had made his name and - during these years when finely-illustrated books reached levels of quality and popularity which they have probably never exceeded - he was in demand as one of the leading black and white artists of the period. Indeed, he led the way for his brothers, Charles and William, who also launched themselves as successful illustrators in the 1890s and early 1900s.

In the first decade of his career, Thomas Heath Robinson illustrated over 30 books, in addition to work in magazines and other journals. At the same time, he began to work in colour, developing his skills in oil paintings, focusing on landscapes and portraits. From 1906, when he moved to the London suburb of Pinner, his family and the local countryside were often the subjects he loved most.

The First War brought with it many problems. Work dried up; the market for fine, illustrated books dwindled. Heath Robinson might have been struggling, financially, but this did not stop him from continuing to sketch and paint. Indeed, it was after the War that he and his brothers – popularly called the ‘three musketeers’ - joined the Langham Sketching Club. Established as early as 1838, this had long been the home of some of the best black and white illustrators. Weekly, artists gathered together to sketch and then to enjoy a discussion about their work. They held regular exhibitions and these proved popular with the public and dealers.

Before the First War, Robinson had already been commissioned to illustrate several history books for children, by the publisher, Blackie. Frequently printed in colour, Robinson's lithographs make clear his increasingly bold use of composition, perspective and pattern. After the War, the revival of a market for illustrated books was tardy but, by the 1920s, Robinson was being commissioned once again, especially to produce illustrations to children’s books. From this time on, some of his best work must have enriched the lives of inter-War children and introduced them to history, science, literature and adventure through books issued by several publishers, including Blackie and Cassell.

Thomas Heath Robinson continued to paint in oils. Quite often, his pictures were preparatory work for some of his lithographic illustrations. These paintings are very engaging. Given that the illustrations were aimed largely at children, the oils immediately capture attention: patterns of busy movement; the action staged in the foreground; emphatic silhouettes; the drama heightened by the use of patches of strong, complementary colours. There is a joyousness to these pictures, a sense that Robinson, in his imagination, is in the midst of it all; there is even a hint of the ridiculous - which reminds us that, in the inter-War years, William Heath Robinson, Thomas’s brother and close neighbour, built a reputation based almost entirely on a comic output.

Robinson retired to St Ives - which was, of course, an artists’ colony as well as a place he had enjoyed on many holidays. Until the end, he continued to work. Focusing mainly on oil paintings, these were now usually divorced from the demands of lithographic reproduction. He never lost the compositional devices he had learned from his early studies - of Japanese prints, photography and fin de siècle black and white illustrations - and he continued to focus on dramatic narratives. But - perhaps in response to the delights of St Ives - his palette lightened and his colour became more variegated and subtle, applied with a deft and painterly touch.

Thomas Heath Robinson’s work is well worth searching for. His brilliant, black and white illustrations, comic strips, the theatrical paintings he produced in preparation for his vivid colour lithographs and the sketches and oil paintings of his later years reveal an artist who continued to experiment throughout his life. The art dealer, Chris Beetles, in 1992, was one of the first to recognise the worth of all three of the Heath Robinson brothers and produced The Brothers Robinson, which is a wonderfully well-illustrated account of their work. Thomas, the eldest, may now be the least well-known, but he was probably the most adventurous and certainly not the least gifted.
Source: Howgill Tattershall Fine Art & The Illustration Art Gallery
Thomas Heath Robinson art
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William Heath Robinson biography

William Heath Robinson biography

William Heath Robinson (31 May 1872 - 13 September 1944; London, UK)
William Heath Robinson was an English cartoonist and illustrator best known for drawings of ridiculously complicated machines for achieving simple objectives.

In the UK, the term "Heath Robinson" entered the language during the 1914–1918 First World War as a description of any unnecessarily complex and implausible contrivance, much as "Rube Goldberg machines" came to be used in the US from the 1920s onwards as a term for similar efforts. "Heath Robinson contraption" is perhaps more often used in relation to temporary fixes using ingenuity and whatever is to hand, often string and tape, or unlikely cannibalisations. Its continuing popularity was undoubtedly linked to Second World War Britain's shortages and the need to "make do and mend".

William Heath Robinson was born at 25 Ennis Road on 31 May 1872 into a family of artists in an area of London known as Stroud Green, Finsbury Park, north London. His father Thomas Robinson (1838-1902) and brothers Thomas Heath Robinson (1869-1954) and Charles Robinson (1870–1937) all worked as illustrators.

His early career involved illustrating books – among others: Hans Christian Andersen's Danish Fairy Tales and Legends (1897), The Arabian Nights (1899), Tales from Shakespeare (1902), Gargantua and Pantagruel (1904),<Actinic:Variable Name = '2'/> Twelfth Night (1908), Andersen's Fairy Tales (1913), A Midsummer Night's Dream (1914), Charles Kingsley's The Water-Babies (1915) and Walter de la Mare's Peacock Pie (1916).

In the course of his work, Robinson also wrote and illustrated three children's books, The Adventures of Uncle Lubin (1902), Bill the Minder (1912) and Peter Quip in Search of a Friend (1922). Uncle Lubin is regarded as the start of his career in the depiction of unlikely machines.

During the First World War, he drew large numbers of cartoons, depicting ever-more-unlikely secret weapons being used by the combatants. He also depicted the American Expeditionary Force in France.

W Heath Robinson was chosen by art instructor Percy V. Bradshaw as one of the artists to illustrate "The Art of the Illustrator", a celebrated collection of twenty portfolios demonstrating six stages of a single painting or drawing by twenty different artists and published in 1918.

He also produced a steady stream of humorous drawings for magazines and advertisements. In 1934 he published a collection of his favourites as Absurdities, such as:
"The Wart Chair. A simple apparatus for removing a wart from the top of the head"
"Resuscitating stale railway scones for redistribution at the station buffets"
"The multimovement tabby silencer", which automatically threw water at serenading cats

Most of his cartoons have since been reprinted many times in multiple collections.

The machines he drew were frequently powered by steam boilers or kettles, heated by candles or a spirit lamp and usually kept running by balding, bespectacled men in overalls. There would be complex pulley arrangements, threaded by lengths of knotted string. Robinson's cartoons were so popular that in Britain the term "Heath Robinson" is used to refer to an improbable, rickety machine barely kept going by incessant tinkering. (The corresponding term in the U.S. is Rube Goldberg, after the American cartoonist born just over a decade later, with an equal devotion to odd machinery. Similar "inventions" have been drawn by cartoonists in many countries, with the Danish Storm Petersen being on par with Robinson and Goldberg.)

One of his most famous series of illustrations was that which accompanied the first Professor Branestawm book written by Norman Hunter. The stories told of the eponymous professor who was brilliant, eccentric and forgetful and provided a perfect backdrop for Robinson's drawings.

One of the automatic analysis machines built for Bletchley Park during the Second World War to assist in the decryption of German message traffic was named "Heath Robinson" in his honour. It was a direct predecessor to the Colossus, the world's first programmable digital electronic computer.

In 1903 he married Josephine Latey, the daughter of newspaper editor John Latey. Heath Robinson moved to Pinner, Middlesex, in 1908. His house in Moss Lane is commemorated by a blue plaque.

He died in September 1944 during the Second World War and is buried in East Finchley Cemetery.

The Heath Robinson Museum opened in October 2016 to house a collection of nearly 1,000 original artworks owned by The William Heath Robinson Trust. The museum is in Memorial Park, Pinner, close to where the artist lived and worked. A nearby branch of the Pizza Express restaurants features designs inspired by the artist's work.

The name "Heath Robinson" became part of common parlance in the UK for complex inventions that achieved absurdly simple results following its use as services slang during the 1914–1918 First World War.

During the Falklands War (1982), British Harrier aircraft lacked their conventional "chaff"-dispensing mechanism. Therefore, Royal Navy engineers designed an impromptu delivery system of welding rods, split pins and string which allowed six packets of chaff to be stored in the airbrake well and deployed in flight. Due to its improvised and ramshackle nature it was often referred to as the "Heath Robinson chaff modification".
Source: Wikipedia
William Heath Robinson art
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Robert Heindel biography

Robert Heindel biography

Robert Heindel (born 1938; Ohion, USA)
Born in Toledo, Ohio, in 1938, he was drawing and painting from an early age.

In 1958 he married Rosalie Petres, his high school sweetheart, who was to remain a major inspiration and support throughout his artistic career. Most of his works carry a tiny rose in dedication to her. In 1966, the couple was given tickets to see Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nureyev perform “Paradise Lost,” an evening that changed the course of his life. Thereafter the ballet would be his focus.

Mr. Heindel's initial paintings of individual dancers eventually led to close associations with well-known dance companies in the United States, among them the San Francisco Ballet, the Atlanta Ballet, and American Ballet Theatre. His intensely personal studies often capture the private moment - the dancer in repose, the dancer at the barre, the dancer in rehearsal. Mr. Heindel's painting style evolved over the years. Although one usually associates his work with lush color, sensuous form, and subtle lighting, many of his later paintings are strong abstract statements, sometimes dark and enigmatic.

His international success was founded on his first major exhibition in London in 1985, titled “Obsession of Dance,” which was attended by Her Royal Highness The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowden. Numerous exhibitions in London followed, winning him widespread acclaim throughout Europe. The late Diana, Princess of Wales, an admirer of his art, once wrote to him, “Experts hold your work in the highest regard, I know, but for me it simply succeeds in capturing the spirit of dance as art.” In the 1990s he expanded his artistic horizons by accepting a commission to design sets and costumes for David Bintley's “The Dancehouse.” He also painted, at the invitation of Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber, scenes from the stage performances of “Cats” and “The Phantom of the Opera,” the posters for which have since become classics.

By the early 1990s, Mr. Heindel was showing in Tokyo, having gained the attention of His Imperial Highness Prince Norihito Takamado. Since then he has exhibited in Japan almost annually. Reflecting his mastery of diverse art forms, Mr. Heindel painted vibrant images of the traditional Noh and Kabuki theaters in addition to those of avant-garde dance groups.

His paintings hang in London's National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian Institution, in Washington, D.C. Collectors of his work have included Princess Diana, Princess Margaret, Prince Takamado, Princess Caroline of Monaco, Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber, Sir Anthony Dowell, Michael Crawford, George Lucas, Harold Prince, and David Bintley.
Source: http://www.blouinartinfo.com/artists/robert-heindel-5976
Robert Heindel art
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Fred Hembeck biography

Fred Hembeck biography

Fred Hembeck (born 30 January 1953; USA)
Fred Hembeck is an American comics artist, as well as a writer about comics. Since the 1970s, he has created countless of parodies on DC and Marvel superhero comics. His Marvel parodies were collected in 'Fantastic Four Roast' and 'Fred Hembeck Destroys the Marvel Universe', his DC gags ran in the Daily Planet.

Among his most notable parodies are his classic cover redos and 'Petey, The Adventures of Peter Parker Before He Became Spiderman', that appeared in Marvel Tales. Throughout the years, he has created a variety of characters, such as, 'The Dog' (in Smilin' Ed in 1980), 'Mr. Mumbo Jumbo' (in Topps Comics Satan's Six in 1993), the autobiographical 'Little Freddy'. He has also drawn for the underground publications of FantaCo Enterprises.
Source: Lambiek
Fred Hembeck art
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Mike Heslop biography

Mike Heslop biography

Michael Peter Heslop
Mike Heslop painted the 1st US editions of Greenwitch (1974), The Grey King (1975) and Silver on the Tree (1977). His illustrations were also used for the dustwrappers of the UK 1st editions published by Chatto & Windus and Corgi and Puffin paperback UK cover illustrations in the same years.

Heslop is not the rock musician of the same name, nor Michael P Heslop the golf artist.
Mike Heslop art
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Burne Hogarth biography

Burne Hogarth biography

Burne Hogarth (25 December 1911 – 28 January 1996; Chicago, USA)
Burne Hogarth was an American cartoonist, illustrator, educator, author and theoretician, best known for his pioneering work on the Tarzan newspaper comic strip and his series of anatomy books for artists.

Burne Hogarth was born in Chicago in 1911, the son of a housewife and a carpenter. His parents were immigrants from Eastern Europe. He displayed an early talent for drawing. His father saved these efforts and, some years later, presented them and the young Hogarth to the registrar at the Art Institute of Chicago. At age 12, Hogarth was admitted, thus embarking on a long formal education that took him through such institutions as Chicago's Crane College and Northwestern University, and New York City's Columbia University in New York City -- all the while, studying arts and sciences.

Due to his father's premature death, Hogarth began work at age 15, when he became the assistant at the Associated Editors Syndicate and illustrated a series called Famous Churches of the World. He worked for several years as an editor and advertising artist. This work provided steady (and, by 1929, crucial) employment. In 1929, he drew his first comic strip, Ivy Hemmanhaw, for the Barnet Brown Company; in 1930 he drew Odd Occupations and Strange Accidents for Ledd Features Syndicate.

As the Great Depression worsened, Hogarth relocated to New York City at the urging of friends. He found employment with King Features Syndicate in 1934, drawing Charles Driscoll's pirate adventure Pieces of Eight (1935). In 1936 came the assignment that catapulted Hogarth's illustration career. With Tarzan, Hogarth brought together classicism, expressionism and narrative into a new form of dynamic, sequential art: the newspaper comic strip. Hogarth drew the Tarzan "Sunday (newspaper comic strip) page" for 12 years (1937–45; 1947–50). This work has been reprinted often, most recently by NBM Publishing.

Almost as long as he was a professional artist, Hogarth was a teacher. Over the years, he was an instructor of drawing to a variety of students at a number of institutions, and by 1944 Hogarth had in mind a school for returning World War II veterans. The Manhattan Academy of Newspaper Art was Hogarth's first formal effort, and by 1947 he had transformed it into the Cartoonists and Illustrators School. This academy continued to grow, and in 1956 was again renamed, as the School of Visual Arts (SVA), now one of the world's leading art schools. Hogarth designed the curriculum, served as an administrator and taught a full schedule that included drawing, writing and art history. Hogarth retired from the SVA in 1970 but continued to teach at the Parsons School of Design and, after a move to Los Angeles, the Otis School and Art Center College of Design in Pasadena.

During his years teaching, Hogarth authored a number of anatomy and drawing books. Dynamic Anatomy (1958) and Drawing the Human Head (1965) were followed by further investigations of the human form. Dynamic Figure Drawing (1970) and Drawing Dynamic Hands (1977) completed the figure cycle. Dynamic Light and Shade (1981) and Dynamic Wrinkles and Drapery (1995) explored other aspects relative to rendering the figure.

After more than 20 years away from strip work Hogarth returned to sequential art in 1972 with Tarzan of the Apes, a large-format hardbound graphic narrative published by Watson Guptill in 11 languages. He followed with Jungle Tales of Tarzan (1976), integrating previously unattempted techniques such as hidden, covert, and negative space imagery with inspired color themes into a harmonious visual description, a pinnacle of narrative art. These texts, in addition to Hogarth's strip work, exert a pervasive and ongoing influence within the global arts community and among delighted readers everywhere.

His energetic speeches were known for addressing any topic that was thrown at him with a lengthy string of ideas that could cover the French Revolution and amusement parks by way of Postmodernism and graffiti art, meandering through economics and globalization, only to return to an enlightened answer to the original question. In his teaching he was known for a vigorous and surprising approach, which could include instructions such as: "Paint me this sound: a spider walking on his web. What is the music of that sound?"

He received recognition for his work in the United.States., including the National Cartoonist Society Advertising and Illustration Award for 1975, Magazine and Book Illustration Award for 1992, and Special Features Award for 1974, and dozens of awards internationally. He taught, wrote, created and theorized lucidly and passionately into his last days. For decades he was regularly invited to international events, frequently in a starring capacity. Shortly after attending the Angoulême International Comics Festival in 1996, Hogarth returned to Paris where he suffered heart failure, dying January 28 at age 84. In 2010 Hogarth was inducted into the Will Eisner Award Hall of Fame.
Source: Wikipedia
Burne Hogarth art
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William Hogarth biography

William Hogarth biography

William Hogarth (10 November 1697 - 26 October 1764; London, England)
William Hogarth FRSA was an English painter, printmaker, pictorial satirist, social critic, and editorial cartoonist who has been credited with pioneering western sequential art.

His work ranged from realistic portraiture to comic strip-like series of pictures called "modern moral subjects". Knowledge of his work is so pervasive that satirical political illustrations in this style are often referred to as "Hogarthian".

William Hogarth was born at Bartholomew Close in London to Richard Hogarth, a poor Latin school teacher and textbook writer, and Anne Gibbons. In his youth he was apprenticed to the engraver Ellis Gamble in Leicester Fields, where he learned to engrave trade cards and similar products.

Young Hogarth also took a lively interest in the street life of the metropolis and the London fairs, and amused himself by sketching the characters he saw. Around the same time, his father, who had opened an unsuccessful Latin-speaking coffee house at St John's Gate, was imprisoned for debt in Fleet Prison for five years. Hogarth never spoke of his father's imprisonment.

Hogarth became a member of the Rose and Crown Club, with Peter Tillemans, George Vertue, Michael Dahl, and other artists and connoisseurs.

By April 1720, Hogarth was an engraver in his own right, at first engraving coats of arms, shop bills, and designing plates for booksellers.

In 1727, he was hired by Joshua Morris, a tapestry worker, to prepare a design for the Element of Earth. Morris heard that he was "an engraver, and no painter", and consequently declined the work when completed. Hogarth accordingly sued him for the money in the Westminster Court, where the case was decided in his favour on 28 May 1728. In 1757 he was appointed Serjeant Painter to the King.

In 1731 Hogarth completed the earliest of his series of moral works, a body of work that led to significant recognition. The collection of six scenes was entitled A Harlot's Progress and appeared first as paintings (now lost) before being published as engravings. A Harlot's Progress depicts the fate of a country girl who begins prostituting – the six scenes are chronological, starting with a meeting with a bawd and ending with a funeral ceremony that follows the character's death from venereal disease.

The inaugural series was an immediate success and was followed in 1735 by the sequel A Rake's Progress. The second instalment consisted of eight pictures that depicted the reckless life of Tom Rakewell, the son of a rich merchant, who spends all of his money on luxurious living, services from prostitutes, and gambling – the character's life ultimately ends in Bethlem Royal Hospital. The original paintings of A Harlot's Progress were destroyed in the fire at Fonthill House in 1755; A Rake's Progress is displayed in the gallery room at Sir John Soane's Museum, London, UK.

When the success of A Harlot's Progress and A Rake's Progress resulted in numerous pirated reproductions by unscrupulous printsellers, Hogarth lobbied in parliament for greater legal control over the reproduction of his and other artists' work. The result was the Engravers’ Copyright Act (known as ‘Hogarth’s Act’), which became law on 25 June 1735 and was the first copyright law to deal with visual works as well as the first to recognize the authorial rights of an individual artist.

In 1743–1745, Hogarth painted the six pictures of Marriage à-la-mode (National Gallery, London), a pointed skewering of upper-class 18th-century society. This moralistic warning shows the miserable tragedy of an ill-considered marriage for money. This is regarded by many as his finest project and may be among his best-planned story serials.

Marital ethics were the topic of much debate in 18th-century Britain. The many marriages of convenience and their attendant unhappiness came in for particular criticism, with a variety of authors taking the view that love was a much sounder basis for marriage. Hogarth here painted a satire – a genre that by definition has a moral point to convey – of a conventional marriage within the English upper class. All the paintings were engraved and the series achieved wide circulation in print form. The series, which is set in a Classical interior, shows the story of the fashionable marriage of the son of bankrupt Earl Squanderfield to the daughter of a wealthy but miserly city merchant, starting with the signing of a marriage contract at the Earl's mansion and ending with the murder of the son by his wife's lover and the suicide of the daughter after her lover is hanged at Tyburn for murdering her husband.

Hogarth died in London on 26 October 1764 and was buried at St. Nicholas Church, Chiswick, London.
Source: Wikipedia
William Hogarth art
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Gordon Adam Hogg biography

Gordon Adam Hogg biography

Gordon Adam Hogg aka 'Gog' (1912 - 1971)
Gordon Hogg's first cartoon was published in the Daily Sketch in 1938. After the war he became chief editorial artist on the Daily Sketch and, using the pseudonym 'Gog', took over the 'Pop' cartoon strip for ten years when John Millar Watt retired in 1949. Very few of the original POP strips have survived.
Source: The Political Cartoon Gallery
Gordon Adam Hogg art
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Jim Holdaway biography

Jim Holdaway biography

Jim Holdaway (1927 - 1970; Barnes, UK)
Born in Barnes, London, Jim Holdaway became a freelance illustrator in 1950, working for publishers such as Odhams and Farrington Press. He worked on all types of artwork, adverts, cartoons, book illustrations and covers. His first full length stories were for Gallant Detective in 1952, and then went on to strips for Comic Cuts, and Swift. His first newspaper strip was Romeo Brown in the Daily Mirror. Sadly none of the original art for this strip has survived. This association with Peter O'Donnell led to the creation of Modesty Blaise which he drew from 1963 until his untimely death in 1970.
Jim Holdaway art

Some of the most regularly requested art has been Jim Holdaway's fabulous pen and ink artwork for Modesty Blaise, written by Peter O'Donnell. We also have signed original Modesty Blaise newspaper strips by JOHN M BURNS, NEVILLE COLVIN, ROMERO and PATRICK WRIGHT or click for all Modesty artwork in stock and not forgetting our highly collectable MODESTY BLAISE BOOKS.
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Fred Holmes biography

Fred Holmes biography

Frederick Thomas Holmes (1908 - 1994)
It is extraordinary the way certain artists take to the adventure picture strip as to the manner born. Fred Holmes was one of these. His first strip, Robin Hood of Sherwood was published in Sun in August 1953, (and reprinted in TCL 91) and gives all the appearance of work done by a long-established strip artist. For his very next strip, he was entrusted with creating a brand new character for the comics: Claude Duval. This strip began in September of 1953 for Comet and he made it his own.

Like all Associated Press's new adventure strip artists at this time, Fred was given artwork by Campion and Eyles to study before getting down to work. Both influences can be seen in his work, but Holmes had a style that was all his own, which he was able to adapt to suit not only period costume adventures but, later, football strips, taking over Roy of the Rovers for Tiger and the rather jokey Carson's Cubs for Lion; Western strips such as Billy the Kid for Sun and Buffalo Bill for Comet and several World War II battle stories for the various War Picture Libraries.

Fred has intimated that his initial break into illustrations came about because Drummonds of Stirling, Scotland, who were looking for an artist to illustrate their series of religious annuals for children, confused him with Frederick W. Holmes (no relation), a well-known illustrator of the time. If true, we can be grateful that such a mix-up occurred. We can also be grateful that this work came to an end after the War, prompting Fred to answer an advertisement put out by the Temple Art Agency looking for children's book illustrators. When Holmes realised it would mean working for comics, he was overjoyed. Starting by contributing spot illustrations to stories in Film Fun, Jingles and Tip Top, Holmes worked steadily for A.P. with occasional strip work for D.C. Thompson's Hotspur, Victor and Hornet in the late 60s until, shortly after the demise of Lion, he retired from comic work.

Fred Holmes was born in Lindsdale, Buckinghamshire, and took a postal course in illustration with the British and Dominions School of Drawing. Before the age of twenty, Holmes' drawings were appearing in such publications as the Meccano Magazine and the Co-op Magazine as well as in the pages of the Birmingham Weekly Post. Biography courtesy of David Ashford and Norman Wright.
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Richard Hook biography

Richard Hook biography

Richard Hook (1938 - January 2010; UK)
Richard Hook was born in 1938 and trained at Reigate College of Art. After national service with 1st Bn, Queen's Royal Regiment, he became art editor of the much-praised magazine Finding Out during the 1960s.

He then went on to work as a freelance illustrator, earning an international reputation for his deep knowledge of Native American material culture.

He provided many illustrations, predominantly scenes from British history and daily life, for Look and Learn magazine during the 1960s and 1970s and illustrated more than 50 titles for Osprey, contributing to these books for over 30 years. Sadly Richard passed away in January 2010.
Source: Osprey Publishing & The Illustration Art Gallery
Richard Hook art
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Ken Houghton biography

Ken Houghton biography

Ken Houghton (died ?1980s)
Ken Houghton was the artist for 'Lorna Doone', the last comic strip to appear in Look and Learn magazine before it's sad demise with issue 1049 (17 April 1982), and so this was his only comic strip work in Look and Learn.

The first episode of 'Lorna Doone' appeared in Look and Learn in issue 1003 (30 May 1981).

Ken Houghton ran a comic artist evening class in the late 1970s at a school where artist and illustrator Russ Nicholson taught Art & Design.

Ken introduced Russ to the world of comic strip illustration and Russ writes "He was a lovely patient man, a very good teacher, who died too young, and is missed by those who knew him. One of his other students at that time was a very young 16 year old called Sean Phillips who has since risen to be a well known comic artist working these days for for Icon, an imprint of Marvel Comics."

Other art identified as drawn by Ken Houghton includes the following:
An advert in comic strip form for The Green Cross Code (1972)
'Rat Pack' in Battle Picture Weekly (mid-late 1970s)
some complete stories in Tammy (mid-late 1970s)
Tansy of Jubilee Street in Jinty (10 May 1980+)
Bessie and Her Barrow in Tracey from Jan 1981
Detestable Dinah in Tracy from Dec 1981 - ?1982
The Secret of Penny Farthing (inks; art by Sean Phillips) in Bunty from June 1982 - Oct 1982
Judy Annual 1980 (inks)
Judy Annual 1984 featuring several strips illustrated by Ken Houghton including The Time Machine, Simple Simon (inks)

Although he shares his surname with another comic strip artist, Stanley Houghton (qv), they were apparently unrelated. It is thought that Ken Houghton died some time in the 1980s.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
Ken Houghton art
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Stanley Houghton biography

Stanley Houghton biography

Stanley Houghton; UK
Stanley Houghton was one of the comic artists who drew for the British comic magazine All Girl Comics in the 1950s. Girl was a sister publication to Eagle, published by Hulton Press from 1951 until 1960, taken over by Longacre and then by IPC Magazines before being subsumed by Princess in October 1964.

In the 1960s Houghton drew for Look and Learn magazine ('Rob Riley') and for the British girl's comic June, including the cleverly named comic strip 'Pony Tales'.

Some of the stories and comics were also collected in bound Girl Annual albums. Stanley Houghton drew 'Belle of the Ballet' (written by George Beardmore), among other stories.
Source: The Illustration Art Gallery & Lambiek Comiclopedia
Stanley Houghton art
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Margaret Maitland Howard biography

Margaret Maitland Howard biography

Margaret Maitland Howard (1898 - 1983; London, UK)
Margaret Maitland Howard was a painter, illustrator and draughtsman. Born in London, she studied at the Byam Shaw and Vicat Cole School of Art and Royal Academy Schools, where she was a multiple silver medal-winner.

She exhibited at the RA, NEAC, SWA, RP and ROI. Just after World War II she was appointed draughtsman to the Institute of Archaeology at London University. She was Ridley Art Club member and the daughter of the artist Henry James Howard. She lived in Sutton, Surrey.

Though a 20th Century artist her best work has a romantic neo-classical style reminiscent of the Pre-Raphaelites and late Victorian classicists.
Source: Babington Fine Art & Liss Lewellyn Fine Art
Margaret Maitland Howard art
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Norman Howard biography

Norman Howard biography

Norman Howard (1899 - 1955)
Painted a wide-range of illustrations for the Macmillan series of educational posters during the 1950s, ranging from a Pulp Mill to the American Declaration of Independence to Hannibal's Elephants crossing the Rhone.
Source: The Illustration Art Gallery
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Andrew Howat biography

Andrew Howat biography

Andrew Howat
Born in Hale, Cheshire, Howat studied life drawing, anatomy and painting at Manchester School of Art.

Andrew Howat has contributed a wide variety of work to Look and Learn. In the late 1970s, he was one of the key artists providing features on the rear cover, including the miscellaneous strip 'Strange Facts' and episodes of the 'Land of Legend' and 'Crowning Glory' series.

After his move to London he worked at a commercial studio before linking up with fellow artists Bob Robins and Gordon Davidson to produce illustrations for magazines and books. The trio often signed their work 'RDH'.

Howat later worked for various London advertising agencies as well as freelancing as a designer of greetings cards. He continues to design cards featuring landscapes and views of London as well as to paint landscapes in watercolour and pastel around London and Hertfordshire.

One of his paintings of the Palace of Westminster was used as a Christmas card by the House of Commons in 1999. He currently lives in north London.
Andrew Howat art
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Mike Hubbard biography

Mike Hubbard biography

Ernest Michael (?Alfred) Hubbard (2 April 1902 - 25 June 1976; Ireland)
Michael Hubbard was one of the most talented artists ever to draw for comics. Perhaps best known for taking over Jane from Norman Pett in the Daily Mirror, he drew superbly atmospheric illustrations for The Thriller in the 1930s, including some sensational covers. Mike also enjoyed drawing Jane Bond, Secret Agent for Tina in the late 1960s, the adventure Allan Quatermain for Ranger and the science fantasy story Pals for The Bumper Story Book for Boys.

As would be expected from the artist who drew "Jane", his delineation of the female form was second to none, equalled only by Heade. This talent was not exploited in the Thriller Comics Library as his only strip to appear in the series was Treasure Island (no.3) and that was not an original but adapted from the serial, which had appeared in Knockout some years previously. The only woman to appear in this was Jim Hawkins' mother!

His strip work for the comics can be seen to its best advantage in Ranger and Princess Tina in the 1960s where he not only drew but painted lavish versions of the classics, notably King Solomon's Mines and Coral Island (a version of which he had previously drawn for Knockout in 1946) for the former and The Secret Garden for the latter.

An unfinished version of Lorna Doone, perhaps also destined for Princess Tina, was probably the last work he produced before he died. The colour is radiantly jewel-like and atmospheric, and the drawing of exceptional quality, beautifully evoking the world of Blackmore's novel. Michael Hubbard was born and trained as an artist in Dublin before starting work in Dean's Studios. He was an excellent portrait painter and an expert on the history of architecture.
Source: David Ashford, Norman Wright, Illustration Art Gallery
Ernest Michael Hubbard art
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Frank Humphris biography

Frank Humphris biography

Frank Humphris (31 March 1911 - March 1993)
Frank Humphris studied at Gloucester College of Art, and worked as a painter and illustrator until the Second World War, when he served as a cartographer in the War Office. He ammassed a collection of vintage western gear and antique guns, and became a specialist in western comics.

In 1952, living in Teddington, Middlesex, he took over the Eagle's "Riders of the Range", which he drew until 1962. He later drew "The Devil's Henchmen" for the Eagle, and produced illustrations for other magazines. He created "Gun Lore" in Boy's World, then returned to Eagle to draw "Blackbow the Cheyenne". He left comics in the 1970s to concentrate on painting and writing.
Source: UK Comics Wiki
Frank Humphris art
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Geoff Hunt biography

Geoff Hunt biography

Geoff Hunt
Geoff Hunt is one of the leading marine artists of his generation. After formal art school training Geoff worked in marine publishing where he acquired a love of marine history. A Member of the Royal Society of Marine Artists since 1989, and a trustee since 1992, he was responsible for the RSMA's book A Celebration of Marine Art and The Tall Ship in Art. His work hangs in public and private collections around the world. There are 12 of his paintings in the Royal Naval museum in Portsmouth.
Geoff Hunt art
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Hermann Huppen biography

Hermann Huppen biography

Hermann Huppen (born 17 July 1938; Belgium)
Hermann Huppen is a Belgian comic book artist who is better known under his pen-name Hermann. He is most famous for his post-apocalyptic comic Jeremiah which was made into a television series.

Hermann was born in 1938 in Bévercé (now a part of Malmedy) in Liège Province. After studying to become a furniture maker and working as interior architect, Hermann made his debut as comic book artist in 1964 in the Franco-Belgian comics magazine Spirou with a four page story. Greg noticed his talent and offered him to work for his studio. In 1966, he began illustrating the Bernard Prince series written by Greg, published in Tintin magazine. In 1969, also in collaboration with Greg, he began the western series Comanche. This appeared at the same time as other western series such as Blueberry.

Hermann began writing his own stories in 1977, starting the post-apocalyptic Jeremiah series, which is still produced today. In the same period, he also made three albums of Nick, inspired by Little Nemo in Slumberland, for Spirou. In 1983 he began a new series, Les Tours de Bois-Maury, which is set in the Middle Ages and is less focused on action than his other works.

Hermann has also created many non-series graphic novels sometimes together with his son Yves H. One of them, Lune de Guerre, with a story by Jean Van Hamme, was later filmed as The Wedding Party by Dominique Deruddere.

Hermann is characterized by a realistic style and stories that are both somber and angry, with a sense of disillusion with regards to the human character in general, and current society more specifically.
Source: Wikipedia
Hermann Huppen art
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Gordon Hutchings biography

Gordon Hutchings biography

Gordon Hutchings
Gordon Hutchings took over the long-running Gulliver Guinea-Pig strip from Philip Mendoza around 1961 and his crisp charming work appeared in Playhour and later the Teddy Bear Annual.
Gordon Hutchings art
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Victor Ibanez biography

Victor Ibanez biography

Victor Ibáñez Sanchis (born 1938, Spain)
Victor Ibanez (Vicente Ibáñez Sanchis) was born in Valencia in 1938. He began his career as an apprenctice at Editoria Valenciana in 1954, contributing to collections like Comandos (1954) and later Yuki, el Temerario (1958) and Cuentos Gráficos Infantiles Cascabel (1958). By 1960 he was also present at Maga with contributions to Johnny Fogata (scripts by Pedro Quesada) and Muchachas. Work for Valenciana during this decade included Kid Tejano and El Sargento Virus. However, Ibáñez was mainly drawing action comics for the British market, among others for The Victor and Pow!.
Victor Ibanez art
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Graham Ingels biography

Graham Ingels biography

Graham J Ingels (7 June 1915 - 4 April 1991; Cincinatti, USA)
Graham J. Ingels was a comic book and magazine illustrator best known for his work in EC Comics during the 1950s, notably on The Haunt of Fear and Tales from the Crypt, horror titles written and edited by Al Feldstein, and The Vault of Horror, written and edited by Feldstein and Johnny Craig. Ingels' flair for horror led EC to promote him as Ghastly Graham Ingels, and he began signing his work "Ghastly" in 1952.

Born in Cincinnati, Ingels began working at age 14 after the death of his father, commercial artist Don Ingels, Graham was 16 when he entered the art field drawing theater displays. He studied at New York's Hawthorne School of Art.

Graham and Gertrude Ingels married when he was starting as a freelancer at age 20. He entered the U.S. Navy in 1943, and he began working that same year for Fiction House Publications, both in their pulp magazines and their comic book division. Black and white illustrations signed G. Ingels appeared in Planet Stories, Jungle Stories, North-West Romances and Wings. He contributed one painted cover to a 1944 issue of Planet Stories as well. For Planet Comics, he illustrated stories in the "Hunt Bowman" series and the "Aura, Lord of Jupiter" series. He also painted a mural at the United Nations building.

The Ingels had two children, Deanna (born 1937) and Robby (born 1946), who was named after a character - Robespierre - created by child impersonator Lenore Ledoux for the Baby Snooks radio program.

A regular in Planet Comics and Rangers Comics in the late 1940s, Ingels worked for Magazine Enterprises and other publishers of comic books and pulps. He became an art director at Better Publications (Ned Pine's Comics Group later known as Nedor), where he gave early comic book assignments to George Evans, with whom he would form a long friendship, and a young Frank Frazetta, who credited Ingels as the first in the business to recognize his talent. During this period, Ingels created covers and stories for the company's Startling Comics and Wonder Comics; these and other Better Publications comics reveal certain panels by other artists have been redrawn by Ingels to improve the artwork.

Ingels drew crime comics for Magazine Enterprises (Manhunt, Killers) and Westerns for a variety of companies, including Magazine Enterprises (Guns), Youthful Magazines (Gunsmoke), Hillman Periodicals (Western Fighters) and D.S. Publishing Co. (Outlaws). D.S. also published crime stories drawn by Ingels in Underworld, Gangsters Can't Win and Exposed. There were also short stories and one painted cover by Ingels in Dell Comics' Heroic Comics around 1947.

In 1948, Ingels was hired by Al Feldstein, the editor of EC Comics, to provide artwork for their titles which included Gunfighter, Saddle Justice, Saddle Romances, War Against Crime, Modern Love and A Moon, A Girl... Romance. The company's Western and romance comics were later canceled or converted to horror and science-fiction titles. In Grant Geissman's Foul Play, Feldstein explained that Ingels' early work for EC was disappointing, but publisher Bill Gaines was fiercely loyal to everybody, which is why Ingels remained at the company. When EC introduced Tales From the Crypt, The Vault of Horror and The Haunt of Fear, it soon became apparent to both Gaines and Feldstein that Ingels was an ideal choice as an illustrator of horror.

Ingels' unique and expressive style was well-suited for the atmospheric depiction of Gothic horrors amid crumbling Victorian mansions in hellish landscapes populated by twisted characters, grotesque creatures and living corpses with rotting flesh. A trademark image was a character with a thread of saliva visible in a horrified open mouth.

As the lead artist for The Haunt of Fear, he brought to life the Old Witch, horror host of "The Witch's Cauldron" lead story, and he also did the cover for each issue from issue 11 through 28. A prolific artist, Ingels also drew the Old Witch's appearances in Tales From the Crypt and The Vault of Horror, plus stories for Shock SuspenStories and Crime SuspenStories. The Old Witch's origin story was told in "A Little Stranger" (The Haunt of Fear #14).

Because of his many "Witch's Cauldron" stories, he was strongly identified with the character of the Old Witch, an association that continues until the present day. Ingels' artwork on the eight-page lead stories, and his splash pages, particularly on issues #14 and 17, set a new standard for horror illustration that have rarely been equaled. "Poetic Justice" in the 12th issue, was adapted for the 1972 Tales From the Crypt film from Amicus studios in England, with Peter Cushing as the kindly old junk collector, and Ingels' "Wish You Were Here" (The Haunt of Fear #22) was also adapted.

When EC cancelled its horror and crime comics, Ingels drew for EC's New Direction titles: Piracy, M.D., Impact and Valor. He later contributed to EC's short lived Picto-Fiction line.

After EC ceased publication in the mid-1950s, Ingels contributed to Classics Illustrated but otherwise found little work, as discussed by Nostrand in Foul Play: "He was kind of a sad case, because when the horror stuff went out, Graham went out with it. His forte was strictly doing horror comics, and there weren't any more horror comics being done".

Ingels took a teaching position with the Famous Artists correspondence school in Westport, Connecticut. He later left the Northeast and became an art instructor in Lantana, Florida, refusing to acknowledge his work in horror comics until a few years before he died. There's no question that Ingels' life changed dramatically once he settled in South Florida, thanks in great part to a girlfriend named Dorothy Bennett. An artistic soul in her own right, Bennett handled the day-to-day aspects of Ingels' teaching business, cherished his artistic talent and encouraged his various endeavors. The couple lived next door to each other for years and finally moved in together.

"Horror We? How's Bayou?" in The Haunt of Fear issue #17 is considered by many EC's best illustrated horror story ever and perhaps the best by anyone in any era. The homicidal maniac's creepy visage was taken from a vintage movie still of the 1920 silent film, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, starring John Barrymore. The art for this tale won an award as best EC horror art at the 1972 EC Fan-Addict Convention.

In 2004, the webcomic Is This Tomorrow? featured Ingels in its series of comic book trading cards.

Started in 2011, the Ghastly Awards adopted their name from Ingels's non-de-plume. The award, which honors excellence in horror comics, is presented annually. Ghastly Graham Ingels was, of course, the first Hall of Fame inductee.
Source: Wikipedia
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Ingres biography

Ingres biography

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (29 August 1780 - 14 January 1867; Montauban, France)
Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres was a French Neoclassical painter. Although he considered himself to be a painter of history in the tradition of Nicolas Poussin and Jacques-Louis David, by the end of his life it was Ingres's portraits, both painted and drawn, that were recognized as his greatest legacy.

A man profoundly respectful of the past, he assumed the role of a guardian of academic orthodoxy against the ascendant Romantic style represented by his nemesis, Eugène Delacroix. His exemplars, he once explained, were "the great masters which flourished in that century of glorious memory when Raphael set the eternal and incontestable bounds of the sublime in art ... I am thus a conservator of good doctrine, and not an innovator." Nevertheless, modern opinion has tended to regard Ingres and the other Neoclassicists of his era as embodying the Romantic spirit of his time, while his expressive distortions of form and space make him an important precursor of modern art.

Ingres was born in Montauban, Tarn-et-Garonne, France, the first of seven children (five of whom survived infancy) of Jean-Marie-Joseph Ingres (1755–1814) and his wife Anne Moulet (1758–1817). His father was a successful jack-of-all-trades in the arts, a painter of miniatures, sculptor, decorative stonemason, and amateur musician; his mother was the nearly illiterate daughter of a master wigmaker. From his father the young Ingres received early encouragement and instruction in drawing and music, and his first known drawing, a study after an antique cast, was made in 1789. Starting in 1786 he attended the local school École des Frères de l'Éducation Chrétienne, but his education was disrupted by the turmoil of the French Revolution, and the closing of the school in 1791 marked the end of his conventional education. The deficiency in his schooling would always remain for him a source of insecurity.

In 1791, Joseph Ingres took his son to Toulouse, where the young Jean-Auguste-Dominique was enrolled in the Académie Royale de Peinture, Sculpture et Architecture. There he studied under the sculptor Jean-Pierre Vigan, the landscape painter Jean Briant, and the neoclassical painter Guillaume-Joseph Roques. Roques' veneration of Raphael was a decisive influence on the young artist. Ingres won prizes in several disciplines, such as composition, "figure and antique", and life studies. His musical talent was developed under the tutelage of the violinist Lejeune, and from the ages of thirteen to sixteen he played second violin in the Orchestre du Capitole de Toulouse.

In March 1797, the Academy awarded Ingres first prize in drawing, and in August he traveled to Paris to study with Jacques-Louis David, France's—and Europe's—leading painter during the revolutionary period, in whose studio he remained for four years. Ingres followed his master's neoclassical example but revealed, according to David, "a tendency toward exaggeration in his studies." He was admitted to the Painting Department of the École des Beaux-Arts in October 1799, and won, after tying for second place in 1800, the Grand Prix de Rome in 1801 for his The Ambassadors of Agamemnon in the tent of Achilles. His trip to Rome, however, was postponed until 1806, when the financially strained government finally appropriated the travel funds.

Working in Paris alongside several other students of David in a studio provided by the state, he further developed a style that emphasized purity of contour. He found inspiration in the works of Raphael, in Etruscan vase paintings, and in the outline engravings of the English artist John Flaxman. In 1802 he made his debut at the Salon with Portrait of a Woman (the current whereabouts of which are unknown). The following year brought a prestigious commission, when Ingres was one of five artists selected (along with Jean-Baptiste Greuze, Robert Lefèvre, Charles Meynier, and Marie-Guillemine Benoist) to paint full-length portraits of Napoleon Bonaparte as First Consul. These were to be distributed to the prefectural towns of Liège, Antwerp, Dunkerque, Brussels, and Ghent, all of which were newly ceded to France in the 1801 Treaty of Lunéville. Napoleon is not known to have granted the artists a sitting, and Ingres's meticulously painted portrait of Bonaparte, First Consul appears to be modelled on an image of Napoleon painted by Antoine-Jean Gros in 1802.

In the summer of 1806 Ingres became engaged to Marie-Anne-Julie Forestier, a painter and musician, before leaving for Rome in September. Although he had hoped to stay in Paris long enough to witness the opening of that year's Salon, in which he was to display several works, he reluctantly left for Italy just days before the opening.

Ingres' stylistic eclecticism represented a new tendency in art. The Louvre, newly filled with booty seized by Napoleon in his campaigns in Italy and the Low Countries, provided French artists of the early 19th century with an unprecedented opportunity to study, compare, and copy masterworks from antiquity and from the entire history of European painting. As art historian Marjorie Cohn has written: "At the time, art history as a scholarly enquiry was brand-new. Artists and critics outdid each other in their attempts to identify, interpret, and exploit what they were just beginning to perceive as historical stylistic developments." From the beginning of his career, Ingres freely borrowed from earlier art, adopting the historical style appropriate to his subject, leading critics to charge him with plundering the past.

Newly arrived in Rome, Ingres read with mounting indignation the relentlessly negative press clippings sent to him from Paris by his friends. In letters to his prospective father-in-law, he expressed his outrage at the critics: "So the Salon is the scene of my disgrace; ... The scoundrels, they waited until I was away to assassinate my reputation ... I have never been so unhappy." He vowed never again to exhibit at the Salon, and his refusal to return to Paris led to the breaking up of his engagement. Julie Forestier, when asked years later why she had never married, responded, "When one has had the honor of being engaged to M. Ingres, one does not marry."

Ingres' portrait of fellow student Merry-Joseph Blondel in front of the Villa Medici in 1809
Installed in a studio on the grounds of the Villa Medici, Ingres continued his studies and, as required of every winner of the Prix, he sent works at regular intervals to Paris so his progress could be judged. As his envoi of 1808 Ingres sent Oedipus and the Sphinx and The Valpinçon Bather (both now in the Louvre), hoping by these two paintings to demonstrate his mastery of the male and female nude, but they were poorly received. In later years Ingres painted variants of both compositions; another nude begun in 1807, the Venus Anadyomene, remained in an unfinished state for decades, to be completed forty years later and finally exhibited in 1855.

He produced numerous portraits during this period: Madame Duvauçay, François-Marius Granet, Edme-François-Joseph Bochet, Madame Panckoucke, and that of Madame la Comtesse de Tournon, mother of the prefect of the department of the Tiber. In 1810 Ingres's pension at the Villa Medici ended, but he decided to stay in Rome and seek patronage from the French occupation government.

In 1811 Ingres finished his final student exercise, the immense Jupiter and Thetis, which was once again harshly judged in Paris. Ingres was stung; the public was indifferent, and the strict classicists among his fellow artists looked upon him as a renegade. Only Eugène Delacroix and other pupils of Pierre-Narcisse Guérin—the leaders of that romantic movement for which Ingres throughout his long life always expressed the deepest abhorrence—seem to have recognized his merits.

Although facing uncertain prospects, in 1813 Ingres married a young woman, Madeleine Chapelle, who had been recommended to him by her friends in Rome. After a courtship carried out through correspondence, he proposed to her without having met her, and she accepted. Their marriage was a happy one, and Madame Ingres acquired a faith in her husband which enabled her to combat with courage and patience the difficulties of their common existence. He continued to suffer the indignity of disparaging reviews, as Don Pedro of Toledo Kissing Henry IV's Sword, Raphael and the Fornarina (Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University), several portraits, and the Interior of the Sistine Chapel met a generally hostile critical response at the Paris Salon of 1814.

A few important commissions came to him. Notably, the French governor of Rome asked him to paint Virgil reading the Aeneid (1812) for his residence, and to paint two colossal works—Romulus's victory over Acron (1812) and The Dream of Ossian (1813)—for Monte Cavallo, a former Papal residence undergoing renovation to become Napoleon's Roman palace. These paintings epitomized, both in subject and scale, the type of painting with which Ingres was determined to make his reputation, but, as Philip Conisbee has written, "for all the high ideals that had been drummed into Ingres at the academies in Toulouse, Paris, and Rome, such commissions were exceptions to the rule, for in reality there was little demand for history paintings in the grand manner, even in the city of Raphael and Michelangelo."

Art collectors preferred "light-hearted mythologies, recognizable scenes of everyday life, landscapes, still lifes, or likenesses of men and women of their own class. This preference persisted throughout the nineteenth century, as academically oriented artists waited and hoped for the patronage of state or church to satisfy their more elevated ambitions."

Ingres traveled to Naples in the spring of 1814 to paint Queen Caroline Murat, and the Murat family ordered additional portraits as well as three modestly scaled works: The Betrothal of Raphael, La Grande Odalisque, and Paolo and Francesca. Apart from the Betrothal, however, he never received payment for these paintings, due to the collapse of the Murat regime in 1815. With the fall of Napoleon's dynasty, he found himself essentially stranded in Rome without patronage.

During this low point of his career, Ingres made his living by drawing pencil portraits of the many tourists, in particular the English, passing through postwar Rome. For an artist who aspired to a reputation as a history painter, this seemed menial work, and to the visitors who knocked on his door asking, "Is this where the man who draws the little portraits lives?", he would answer with irritation, "No, the man who lives here is a painter!". Nevertheless, the portrait drawings he produced in such profusion during this period are of outstanding quality, and rank today among his most admired works.

During this period, Ingres formed friendships with musicians including Paganini, and regularly played the violin with others who shared his enthusiasm for Mozart, Haydn, Gluck, and Beethoven. The works he sent to the 1819 Salon were La Grande Odalisque, Philip V and the Marshal of Berwick, and Roger Freeing Angelica, which were once again condemned as "gothic" by critics.

Ingres and his wife moved to Florence in 1820 at the urging of the Florentine sculptor Lorenzo Bartolini, an old friend from his years in Paris, who hoped that Ingres would improve his position materially, but Ingres, as before, had to rely on his drawings of tourists and diplomats for support. His friendship with Bartolini, whose worldly success in the intervening years stood in sharp contrast to Ingres's poverty, quickly became strained, and Ingres found new quarters. In 1821 he finished a painting commissioned by a childhood friend, Monsieur de Pastoret, the Entry of Charles V into Paris; de Pastoret also ordered a portrait of himself and a religious work (Virgin with the Blue Veil). The major undertaking of this period, however, was a commission obtained in August 1820 with the help of de Pastoret, to paint the Vow of Louis XIII for the Cathedral of Montauban. Recognizing this as an opportunity to establish himself as a painter of history, he spent four years bringing the large canvas to completion, and he travelled to Paris with it in October 1824.

The Vow of Louis XIII, exhibited at the Salon of 1824, finally brought Ingres critical success. Conceived in a Raphaelesque style relatively free of the archaisms for which he had been reproached in the past, it was admired even by strict Davidians. Ingres found himself celebrated throughout France; in January 1825 he was awarded the Cross of the Légion d'honneur by Charles X, and in June 1825 he was elected to the Institute. His fame was extended further in 1826 by the publication of Sudre's lithograph of La Grande Odalisque, which, having been scorned by artists and critics alike in 1819, now became widely popular.

A commission from the government called forth the monumental Apotheosis of Homer, which Ingres eagerly finished in a year's time. From 1826 to 1834 the studio of Ingres was thronged, and he was a recognized chef d'école who taught with authority and wisdom while working steadily. The critics came to regard Ingres as the standard-bearer of classicism against the romantic school —a role he relished. The paintings, primarily portraits, that he sent to the Salon in 1827 were well received.

Despite the considerable patronage he enjoyed under the Bourbon government, Ingres regarded the July Revolution of 1830 with enthusiasm. That the outcome of the Revolution was not a republic but a constitutional monarchy was satisfactory to the essentially conservative and pacifistic artist, who in a letter to a friend in August 1830 criticized agitators who "still want to soil and disturb the order and happiness of a freedom so gloriously, so divinely won." Ingres's career was little affected, and he continued to receive official commissions and honors under the July Monarchy.

One of only two works sent back to Paris during Ingres's six-year term as Director of the French Academy in Rome, the Stratonice was exhibited for several days in mid-August 1840 in the private apartment of the duc d'Orléans in the Pavilion Marsan of the Palais des Tuileries. While lampooned in Le Corsaire for its lofty subject matter yet extremely modest proportions (less than one metre across), overall the work was warmly received; so much so that on his return to Paris in June 1841, Ingres was received with all the deference that he felt was his due, including being received personally by King Louis-Philippe for a tour around Versailles. One of the first works executed after his return was a portrait of the duc d'Orléans, whose death in a carriage accident just weeks after the completion of the portrait sent the nation into mourning and led to orders for additional copies of the portrait.

Ingres shortly afterward began the decorations of the great hall in the Château de Dampierre. These murals, the Golden Age and the Iron Age, were begun in 1843 with an ardour which gradually slackened until Ingres, devastated by the loss of his wife on 27 July 1849, abandoned all hope of their completion and the contract with the Duc de Luynes was finally cancelled. A minor work, Jupiter and Antiope, dates from 1851; in July of that year he announced a gift of his artwork to his native city of Montauban, and in October he resigned as professor at the École des Beaux-Arts.

The following year Ingres, at seventy-one years of age, married forty-three-year-old Delphine Ramel, a relative of his friend Marcotte d'Argenteuil. This marriage proved as happy as his first, and in the decade that followed Ingres completed several significant works. A major undertaking was the Apotheosis of Napoleon I, painted in 1853 for the ceiling of a hall in the Hôtel de Ville, Paris, and destroyed by fire in the Commune of 1871. The portrait of Princesse Albert de Broglie was also completed in 1853, and Joan of Arc at the Coronation of Charles VII appeared in 1854. The latter was largely the work of assistants, whom Ingres often entrusted with the execution of backgrounds. In 1855 Ingres consented to rescind his resolution, more or less strictly kept since 1834, in favour of the International Exhibition, where a room was reserved for his works.

Napoléon Joseph Charles Paul Bonaparte, president of the jury, proposed an exceptional recompense for their author, and obtained from emperor Napoleon III Ingres's nomination as grand officer of the Légion d'honneur.

With renewed confidence Ingres now took up and completed The Source, a figure for which he had painted the torso in 1820; when it was seen with other works in London in 1862, admiration for his works was renewed, and he was given the title of senator by the imperial government.

The last of his important portrait paintings date from this period: Marie-Clothilde-Inés de Foucauld, Madame Moitessier, Seated (1856), Self-Portrait at the Age of Seventy-nine and Madame J.-A.-D. Ingres, née Delphine Ramel, both completed in 1859. The Turkish Bath, finished in a rectangular format in 1859, was revised in 1860 before being turned into a tondo. Ingres signed and dated it in 1862, although he made additional revisions in 1863.

Ingres died of pneumonia on 14 January 1867, at the age of eighty-six, having preserved his faculties to the last. He is interred in the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris with a tomb sculpted by his student Jean-Marie Bonnassieux. The contents of his studio, including a number of major paintings, over 4000 drawings, and his violin, were bequeathed by the artist to the city museum of Montauban, now known as the Musée Ingres.
Source: http://www.jeanaugustedominiqueingres.org/
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Peter Jackson biography

Peter Jackson biography

Peter Charles Geoffrey Jackson (born 1922, Brighton, UK)
Peter Jackson is a master of historical illustration, second to none in his ability to bring any period to life. His wonderful London Scrapbooks drawn for the Evening News from the 1940s onwards, some of which were collected in two memorable volumes, "London Explorer" and "London is Stranger Than Fiction", are legendary. Born in Brighton and trained at the Willesden School of Art in London, Jackson's first published work was an illustration for True Story in 1945.

In the late 1940s, he drew a series of adventure classics, one of which, Sir Walter Scott's Ivanhoe, was printed as Thriller Comics Library no. 29 with additional frames by Patrick Nicolle (taken from his 1952 Sun strip). Jackson is the first to dismiss this strip and it is certainly not in the same league as his version of Treasure Island, part of the same series, which was published in book form by Pitman, or any of the wonderful work he was to do later.

Never a prolific strip artist, much of his working life being taken up with historical reconstructions, etc., his work for Express Weekly, Swift, Mickey Mouse Weekly and Eagle confirm that he could have been a great asset to the Thriller Comics Library.  Biography courtesy of David Ashford and Norman Wright.
Peter Jackson art
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Sandy James biography

Sandy James biography

Sandy James (died ?2013)
Little is known about Sandy James, an iconic 1980s British comic artist whose work included:
Ring Raiders (Ring Raiders)
S.O.S. Special Operations Squad (Eagle)
Super Naturals (Super Naturals)
Timespell (Eagle)
The Battling Yorkshires (Look and Learn)
Johnny Cougar (Tiger)

Sandy also illustrated the majority of the covers and posters for M.A.S.K comic and also illustrated at least one story, possibly printed in issue 16. It is likely that Sandy illustrated himself as part of the Venom cover to issue 28 (the artist with the beard).
Source: The Illustration Art Gallery
Sandy James art
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Alex Jawdokimov biography

Alex Jawdokimov biography

Alex Jawdokimov; Smolensk, Russia
Born in Smolensk, Russia, Alex Jawdokimov has led a remarkable life. He was brought up on a kolhoz (collective farm), but spent many of his childhood years in various concentration camps across Europe.

He came to England in 1950 by way of Germany with his mother, who was a World War II refugee. He speaks Russian, German and English and became a naturalised British subject five years after arriving in the country. He was a student at the Somerset College of Art, Taunton.

In 1956 Alex Jawdokimov spent a brief spell in Canada, learning to fly with the RAF. He then settled in London in 1958 and formed a Russian Cossack Dance Company (his mother had been a professional dancer in Russia) which toured Britain. He also began to act, mostly in minor roles for television. Film parts then followed and he can count amongst his credits films including ‘Music Lovers', ‘The Tamarind Seed' and ‘The Eagle Has Landed'.

Despite his love of acting, Alex Jawdokimov's interest was still principally in painting and he exhibited alongside hundreds of other artists every weekend on the Hyde Park Railings in the Bayswater Road. He then worked in an advertising agency, afterwards becoming a freelance artist and illustrator, but he soon tired of the routine and commercial aspect of the work and began to devote more and more of his attention to his own style and methods of painting.

Film locations offered wonderful opportunities for on-the-spot sketching and the recording of various landscapes. As a result, Jawdokimov has painted many different areas of the British Isles and the Continent. He lives in North London with his family and his love of the city is exemplified in his many pieces of artwork depicting the famous landmarks and characters of the city where he has chosen to settle.

In 1969, after a short period a a commercial artist, he took the plunge and began painting seriously. He has developed his own style, using an acrylic base texture and lighting, finishing in oils for highlights and body colour.

Landscapes are his first love, but he has also become known for his Edwardian and Victorian London scenes. He has now developed a spectacular landscape style of birch forests using silver and gold leaf.

He has had showings in throughout the UK and Australia and San Francisco.
Source: http://www.artbol.com/painting-artist/alex-jawdokimov
Alex Jawdokimov art
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Phil Jimenez biography

Phil Jimenez biography

Phil Jimenez (born 12 July 1970; Los Angeles, USA)
Phil Jimenez is an American comic book artist and writer, known for his work as writer/artist on Wonder Woman from 2000 to 2003, as one of the five pencilers of the 2005-2006 miniseries Infinite Crisis, and his collaborations with writer Grant Morrison on New X-Men and The Invisibles.

Phil Jimenez was born and raised in Los Angeles and later Orange County, California. He moved to New York City to attend college at the School of Visual Arts, where he majored in cartooning. He graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in 1991.

After graduating from SVA, Jimenez was hired by DC Comics Creative Director Neal Pozner at age 21, with his first published work illustrating four pages in the 1991 miniseries War of the Gods.<Actinic:Variable Name = '6'/> Pozner was HIV-positive when he and Jimenez started dating, and was hesitant about dating someone younger and HIV-negative. Nonetheless, Jimenez became both Pozner's partner and caretaker, saying:

"Neal Pozner was my first editor, and he was probably my greatest mentor at DC Comics. He was an incredibly talented man, with some very strong opinions about the way things should be done. I developed a crush on him the minute I met him, and I wanted to know more about him, and I wanted to be with him all the time. So I'd hang out with him at work, in the offices, far later than I had any reason to. I would buy clothes I couldn't afford to impress him. And eventually, I mustered the nerve to ask him on a date. And he was 15 years older than I was. And he had been my boss. And so, against his better judgement, he said yes. And it actually ended up being a really wonderful relationship.

Following Neal Pozner's death in 1994, Jimenez wrote and illustrated the 1996 DC miniseries, Tempest, based on a character from Pozner's late-1980s Aquaman series. In the last issue, Jimenez dedicated the miniseries to Pozner, and wrote an editorial page in which he came out publicly for the first time. "It got over 150 letters," he says, "including the classic letter from the kid in Iowa: 'I didn't know there was anyone else like me.' That's what counts. It meant a lot to people."

Much of Jimenez's work is related to works by George Pérez, whose art strongly influenced Jimenez. Jimenez has worked on several Teen Titans-related series (some issues of the ongoing series New Titans and Team Titans, and the miniseries JLA/Titans, The Return of Donna Troy and Tempest), was the main artist of Infinite Crisis, a sequel to Crisis on Infinite Earths, and did a long run as writer/artist of Wonder Woman beginning with issue #164 (Jan. 2001). (Perez had worked on the series in the late 1980s to early 1990s). Perez and Jimenez would also co-write a 2-part story together in Wonder Woman (Vol. 2) issues #168-169 in 2001. Jimenez would leave as series writer/artist with issue #188 in March 2003. Jimenez and Pérez also have worked together in 2005-2006 in the miniseries Infinite Crisis (where Jimenez was the main penciller, and Pérez drew some sequences and covers for the series) and DC Special: The Return of Donna Troy (written by Jimenez and inked by Pérez).

Jimenez is also known for his work on various titles for DC Entertainment's "mature readers" imprint, Vertigo, including Swamp Thing, The Invisibles with acclaimed writer Grant Morrison, and his own creator-owned series, the sci-fi/fantasy mashup Otherworld. In 2003, Jimenez drew several story arcs of Morrison's popular New X-Men run.

It was announced at the 2007 San Diego ComicCon that Jimenez had signed an exclusive contract with Marvel Comics. He was one of the four artists working on Marvel's flagship title, The Amazing Spider-Man, the company's sole Spider-Man title, in which Marvel upped its frequency of publication to three issues monthly, and inaugurated the series with the "back to basics" story arc "Brand New Day" at the beginning of 2008. His first work on Spider-Man was in the Free Comic Book Day 2007: Spider-Man #1 (June 2007) comic book, with writer Dan Slott, which served as a prelude to "Brand New Day". During his run, Jimenez drew the cover for The Amazing Spider-Man #583, featuring Barack Obama.

He appeared at the White House for the National Design Awards to present original art to First Lady Michelle Obama.

In 2009 Marvel Editor-in-Chief Joe Quesada announced that Jimenez would take over the art chores on Astonishing X-Men beginning with Issue #31. In 2010 Jimenez co-wrote the book The Essential Wonder Woman Encyclopedia with John Wells for Del Rey Books. He later returned to DC Comics, illustrating a brief stint on Adventure Comics featuring the Legion of Super-Heroes, and Fairest, a spin-off of Bill Willingham's book Fables.

Jimenez appeared in a panel discussion on diversity in sci-fi/fantasy fandom in March 19, 2015 episode of the Comedy Central humor and commentary program The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore, along with Marvel Comics' director of content and character Sana Amanat, hip-hop artist Jean Grae and comedian Mike Lawrence. During the discussion, Jimenez commented, "It feels strange to me that we would partition race, gender and nerd as if they were distinct things...All human beings are this combination of experiences and ideologies...Everybody's get some nerd in them. But the idea that, somehow, being a nerd is separate from one’s religious or moral or political beliefs is strange to me. We all bring everything to our decision-making on a daily basis."

Jimenez supervising a June 12, 2011 figure drawing class at the LGBT Center in Manhattan.
Jimenez teaches a life drawing course as part of the undergraduate cartooning program at the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan, where he himself once studied. He has also held figure drawing classes outside of SVA, at places such as the LGBT Center in the West Village.

Jimenez provided sketches seen in the 2002 superhero film Spider-Man. In scenes in which Peter Parker, played by Tobey Maguire, is seen creating sketches of his costume, the close-ups of his hands are actually those of Jimenez.

Jimenez created art for the first permanent AIDS awareness exhibit at the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry and his art has appeared on album covers, and in editorial magazines. His artwork has been featured in mainstream publications such as TV Guide, and he himself has been profiled or recognized in Entertainment Weekly, The Advocate, Instinct magazine and Out magazine.
Source: Wikipedia
Phil Jimenez art
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JOB (Jacques Marie Gaston Onfroy de Bréville) biography

JOB (Jacques Marie Gaston Onfroy de Bréville) (25 November 1858 - 15 September 1931; France)
Jacques Marie Gaston Onfroy de Bréville, known by the pen name Job after his initials (25 November 1858, Bar-le-Duc – 15 September 1931, Neuilly-sur-Seine) was a French artist and illustrator.

His father opposed his entry to thé École des beaux-arts after graduating from the Collège Stanislas. He therefore joined the French army, but returned to Paris in 1882. In the intervening period, he maintained a keen taste for military, patriotic and nationalistic subjects. He finally joined the École des beaux-arts and exhibited at the 1886 'Salon des artistes français', receiving a mixed reception. He therefore began a career as an illustrator, contributing caricatures to La Caricature and to La Lune.

However, he is best known for his illustrations for children's books, most frequently for texts by Georges Montorgueil. His major colour compositions contributed to the cult of 'heroes of the nation' such as Napoleon I and Joachim Murat. Several of his illustrations appear in La Vieille Garde impériale (The Old Imperial Guard), published in 1932 by Alfred Mame and fils de Tours. His eye for detail can be seen in L'Épopée du costume militaire français - even in works intended for children, he tried to reproduce uniforms with extreme precision.

His best known works are Murat, Le Grand Napoléon des petits enfants, Jouons à l'histoire, Louis XI, Napoléon, Bonaparte and Les Gourmandises de Charlotte. He also illustrated the life of George Washington and was well known in the USA. He was a Sociétaire of the 'humoristes' and exhibited with the Incoherents. His studio has been reconstructed at the musée de Metz.
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Ron Jobson biography

Ron Jobson biography

Ron Jobson
Ron is a well-known illustrator and the creator of many of the propaganda posters during the Second World War. In 1967 he was responsible for the illustrations on all of the Matchbox 1-75 Series model boxes for that year.
Ron has also produced illustrations for Airfix model boxes and for many books on aircraft and spacecraft.
Ron Jobson art
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Michael Johnson biography

Michael Johnson biography

Michael Johnson (born 1940s; Thirsk, UK)
Studied Painting and Sculpture at York School of Art, England. Spent his early years as freelance, and worked mainly on artworks for magazines, advertising and book illustration in England and the rest of Europe. An accomplished and adaptable book and magazine illustrator with bags of experience.

Magazine illustrations include: Sunday Times, Telegraph, Observer, Woman's Own, Mirror, Harpers & Queen, Motor, Good Housekeeping, Nova, Penthouse, Stern, Bunte, Constance, Swensk Damtid Ning.

Worked for Advertising Agencies and Design Groups in London, Dusseldorf, Hamburg, Frankfurt, Stockholm, Oslo, Brussels, Amsterdam, Milan, Paris, Lyon, Marseille and Nice.

Worked with many publishers including Penguin, Pan, Granada, Collins, Fontana, Panther, TransWorld, Dragons World, Arrow, Hamish Hamilton, Readers Digest, Dorling Kindersly

Late 1960s and Early 1970s: Contract with German advertising agency (H.B.U. Dusseldorf) as consultant Art Director and Illustrator, working on experimental three dimensional artworks used in market research.

Paintings published as prints by Paul Hamlin, Frost and Reed (England) and Scandecor (Sweden), a series of five girls' heads in the Top Ten best selling list (1980s).

Exhibited with the "Quichua" painters group in Provence (landscapes and nudes). Worked on publicity material for Bernardo Bertolucci, Stephen Spielberg, Walt Disney Productions.

Portrait Commissions include: H.R.H. The Prince of Wales, Aristotle Onassis, Al Capone, President Kennedy, Sir Lew Grade, Barry Norman, Sybilla Edmondstone, various fashion models.

Over the years has had seven books published:
Angela's Rainbow (Dragons World, 1983) : A story of beautiful girls journeying through time and space, based on the Sakti Shiva story in Indian mythology.
Paper Gliders 1 and 2: Two books of paper gliders to make and fly designed by the author.
Paper Planes 1 and 2: Two books of classic aeroplanes to be made up into flying scale models.
Flying Dinosaurs: Flying scale models of pterodactyls.
Birds of Provence (Barthelemy 2000) guide book.

Worked on specialized architectural illustrations for various developments in the South of France, one in Saudi Arabia. This, in turn have led to commissions (Aerial views) of private houses and gardens.

Commissioned to produce large undersea paintings showing sunken ships, also several large aircraft paintings of corporate jets flying over specific landscapes.

Worked with Sir Norman Foster on a book entitled "Aeroplane" (following a similar concept as the book produced by Le Corbusier in 1925), tracing the history of man's early attempts to fly, through to the most advanced developments of today.

In 2001, conceived and designed a book based on the Japanese "Shunga" books (erotic art) of the 17th century, 25 drawings and 50 sketches were produced.

In 2002 – 2005, conceived and illustrated a fantasy book and film scenario, based on the 11th century journey of Berengaria (later the wife of Richard the Lion Heart) from Provence to the south of Spain.
Source: Michael Johnson website
Michael Johnson art

See illustrators issue 4 for a Michael Johnson feature article.
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Bruce Jones biography

Bruce Jones biography

Bruce Jones, USA)
Bruce Jones started out as an artist in New York in the 1970s, selling illustrations to science fiction magazines, comic books, fanzines and men's magazines. In the mid-1970s Jones turned to writing for the Warren magazines.

Since the 1980s, he has worked for numerous comics like Alien Worlds, Batman, Conan the Barbarian, Incredible Hulk, Vampirella and Weird War Tales. He has also let loose his unusual imagination in his own comic Twisted Tales.
Bruce Jones art
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Chuck Jones biography

Chuck Jones biography

Charles Martin "Chuck" Jones (1912 - 2002, USA)
"Chuck" Jones was an American animator, cartoon artist, screenwriter, producer, and director of animated films, most memorably of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts for the Warner Bros. Cartoons studio.

He directed many of the classic short animated cartoons starring Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote, Sylvester, Pepé Le Pew and the other Warners characters, including Duck Amuck, One Froggy Evening and What's Opera, Doc? (all three of which were later inducted into the National Film Registry) and Jones' famous "Hunting Trilogy" of Rabbit Fire, Rabbit Seasoning, and Duck! Rabbit! Duck! (1951-1953).

After his career at Warner Bros. ended in 1962, Jones started Sib Tower 12 Productions and began producing cartoons for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, including a new series of Tom and Jerry shorts and the television adaptation of Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas!.

He later started his own studio, Chuck Jones Productions, which created several one-shot specials, and periodically worked on Looney Tunes related works.
Chuck Jones art
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Jeffrey Jones biography

Jeffrey Jones biography

Jeffrey (Jeff) Jones (born 1944, USA)
Born in Atlanta Georgia, Jeff studied geology in college before moving to New York in 1967 where he became an illustrator. In 1971 he created the strip called Idyll for National Lampoon magazine. His early comic included work for Charlton and DC, but his vocation is painting. He has illustrated many paperback covers for Ace and Bantam including many Robert E Howard works.

In 1976, along with Barry Windsor Smith, Mike Kaluta and Berni Wrightson, he founded The Studio, where he produced a number of high quality extremely limited edition prints. His black and white strip I'm Age appeared in Heavy Metal magazine. He continues to paint and has had several major exhibitions in America.

See also our JEFFREY JONES BOOKS.
Jeffrey Jones art
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Sydney Jordan biography

Sydney Jordan biography

Sydney Jordan
Scottish artist Sydney Jordan was initially drawn towards a career in flying and studied at the Miles Aircraft Technical College in Reading. Unable to find a job, he joined a small artists' studio in Dundee, his place of birth.

He assisted Len Fullerton on his comic Dora, Toni and Liz and came up with a new science-fiction character, Orion. In 1952, he moved to London and started working for the agency Man's World.

Here, he came up with Dick Hercules, and submitted his Orion character to the Daily Express, who advised him to make his hero an RAF pilot: Jeff Hawke was born.

After the first few aircraft episodes, Jeff Hawke took off into space and became a popular feature of the Daily Express. Sydney Jordan and his friend Willy Patterson, who wrote the scenarios, devoted themselves to this series, which appeared until 1974 and was translated and published in countries all over Europe.
Sydney Jordan art
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Joe Jusko biography

Joe Jusko biography

Joe Jusko (born 1 September 1959; born New York, USA)
Joe Jusko is an American artist known for his realistic, highly detailed painted fantasy, pin-up, and cover illustrations, mainly in the comic book industry. Jusko painted the 1992 Marvel Masterpieces trading cards, the popularity of which has been credited with initiating the painted trading card boom of the 1990s.

Growing up in New York, Jusko attended the High School of Art and Design, where his instructors included Bernard Krigstein. He graduated in 1977 with the DC Comics Award of Excellence in Cartooning.

After graduating, Jusko worked as an assistant for five months for Howard Chaykin, which led to Jusko selling his first cover for Heavy Metal magazine at the age of 18. Forgoing college, Jusko went straight into the commercial illustration world.

During his career, Jusko has worked for almost every major comic book publisher, producing hundreds of images for both covers and interiors. In addition to his long stint as one of the main cover artists for The Savage Sword of Conan, Jusko has painted every major character that Marvel Comics has created, most notably the Hulk and the Punisher.

Jusko has also produced covers and interior art for many other comics companies and characters, including DC Comics, Crusade Comics, Innovation Comics, Harris Comics, Wildstorm Comics, Top Cow Productions, and Byron Preiss Visual Publications.

Besides the 1992 Marvel Masterpieces trading card set, Jusko painted the 1995 Art of Edgar Rice Burroughs trading cards. His work is featured in the 1996 card set Fleer's Ultra X-Men Wolverine Cards, as well as Conan the Barbarian and Vampirella trading card sets.

Jusko has also produced storyboards for ad agencies, for such notable clients as the World Wrestling Federation.

Jusko produced the collection, The Art of Joe Jusko (Desperado Publishing, 2009), as well as a graphic novel adaptation of Steve Niles's supernatural detective Cal MacDonald.

At one point in his career, Jusko became "disillusioned with the lack of work . . . and became a [New York City] police officer. After several years I realized art was my main passion and went back to it full time. Luckily, the second time was a charm and my career took off." After the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, Jusko created the Police and Firefighter Heroes of September 11 lithograph, all proceeds of which went to the New York City Police and Fire Department Widows' and Orphans' Fund.

Jusko won the Comics Buyer's Guide Fan Award for Favorite Painter in 1992 and 1993, and the Wizard Fan Award for Favorite Painter in 1993 and 1994. His fully painted graphic novel Tomb Raider: The Greatest Treasure of All won a Certificate of Merit from the Society of Illustrators (which accepted Jusko as a member in 2007).
Source: Wikipedia
Joe Jusko art
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Michael Kaluta biography

Michael Kaluta biography

Michael Kaluta (born 1947, USA)
Born in Guatemala (of U.S. Citizens), he has been influenced by Al Williamson, Frank Frazetta, and Maxfield Parrish, amongst others. He began his comics work in the 1970s for DC and it was during this time that he first illustrated The Shadow. In the late 1970s he joined with Barry Windsor Smith, Bernie Wrightson and Jeff Jones at The Studio where he produced a series of limited edition prints and photoprints. In the 1980s he produced a a number of book covers and record sleeves, and in 1985 illustrated Elaine Lee's SF satirical play/graphic novel Starstruck. More recently he has returned to painting covers for the new Shadow and Tarzan comic books for DC and Edgar Rice Burroughs' Minidoka book for Dark Horse. Michael has also illustrated covers for DC's new Aquaman (issues 64-75).
Michael Kaluta art
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Jack Kamen biography

Jack Kamen biography

Jack Kamen (29 May 1920 - 5 August 2008; Brooklyn, New York, USA)
Jack Kamen was an American illustrator for books, magazines, comic books and advertising, known for his work illustrating crime, horror, humor, suspense and science fiction stories for EC Comics, for his work in advertising, and for the onscreen artwork he contributed to the 1982 horror anthology film Creepshow.

Kamen's first professional job was as an assistant to a sculptor working for the Texas Centennial. He studied sculpture with Agop Agopoff and was a student of Harvey Dunn, George Brandt Bridgman and William C. McNulty. When Kamen attended classes at the Art Students League and the Grand Central Art School, he paid for his studies by painting theatrical scenery, decorating fashion mannequins and creating sculptures. Shortly after he began his illustration career with Western and detective pulp magazines, he was called into the Army in 1942. After World War II, he started drawing comic book stories for Fiction House and the Eisner & Iger studio.

Artist Al Feldstein also did work for the Eisner & Iger studio, where Kamen and Feldstein became friends. Later, Feldstein brought Kamen into EC Comics, as Kamen recalled in an interview with Ken Smith:
He called me up, and I went in and met the both of them. Al was there. Bill said, 'This boy wonder of mine is recommending you for this work.' I was delighted, because Bill Gaines was always Bill Gaines, and Al was my friend. So I got the work. I was glad to get it. And then, as the popularity increased, Bill one day said, “Look, I don’t know what you’re getting, but I’ll meet anybody’s price and I’ll keep you busy all of the time. How would you like to be exclusive?” And I said I’d love it!

After initially getting EC assignments to illustrate romance comics, he soon became one of the most prolific EC artists, drawing crime, horror, humor, suspense and science fiction stories. He was known for his drawings of attractive women. Describing Kamen's understated style, EC editor Al Feldstein said, "We gave Kamen those stories where the All-American girl and guy are married and then chop each other to pieces." In Tales from the Crypt #31, Kamen drew a semi-autobiographical self-satire, "Kamen's Kalamity", later adapted to HBO's Tales from the Crypt TV series as "Korman's Kalamity". The story depicted the transition from romance to horror by Kamen, who called it "my favorite story".

After EC's line of comics fell victim to industry censorship in 1954–55, it was Kamen who suggested to the publisher that the company could avoid the newly imposed Comics Code Authority strictures with a pricier magazine format, which Kamen dubbed Picto-Fiction. However, EC's woes followed the new line of Picto-Fiction titles, including those with stories by Kamen. The magazines were underdistributed and soon canceled.

After leaving EC, Kamen began drawing Sunday supplement illustrations and creating advertising art for a wide variety of clients: Esquire Shoe Polish, Mack Trucks, Pan American Airlines, Playtex, RCA, Smith Corona and Sylvania. For artist Tom Palmer, Kamen described one of his unusual painting techniques:
Did you know I used Prismacolor pencils along with an acrylic paint wash to create my paintings? I would use a smooth illustration board and apply my basic color in a very watery wash of acrylic, and after it dried I would start rendering with Prismacolor pencil. Then I would take an electric eraser, with a particular eraser, that when you erased anything, before you got down to removing color, you could mix the color pencil very, very smooth, almost like an oil painting.

He also drew all the comic book artwork for Stephen King and George A. Romero's 1982 horror anthology film Creepshow, King and Romero's homage to the EC horror comics. Although the bulk of the artwork for the graphic novel adaptation of the film was done by acclaimed macabre artist Berni Wrightson (along with his daughter who did some of the coloring), Kamen illustrated the cover.

Jack Kamen married his wife, Evelyn in 1946. They had four children. Jack Kamen died at his home in Boca Raton on August 5, 2008 from causes related to cancer.
Source: Wikipedia
Jack Kamen art
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Peter Kay biography

Peter Kay biography

Peter Kay
Peter Kay was an artist who worked for Girl - the female counterpart of Eagle magazine - in the 1950s and 60s, drawing strips such as "Susan of St. Brides" and "Lindy Love", both written by Ruth Adam.

He also drew covers for Mandy, June, Princess Picture Library and Schoolgirls' Picture Library.
Source: UK Comics Wiki
Peter Kay art
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Ted Kearon biography

Ted Kearon biography

Ted Kearon
Ted Kearon was the artist of the robot 'Archie' and one of the main artists of the magazine Lion in the 1950s. The 'Archie' comic was created by Kearon and writer George Cowan under the title 'The Jungle Robot' in Lion in 1952. It then disappeared for four years, and returned in 1957, this time under the title 'Archie the Robot'. The new version ran for 17 years, until Lion stopped publication in 1974.

From the early 1960s, the comic also appeared in the Dutch weekly Sjors, where it was soon continued by the artist Bert Bus. For Lion, Kearon has also illustrated other series, including 'Castaways of Typhoon Island', 'The Day the World Drowned' and 'Steel Commando'. He additionally drew 'Morgyn the Mighty' strips for The Victor.

Ted Kearon was one of the most prolific of the artists who worked for Lion in the 1950s. Together with scriptwriter George Cowan, he created the famous character of robot Archie for this magazine in 1952. In the over 20-year history of the comic ‘Robot Archie’ (originally known as ‘The Jungle Robot’, then ‘Archie The Robot Explorer’, and finally ‘Robot Archie’), Archie, at first a mute robot, got his voice and acquired a unique, often boastful personality. The development of the comic over time was also apparent in terms of content. If in accordance with the first title, the early adventures took place in the jungles of Africa and South America, more and more science fiction elements were added later. Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
Ted Kearon art
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Jack Keay biography

Jack Keay biography

Jack "John" Edwin Keay (10 May 1907 - 1999; King's Norton, UK)
Artist who contributed a variety of illustrations and covers to Look and Learn. When he signed his work, it was usually as “Jack Keay”. Jack Keay was born in King’s Norton, Worcestershire, on 10 May 1907. Little is known about Keay’s career, but he was a popular book cover artist who worked for Pan, Panther, Hutchinson, Fontana and Four Square in the 1957-62 period.

Keay illustrated a number of books in the 1970s and 1980s, including The Change of Life by Muriel E. Landau (1971), Gunfighters of the Wild West by Eric Inglefield (1978), American Civil War by Philip Clark (1988), American War of Independence by Philip Clark (1988) and Viking Explorers by Rupert Matthews (1989). He died in Hounslow, London, in 1999, aged 92.

Jack Keay is not to be mistaken for John R. Keay (qv) who also contributed to Look and Learn. Source: Look and Learn
Jack Keay art
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John Keay biography

John Keay biography

John R Keay; UK
Artist who contributed to the ‘This Made Headlines’ and ‘Dateline’ series which appeared on the inside front cover of Look and Learn in the late 1970s.

Keay had a highly distinctive style, achieving an unusual smoothness of texture in his illustrations, both in colour and black and white. He usually signed his pictures “Keay”. Keay was represented by John Martin & Artists and also illustrated books, including Kings of Israel by David Kent (1981).

John Keay is not to be mistaken for Jack Keay (qv) who also contributed to Look and Learn. Source: Look and Learn
John Keay art
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Selby Kelly biography

Selby Kelly biography

Selby Daley Kelly (13 August 1917 - June 2005; USA)
Selby Kelly was the third wife and widow of 'Pogo' artist Walt Kelly. Born in Boulder, Colorado, she eventually settled in Los Angeles, where she pursued a long career in animation. She worked for the Disney studios from 1930 until the strike of 1941.

In the following years, she worked for some of the major Hollywood studios, such as MGM, Walter Lantz and Warner Bros. In the 1960s, she worked for Hanna-Barbera. She cooperated on a television special about 'Pogo' in 1969, and this is when Walt and Selby fell in love.

She became his third wife and he became her second husband but, sadly, they only had a few years together. Kelly died in 1973 and Selby, who had been helping him with his work during his illness, continued the 'Pogo' strip for almost two years with the aid of Stephen Kelly, Don Morgan, letterer Henry Shikuma and several other hands. Afterwards, she supervised many other 'Pogo' projects, such as reprints, merchandise and other related products.
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
Selby Kelly art
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A E Kennedy biography

A E Kennedy biography

Albert Ernest Kennedy (1883 - 1963; active 1930s - 1950s)
A E Kennedy was an illustrator of children's books mostly about animals. His clever and expressive illustrations, slightly cute, are still collected today. He was the elder brother of noted flower painter Cecil Kennedy and was one of the few illustrators of whom Alison Uttley approved both for his work and his personality.

As well as fairytales and humorous series of playing cards, amongst many other books he also illustrated were most of the Alison Uttley 'Sam Pig' and 'Tim Rabbit' stories.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
A E Kennedy art
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Ian Kennedy biography

Ian Kennedy biography

(Charles) Ian Kennedy (born 1932, Scotland)
Best known as a superb cover artist for DC Thomson - most of the Thomson adventure annual covers of the '80s were by him as are, to this day, all the best Commando Library covers - Ian Kennedy also drew many strips for the Amalgamated Press in the '50s and was the best of the new Dan Dare artists in IPC's New Eagle. He is extremely versatile and, as well as being a thoroughly convincing War artist in his many Battler Britton stories, he drew excellent Western strips. He drew Billy the Kid for Sun and Hopalong Cassidy and Davy Crockett for Knockout, the latter being of particular interest for its authenticity as well as for its backwoods humour.

Ian Kennedy was born in Dundee, Scotland, and, on leaving school, worked for five years in DC Thomson's Art Department which he said was the best training an apprentice comic artist could possibly wish for. Biography courtesy of David Ashford and Norman Wright.

See also the complete Eagles Over The Western Front stories collected in three volumes.
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Eric Kincaid biography

Eric Kincaid biography

Eric Kincaid (born 1931; London, UK)
Eric Kincaid ARMS became captivated by illustrations in books on his 8th birthday when he was given a book about Robin Hood, illustrated by H.M.Brock. ‘I can remember lying on my stomach on the living room floor, engrossed in the story, when I turned a page and saw Brock’s black and white illustration depicting the death of Robin. The emotion came through to me from the printed page. I was deeply moved and knew that this was what I wanted to do with my life’.

Born in London in 1931, Eric studied illustration and design at Gravesend School of Art where Peter Blake was a contemporary and Quentin Crisp one of the life models. After two years national service and then working in advertising Eric became a comic strip artist where he drew the last Dan Dare story for the Eagle.

In 1971 Eric was offered the chance to fulfill his real ambition to illustrate children’s books when the publishing company, Brimax Books asked him to illustrate a book of Nursery Rhymes. There followed a long and successful relationship with Brimax who commissioned over 100 books from Eric over the next 30 years. These included Wind in the Willows, Peter Pan, The Jungle Book, Oliver Twist, Alice in Wonderland, Aesop’s Fables and anthologies of poetry and nursery rhymes. Eric went on regular book signing tours of America and Canada and regularly attended the Frankfurt Book Fair. His titles have appeared in 14 languages and world-wide sales exceed 8 million copies.

Eric now lives in Dorset where he settled in 1990 and has now asked Towngate Publications to handle the printing and promotion of his limited edition prints. He has also asked the Towngate Gallery to exhibit his full range of original Jungle Book paintings with a view to promoting his prints and sale of his originals to keen collectors.
Source: http://www.erickincaid.com/
Eric Kincaid art
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Jack Kirby biography

Jack Kirby biography

Jack Kirby (1917 - 1994, USA)
One of the fathers of the comic book, there is hardly an artist in comics today who has not been directly or indirectly influenced by Kirby. In his early career he worked at the Fleischer animation studios, and in the 1940s teamed with Joe Simon to create many different super-hero teams and characters.

Among these were Captain America for Timely, Stuntman and Boy Explorers for Harvey. In the 1960s he worked with Stan Lee on Fantastic Four, Thor, Captain America, and The Avengers, etc, and he was the major factor that made Marvel a household name in comics.
Jack Kirby art

See also our JACK KIRBY BOOKS.
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Josh Kirby biography

Josh Kirby biography

Ronald William "Josh" Kirby (27 November 1928 – 23 October 2001; Liverpool, UK)
Josh Kirby was an English commercial artist born in Waterloo, on the outskirts of Liverpool, Merseyside.

Josh Kirby was educated at the Liverpool City School of Art, where he acquired the nickname Josh, which comes from having his work compared to that of Sir Joshua Reynolds. The nickname stuck and Kirby was rarely called by his real name later. He died unexpectedly, of natural causes, in his sleep at home in Shelfanger near Diss in Norfolk at the age of 72. He was painting a new addition to his Magnum Opus, the Voyage of the Ayeguy portfolio before he died.

Kirby painted film-posters, magazine and book covers. Creating a total of over 400 cover paintings, his personal preference was for science fiction jackets (for example see Robert Silverberg's Majipoor novels and Kirby's own Voyage of the Ayeguy) and his work on the covers of Terry Pratchett's Discworld series of novels is well known. He also created the poster art for Monty Python's Life of Brian and Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi.

Charles de Lint said Kirby stood apart from most genre commercial artists for "his own flair and unique vision". He worked almost exclusively in oils.

In 1991, Paper Tiger Books published a graphic album collecting some commercial and private works by Kirby, titled In the Garden of Unearthly Delights (a reference to Hieronymus Bosch's painting The Garden of Earthly Delights). This was followed in 1999 by another graphic album titled A Cosmic Cornucopia, which includes extensive text by David Langford and two chapters dedicated to his work for Terry Pratchett's Discworld series.
Source: Wikipedia
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Roy Krenkel biography

Roy Krenkel biography

Roy Gerald Krenkel (11 July 1918 – 24 February 1983; USA)
Roy Krenkel, who often signed his work RGK, was an influential American illustrator who specialized in fantasy and historical drawings and paintings for books, magazines and comic books.

His artwork revealed the strong influence of artist Norman Lindsay, in addition to Franklin Booth, Joseph Clement Coll and J. Allen St. John. Before serving in World War II, he studied with George Bridgman at the Art Students League of New York.

After WWII, he attended Burne Hogarth's classes at the Cartoonists and Illustrators School, which became the School of Visual Arts. There he met a group of young cartoonists, including Joe Orlando, Frank Frazetta and Al Williamson. Frazetta noted, "I met Roy Krenkel back in 1949 or 1950, and he has never ceased to be a constant source of inspiration to me—a truly conscientious artist who will not tolerate incompetence."

Krenkel sometimes collaborated with Frazetta and Williamson on pages the trio drew for EC Comics particularly in Weird Science, Weird Fantasy and Weird Science-Fantasy. His splash page contribution to Williamson's “Food for Thought” (Incredible Science Fiction 32, November–December 1955), a highly detailed alien landscape, is often regarded as a peak achievement in comic book illustration. Krenkel only drew one solo story for EC, the unsigned “Time to Leave” (Incredible Science Fiction 31, September–October, 1955), displaying a futuristic cityscape of architectural splendors. Krenkel inked many of Williamson's comic stories for Marvel and ACG in the 1950s as well.

Krenkel was known for regarding his own work as disposable and unimportant.

He did several illustrations for science fiction magazines. Science fiction author Harry Harrison recalled, “Krenkel was a master penciler. I know. When he shared a studio with me and Wally Wood, I inked one of his illustrations for Marvel Science Fiction magazine. The influence of fine artists Norman Lindsay and Alma Tadema can be seen in his work.”

Notable are his 23 paperback book cover paintings as well as frontispieces for Edgar Rice Burroughs and other fantasy writers published by Donald A. Wollheim at Ace Books. During the late 1960s, he created cover paintings for DAW Books and Lancer Books. When Lancer revived Robert E. Howard, creator of Conan the Barbarian, with revisions by L. Sprague de Camp, Krenkel was cited by cover artist Frazetta as a consultant. Krenkel also created preliminary roughs which Frazetta modified and used when he painted covers for Warren Publishing's Creepy and Eerie. Krenkel drew one-page "Creepy's Loathsome Lore" and "Eerie's Monster Gallery" stories as well as rough layouts and inks for "H2O World" with collaborator Al Williamson.

During the 1970s, he illustrated both covers and interiors for Howard's The Sowers of the Thunder and The Road of Azrael, published by Donald M. Grant. It was at this time Krenkel created seven special paintings for a limited edition portfolio illustrating the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. He also contributed to several science-fantasy fan publications, including Richard A. Lupoff's Xero, the Burroughs-oriented ERBdom and Amra, devoted to the works of Howard.

Danton Burroughs, the grandson of Edgar Rice Burroughs, commented, “Roy Krenkel was a key factor in the 1960s revival of my grandfather's writings. Krenkel's illustrations forever secured his position as one of the all-time great Edgar Rice Burroughs illustrators.”

Following his death, Krenkel's friends Archie Goodwin and Al Williamson created the story "Relic", published in Epic Illustrated #27, as a tribute to him.

In 1963, Krenkel won the Hugo Award for Best Professional Artist.
Roy Krenkel art
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Bernie Krigstein biography

Bernie Krigstein biography

Bernard Krigstein (22 March 1919 - 8 January 1990; USA)
Bernie Krigstein was an American illustrator and gallery artist who received acclaim for his innovative and influential approach to comic book art, notably in EC Comics. He was known as Bernie Krigstein, and his artwork usually displayed the signature B. Krigstein.

Born in Brooklyn, New York City, Krigstein was trained as a classical painter.

Krigstein's best known work in comic books is the short story "Master Race", originally published in the debut issue (April 1955) of EC Comics' Impact. The protagonist is a former Nazi death camp commandant named Reissman who had managed to elude justice until he is spotted ten years later riding the New York City Subway. This story was remarkable for its subject matter, since the Holocaust was rarely discussed in popular media of the 1950s, as indicated by the controversy that same year surrounding Alain Resnais's Night and Fog (1955).

Krigstein, who sometimes chafed at the limits of the material EC gave him to illustrate, expanded what had been planned for six-pages into an eight-page story. The results were so striking that the company reworked the issue to accommodate the two extra pages. Krigstein had stretched out certain sequences in purely visual terms; repetitive strobe-like drawings mimic the motion of a passing train, and Commandant Reissman's final moment of life is broken down into four individual poses of desperate physical struggle. Art Spiegelman described the effect in The New Yorker: "The two tiers of wordless staccato panels that climax the story... have often been described as 'cinematic', a phrase thoroughly inadequate to the achievement: Krigstein condenses and distends time itself... Reissman's life floats in space like the suspended matter in a lava lamp. The cumulative effect carries an impact—simultaneously visceral and intellectual—that is unique to comics."

Krigstein also did humor, such as "From Eternity Back to Here" in Mad #12, "Bringing Back Father" in Mad #17 and "Crash McCool" in Mad #26. His wife, Natalie, wrote romance comics during the genre's peak. They had a daughter, Cora, in 1949.

In the early 1960s, Krigstein left comics in order to draw and paint illustrations for magazines, book jackets (notably, the first edition of Richard Condon's The Manchurian Candidate) and record albums, eventually turning away from commercial assignments in order to focus on fine art. In 1962, he took a position at the High School of Art and Design in Manhattan, where he taught for 20 years.

As he told a 1962 interviewer, "It's what happens between these panels that's so fascinating. Look at all that dramatic action that one never gets a chance to see. It's between these panels that the fascinating stuff takes place. And unless the artist would be permitted to delve into that, the form must remain infantile."
Bernie Krigstein art
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Harvey Kurtzman biography

Harvey Kurtzman biography

Harvey Kurtzman (3 October 1924 – 21 February 1993; Brooklyn, New York, USA)
Harvey Kurtzman was an American cartoonist and editor of comic books and magazines. His large body of work includes writing and editing the parodic comic book Mad from 1952 until 1956, and the sexy and satirical Little Annie Fanny strips in Playboy from 1962 until 1988. His work is noted for its satire and parody of popular culture, social critique, and an obsessive attention to detail. His working method has been likened to that of an auteur, and those who illustrated his stories were expected to follow his layouts strictly.

Born to Jewish immigrants, Kurtzman took early to cartooning. After graduating from New York's High School of Music & Art, he spent the 1940s doing freelance work for various publishers and publications before getting regular work at EC Comics in 1950, writing and drawing for their New Trend line of comic books. He wrote and edited the Two-Fisted Tales and Frontline Combat war comic books, where he also drew many of the carefully researched stories, before he created his most-remembered comic book, Mad, in 1952.

The Kurtzman-scripted stories were drawn by top EC cartoonists, most frequently Will Elder, Wally Wood, and Jack Davis; the early Mad was noted for its social critique and parodies of pop culture. The comic book switched to a magazine format in 1955, and Kurtzman left it in 1956 over a dispute with EC's owner William Gaines over financial control. Following his departure, he did a variety of cartooning jobs, including editing the short-lived Trump and the self-published Humbug. In 1959, he produced the first book-length work of original comics, the adult-oriented, satirical Jungle Book.

He edited the low-budget Help! from 1960 to 1965, a humor magazine which featured work by future Monty Python member Terry Gilliam and the earliest work of underground cartoonists such as Robert Crumb and Gilbert Shelton. He brought Help! to an end after the success of the risqué Playboy feature Little Annie Fanny began to take up too much of his time. While Annie Fanny provided much of his income for the rest of his career, he continued to produce an eclectic body of work, including screenwriting the animated Mad Monster Party? in 1967 and directing, writing and designing several shorts for Sesame Street in 1969.

From 1973, Kurtzman taught cartooning at the School of Visual Arts in New York. His work gained greater recognition toward the end of his life, and he oversaw deluxe reprintings of much of his work. The Harvey Award was named in Kurtzman's honor in 1988. He was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 1989, and his work earned five positions on The Comics Journal's Top 100 Comics of the 20th Century.
Source: Wikipedia
Harvey Kurtzman art
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T S La Fontaine biography

T S La Fontaine biography

Thomas Sherwood La Fontaine (21 December 1915 - 2007)
Tom was born in Smyrna (now Izmir), Turkey. His parents (both English) were in the carpet trade there. Tom went to preparatory school in England at Rottingdean near Brighton, with his older brother Geoff. They excelled at sport both there and later at Tonbridge School where Tom was captain of cricket. At Tonbridge Tom painted a large mural in the art school, which remained there for several decades and ironically was removed when Tom’s son – Robin, was a pupil there in about 1972.

Tom began a lengthy correspondence course – the John Hassell course, from Regent School of Art, while he was still at Tonbridge. He felt that an artist should not only be able to paint but be able to draw well. His sister – Madge was often used as a model as he practised drawing. When he left Tonbridge he went to London to Art School.

The war interrupted his training as an artist and both he and Geoff served in the Beds and Herts regiment, and he saw active service in North Africa, Italy (Cassino) and was also at Dunkirk. He was wounded when a machine gun volley hit him first in the left calf, then in the right thigh and the third bullet killed the soldier next to him. While he was in hospital (twice) he continued painting and drawing. Madge would send him paints and canvases. Geoff was killed on May 6th 1943 at the age of 29 - only three months after arriving in North Africa.

After the war he continued his training as a portrait painter and initially did a lot of commercial art from his studio in London. He also did many illustrations for the girls' magazine Girl and for the comic Eagle, the educational magazine Look and Learn, as well as book illustrations.

He went often to the London zoo in Regent’s Park to draw animals. Some of his first commissioned work was from patients of his sister, Madge - who worked in London as a physiotherapist. One of her patients was Mrs Procter-Warner who saw a picture Tom had done of a green budgerigar in a cage. She liked it so much she bought it. She also commissioned him to do the painting called “Impromptu” which was one of many of his pictures displayed in the Royal Academy of Art in London.

Tom married in 1947 to Margaret Storey. Margaret’s passion was horses and she always had a collection of horses and donkeys that were all used as models in Tom’s pictures. The dogs and local cows featured prominently too. In the early years when there were fewer commissions, Tom would do several pictures of the family owned pets – especially in winter - that were later sold. His work was displayed in Ackermans gallery in London from 1962 and many commissions came his way through the gallery.

Tom traveled extensively over the years to paint commissioned pictures throughout Europe, South Africa, Asia and America. Indeed, his trips to America became regular – once or twice a year, and many of his clients became good friends and kept up with him over the years.

In the last 8-10 years of his life as he reduced the number of commissioned works, he started to do more pictures for his own enjoyment. He had done some details from pictures by Rubens and he enjoyed having more time to develop his own style. He really enjoyed the “Wounded Diana” pictures that he was able to do in his last few years. The ‘hounds’ in those pictures were family pets and featured regularly in his pictures. One wonders what more creations he would have done – given more time.

He once said that it was a wonderful thing to have work that was also his hobby and that he would never stop painting – and he never did. Even on holidays he would have his sketchbook and watercolours with him. When he was at home he would be in his studio all morning, then he would work in the vegetable garden, chop wood, or repair fences in the afternoon. If there was no commission he was working on then he would begin his own picture.

He painted many hundreds of pictures through his lifetime although many of the early ones remain unrecorded. Then there was a period of black and white photography. Latterly though he always photographed the completed picture before it left the studio. Fortunately most of them were catalogued a few years before his death although some are still ‘unknown’.

During his final illness, as he reviewed photos of his work, he remarked that he was pleased that he had painted so many pictures. He brushed with royalty in painting Princess Anne and Prince Charles – the latter giving him a sitting at Buckingham Palace. His pictures have appeared in auctions mistakenly attributed to such great artists as Munnings and Stubbs.
Source: http://www.lafontaineartist.com & The Illustration Art Gallery
T S La Fontaine art
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Bill Lacey biography

Bill Lacey biography

Bill Lacey (1917 - 2000)
Bill Lacey was one of the finest storytellers British comics ever produced. Born in 1917, he served in Bomber Command in the RAF during World War II. In 1947 he worked for Jackman Studios Bible publishers and drew amongst others The Story of Jesus. He then moved to work on the prestigious comic Mickey Mouse Weekly in which he drew Robin Alone. It was in Super Detective Library that he really made his mark, drawing #3 Bulldog Drummond, #54 The Riddle of the Blue Men, various Dirk Rogers adventures and all the Blackshirt issues starting at #103 'Wanted - Blackshirt. He also drew 4 of the John Steel Special Agent World War II issues : #157, #160, #165 and #171. He only drew two Thriller Picture Library issues #76 The Covered Wagon and #347 Operation Freedom.

He contributed to girls comics including The Circus Ballerina for Princess. He also worked for Film Fun, Buster, Tiger, Lion and Valiant. He then went to work for the marvellous magazine Look & Learn where he drew a version of Great Expectations and Eagles Over the Western Front a Biggles inspired WW1 series that saw Lacey excelling in depicting action packed dogfights over the French countryside. His other main strip for Look & Learn was Agent of the Queen which told the adventures of a Victorian James Bond. In the 1970s his style and expertise were used in Battle Picture Weekly and Valiant, and numerous other annuals.

We are pleased to offer some outstanding 1972 episodes of original art from Eagles Over the Western Front.
Bill Lacey art

See also the complete Eagles Over The Western Front stories collected in three volumes.
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Mike Lacey biography

Mike Lacey biography

Mike Lacey; UK
Mike Lacey is a prolific artist whose work has appeared in nearly all Fleetway/IPC funnies since the 1970s. For many years, he drew 'X-Ray Specs' for Monster Fun and Buster. His many features for Whoopee! include 'Blinketty Blink', 'Bumpkin Billionaire's', 'Jimmy Fix-it', 'Chip', 'Kid's Court', and 'Scared Stiff-Sam'. For Whizzer and Chips, he made 'Boy Butler', 'Pete's Pocket', 'Phil Fitt', 'Sid's Snake' and 'Slow Coach'.

He also made many features for Jackpot ('Cry Baby', 'Ritchie Wraggs', 'Snap Happy'), Shiver and Shake ('Match of the Week'), Monster Fun ('Art's Gallery'), Buster ('Nightmare on Erm Street', 'Strongarm'), Cor!! ('Wacky'), Cheeky ('Speed Squad'), Wow ('Ship-wreck School') and Knockout ('The Super Seven'). He eventually turned to commercial artwork.

He is the son of artist Bill Lacey ('Super Detective Library' and 'Eagles over the Western Front').
Source: Lambiek Comiclopedia
Mike Lacey art
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Ronald Lampitt biography

Ronald Lampitt biography

Ronald George Lampitt (born 16 March 1906 - October 1988; Worcester, UK)
Ronald Lampitt produced illustrations for magazines, including Zoo, Passing Show, Illustrated, Modern Wonder, John Bull, Look and Learn and Treasure. In the early 1950s, he could be found in the pages of Mickey Mouse Weekly, illustrating "The Story of Lassie".

His main subject was landscape paintings and paintings of rural scenes; his scenic views of towns were published as travel posters by railway companies, including G.W.R. and Southern Railway.

His book illustrations included work for Summer Pie, Oxford University Press and Ladybird Books, many of them in collaboration with Henry James Deverson (1908-1972). Lampitt's association with Deverson included working on the Mainly for Children series published by the Sunday Times in the early 1960s but also went deeper as Lampitt was married to H.J.'s sister, Mona Deverson (1911-1995), in 1938. The couple had two daughters, Judy and Susan.

Lampitt lived for some five decades (1938/88) at the same address, 10 Old Farm Road East, Sidcup, Kent. His death was registered in Bexley, Kent in October 1988, aged 82.

An interesting photo from circa 1900 appears on the Getty Images website of Henry Lampitt, captioned "grandfather of the artist Ronald Lampitt, at home with his family in Fladbury, Worcestershire". A little digging turns up a few facts about Henry ... he was born in Fladbury in 1851 and was resident there until his death in 1922. He was married in 1874 and had 11 children. Henry's third son, Rowland Edward Lampitt (1879-1959), a clerk with Great Western Railways, was married in 1904 to Florence Pope and Ronald was the first of three sons. His father's job meant that Ronald probably grew up in Fladbury, Worcestershire, and in Middlesex, youngest brother John being born in Brentford in 1920.
Source: Steve Holland (Bear Alley)
Ronald Lampitt art
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David Langdon biography

David Langdon biography

David Langdon (24 February 1914 - 18 November 2011; UK)
David Langdon was born in London in 1914, the son of Bennett Langdon and his wife Bess. Keen on drawing from the age of four, he studied "Design and Decoration" at Davenant Grammar School, London, and contributed sketches to the school magazine. However, he was largely self-taught. Langdon's parents did not regard art as offering a worthwhile career, and in 1931 he left school to work in the Architects Department of the London County Council. For the next five years he concentrated on professional qualifications, but in 1935 he had his first cartoons published in the LCC staff journal, London Town.

In 1936 Langdon sold his first cartoon - a joke about Mussolini - to Time and Tide, and in 1937 he was invited to contribute to Punch after meeting Kenneth Bird, who was then its Art Director. Langdon felt at home at the Punch office. "It was a holy-of-holies sort of atmosphere", he recalled: "It was all very quiet, with highly-polished floors." Styles of cartoon were changing and Langdon's work suited the moment. As he recalled, "I concentrated on pure humour at a time when the simplified drawing and the short caption were taking over from the stylised drawing and the copious legend." In 1937 Langdon began contributing to the new magazine Lilliput, and sold an idea for an advertisement to Shell.

On the outbreak of war in 1939 Langdon left the LCC to become an Executive Officer in the London Rescue Service. At the same time he began to make a name for himself as a cartoonist, recalling later that "we minor cartoonists left it to David Low to satirise and exhort and try to move mountains": "We occupied ourselves with the minutiae of life as it was lived hour by hour in the shortest term view. We were flattered by having our work together with Low's described as contributing to the war effort." Langdon produced a series of wartime information cartoons for London Transport featuring Billy Brown of London Town, with verses by Richard Usborne. These became so famous that they inspired a song by Noel Gay: "Who stood up and saved the town when London Bridge was falling down? Mr Brown of London town."

In 1941 Langdon's first book of cartoons was published, entitled Home Front Lines. In the same year he joined the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, eventually becoming a squadron leader and, from 1945 to 1946, editor of the Royal Air Force Journal. Langdon worked quickly, and it was noted in 1942 that "it takes him about twenty minutes to finish a drawing." His wartime output was large and very popular, and on his demobilisation in 1946 he became a freelance, making regular contributions to Punch. In 1948 he started a long association with the Sunday Pictorial, later renamed the Sunday Mirror, by contributing a weekly column of topical cartoons, and in 1952 he also began contributing to the New Yorker.

In 1953 Langdon created Professor Puff and His Dog Wuff for Eagle, the children's comic, and a book of these strips was published in 1957. In 1958 Langdon was elected to the Punch Table. His drawings also appeared in Paris-Match, Radio Times, Saturday Evening Post, Aeroplane, Royal Air Force Review, Collier's, True and The Spectator. From 1959 he produced an annual racing calendar for Ladbrokes. He also drew a set of caricatures of lawyers and High Court judges, and produced a considerable amount of advertising work including drawings for Bovril, Winsor & Newton, Shell, Schweppes and others.

Langdon had an economical style, citing his influences as Honore Daumier and Kenneth Bird ("Fougasse"). He once described his method of working as "controlled mind-wandering": "You pick something out of the paper - I'm very much a current affairs cartoonist, you know - you think about it, your mind wanders away, you pull it back, it wanders away again, you pull it back once more, and by now the gag is beginning to stare you in the face." For the final version he would use a brush and ink over a pencil outline drawn half larger than reproduction size on white Bristol board. He claimed to have introduced the "open mouth" into humorous art, to indicate who is speaking.

In 1977 Langdon described his weekly routine. On Monday he would go through the papers, and in the evening rough out his Punch cartoons. The next day he would take them into the Punch office, returning home in the afternoon to work on the finished versions. On Wednesday he would take the finished cartoons to the Punch editorial lunch, and in the afternoon begin working on his roughs for the Sunday Mirror. On Thursday he would take these roughs to the Mirror office, and remained there until the chosen cartoons were finished. A devoted supporter of Wycombe Wanderers football club, where he sat for a time on the committee, his daughter recalled that "watching the Blues and playing golf at Harewood Downs were my father's way of relaxing at the end of a week thinking up new and original ideas for cartoons".

In 1988 Langdon was awarded an OBE and elected FRSA. In 1990 he stopped working for the Sunday Mirror, and he also stopped working for Punch when it folded in 1992, having contributed at least 5,000 cartoons to the magazine. In 2001 he was given a Lifetime Achievement Award by the Cartoon Art Trust. David Langdon died peacefully in his sleep on 18 November 2011, at the age of 97.
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Frank Langford biography

Frank Langford biography

Frank Langford (1926 - 1998; UK)
Cyril Eidlestein / Frank Langford were one and the same artist, born Cyril J. Eidlestein. He changed his name by deed in the 1960s to Frank Langford.

He first appears in comics in the late 1950s drawing for Roxy and then leaps to collectors' attention as the artist of the comic strips 'The Angry Planet' in Boy's World in 1963 and 'Lady Penelope' in Lady Penelope in 1966-69.

Most fans lose sight of him after his work for Countdown and TV Action in the early 1970s but a keen eye will spot his name in countless advertising strips from the 1960s onwards. The KP Outer Spacers adverts (part 1, part 2, part 3) appeared in 1982.

He is also known for drawing 'Jack and Jill', which ran in The Herald and The Sun tabloids.
Source: Steve Holland (Bear Alley) & The Illustration Art Gallery
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Clint Langley biography

Clint Langley biography

Clint Langley; UK
Clint Langley is a British comic book artist best known for his work on series with Pat Mills at 2000 AD and as the cover artist for Marvel Comics' Guardians of the Galaxy.

He is an artist who combines painting, photography and digital art and as well as his work in comics, he has provided the art for role-playing games and collectible cards.

Langley went to Hastings College and studied art and design.

Langley's first published work was with Nighfall Games's role-playing game SLA Industries in 1993. His work appeared in their first three books, SLA Industries, Karma and Mort, for which he painted the cover. He also provided the large wrap-around painting for the game's GM's Screen.

Langley began his career at 2000 AD on Dinosty with Pat Mills, and went on to work on some of the comics flagship titles, like Judge Dredd and Sinister Dexter.

He has since repeatedly collaborated with Mills, most notably on his long-running series ABC Warriors and Sláine where he is the current artist on both.

Mills also has formed Repeat Offenders with Langley and Jeremy Davis "to develop graphic novel concepts with big-screen potential" and the first project will be an, as yet unpublished, graphic novel called American Reaper. It has been option by Trudie Styler's Xingu Films and Mills will be writing the screenplay.

Since 2007 he has also got work in the American comic book market providing covers for Marvel Comics, especially those connected with Dan Abnett, who he worked with on Sinister Dexter, leading to a run on the modern incarnation of the Guardians of the Galaxy.
Source: Wikipedia
Clint Langley art
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Andy Lanning biography

Andy Lanning biography

Andy Lanning; UK
Andy Lanning is a British comic book writer and inker, known for his work for Marvel Comics and DC Comics, and for his collaboration with Dan Abnett.

Lanning works primarily at Marvel Comics and DC Comics as an inker. He has also pencilled books, such as his creation The Sleeze Brothers.

Lanning's writing has included his and Abnett's 2000 relaunch of DC's title Legion of Super-Heroes. The two co-created the Resurrection Man character with artist Jackson Guice in 1997.

Lanning and Abnett also collaborated on an ongoing Nova series for Marvel, which premiered in 2007. The duo previously authored a Nova miniseries as a tie-in for the Marvel crossover Annihilation, starring Richard Rider, now the only member of the Xandarian Nova Corps. This led into their piloting the Annihilation: Conquest storyline, and the core characters from this went on to form the new Guardians of the Galaxy.

Lanning teamed up with Abnett to write the latest incarnation of The Authority, with Simon Coleby on art, as part of the World's End relaunch of the core Wildstorm titles.

It was announced at Wizard World Chicago in June 2008 that Abnett and Lanning had signed an exclusive deal with Marvel, which they hoped would give them time to work on the "cosmic" characters they dealt with, as well as more earth-based ones. The contract allows them to finish existing commitments, so they will be able to finish their fifteen issue run on The Authority. Their first major work which followed this was "War of Kings", which depicted the "cosmic" aftermath of Secret Invasion. He is also writing a Marvel/Top Cow crossover, Fusion.
Source: Wikipedia
Andy Lanning art
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Walter Lantz biography

Walter Lantz biography

Walter Benjamin Lantz (27 April 1899 – 22 March 1994; New York, USA)
Walter Lantz was an American cartoonist, animator, film producer, and director, best known for creating Woody Woodpecker and creating Walter Lantz Productions.

Lantz was born in New Rochelle, New York to Italian immigrant parents, Francesco Paolo Lantz (formerly Lanza) and Maria Gervasi from Calitri. According to Joe Adamson's biography, The Walter Lantz Story, Lantz's father was given his new surname by an immigration official who Anglicized it. Walter Lantz was always interested in art, completing a mail order drawing class at age twelve. He was inspired when he saw Winsor McCay's animated short, Gertie the Dinosaur.

While working as an auto mechanic Lantz got his first break. A wealthy customer named Fred Kafka liked his drawings on the garage's bulletin board and financed Lantz's studies at the Art Students League of New York. Kafka also helped him land a job as a copy boy at the New York American, owned by William Randolph Hearst. Lantz worked at the newspaper and attended art school at night.

By the age of 16, Lantz was working in the animation department under director Gregory La Cava. Lantz then worked at the John R. Bray Studios on the Jerry On The Job series. In 1924, Lantz directed, animated, and even starred in his first cartoon series, Dinky Doodle, and soon replaced George "Vernon" Stallings as head of production (In the 1920s, Bray began to concentrate on competing with Hal Roach, the "king of two-reelers"). Lantz moved to Hollywood, California after Bray switched to a publicity film studio in 1927, where he worked briefly for director Frank Capra and was a gag writer for Mack Sennett comedies.

In 1928, Lantz was hired by Charles B. Mintz as director on the Oswald the Lucky Rabbit cartoon series for Universal Studios. Earlier that year, Mintz and his brother-in-law George Winkler had succeeded in snatching Oswald from the character's creator, Walt Disney. Universal president Carl Laemmle grew dissatisfied with the Mintz-Winkler product and fired them, deciding instead to produce the Oswalds on the Universal lot. While schmoozing with Laemmle, Lantz wagered that if he could beat Laemmle in a game of poker, the character would be his. As fate would have it, Lantz won the bet, and Oswald was now his character.

Lantz inherited many of his initial staff, including animator Tom Palmer and musician Bert Fiske from the Winkler studio, but importantly he chose fellow New York animator, Bill Nolan, to help develop the series. Nolan's previous credentials included inventing the panorama background and developing a new, streamlined Felix the Cat. Nolan was (and still is) best known for perfecting the "rubber hose" style of animation. In September 1929, Lantz released his first cartoon, Race Riot.

By 1935, Nolan parted company with Lantz. Lantz became an independent producer, supplying cartoons to Universal instead of merely overseeing the animation department. By 1940, he was negotiating ownership for the characters he had been working with.

When Oswald had worn out his welcome, Lantz needed a new character. Meany, Miny and Moe (three ne'er-do-well chimps), Baby-Face Mouse, Snuffy Skunk, Doxie (a comic dachshund) and Jock and Jill (monkeys that resembled Warner Brothers' Bosko) were some personalities Lantz and his staff came up with. However, one character, Andy Panda, stood out and soon became Lantz's headline star for the 1939-1940 production season.

In 1940, Lantz married actress Grace Stafford. During their honeymoon, the couple kept hearing a woodpecker incessantly pecking on their roof. Grace suggested that Walter use the bird for inspiration as a cartoon character. Taking her advice, though a bit skeptical, Lantz debuted Woody Woodpecker in an Andy Panda short, Knock Knock. The brash woodpecker character was similar to the early Daffy Duck, and Lantz liked the results enough to build a series around it.

Mel Blanc supplied Woody's voice for the first three cartoons. When Blanc accepted a full-time contract with Leon Schlesinger Productions/Warner Bros. and left the Lantz studio, gagman Ben Hardaway, the man who was the main force behind Knock Knock, became the bird's voice. Despite this, Blanc's distinctive laugh was used throughout the cartoons.

During 1948, the Lantz studio created a hit Academy Award-nominated tune in "The Woody Woodpecker Song", featuring Blanc's laugh. Mel Blanc sued Lantz for half a million dollars, claiming that Lantz had used his voice in later cartoons without permission. The judge, however, ruled for Lantz, saying that Blanc had failed to copyright his voice or his contributions. Though Lantz won the case, he paid Blanc in an out-of-court settlement when Blanc filed an appeal, and Lantz went in search for a new voice for Woody Woodpecker.

In 1950, Lantz held anonymous auditions. Grace, Lantz's wife, offered to do Woody's voice; however, Lantz turned her down because Woody was a male character. Not discouraged in the least, Grace made her own anonymous audition tape, and submitted for the studio to listen to. Not knowing who was behind voice he heard, Lantz picked Grace's voice for Woody Woodpecker. Grace supplied Woody's voice until the end of production in 1972, and also performed in non-Woody cartoons. At first, Grace voiced Woody without screen credit, thinking that it would disappoint child viewers to that know Woody Woodpecker was voiced by a woman. However, she soon came to enjoy being known as the voice of Woody Woodpecker, and allowed her name to be credited on the screen. Her version of Woody was cuter and friendlier than the manic Woody of the 1940s, and Lantz's artists redesigned the character to suit the new personality.

Lantz's harmonious relationship with Universal, the studio releasing his cartoons, was jarred when new ownership transformed the company into Universal-International and did away with many of Universal's company policies. The new management insisted on owning licensing and merchandising rights to Lantz's characters. Lantz refused and withdrew from the parent company by the end of 1947, releasing 12 cartoons independently through United Artists in 1948, into the beginning of 1949. Financial difficulties forced Lantz to shut down his studio in 1949. Universal-International re-released Lantz's UA (and several earlier) cartoons during the shutdown and eventually came to terms with Lantz, who resumed production in 1951. From this point forward, Lantz worked faster and cheaper, no longer using the lush, artistic backgrounds and stylings that had distinguished his 1940s work.

Lantz used his TV appearances on The Woody Woodpecker Show (which began in 1957) to demonstrate the animation process. Later, Lantz entertained the troops during the Vietnam War and visited hospitalized veterans. Walter Lantz was a good friend of movie innovator George Pal.

By the 1960s other movie studios had discontinued their animation departments, leaving Walter Lantz as one of two producers still making cartoons for theaters (the other studio was DePatie-Freleng Enterprises). Lantz finally closed up shop in 1972 (by then, explained, it was economically impossible to continue producing them and stay in business as rising inflation had strained his profits), and Universal serviced the remaining demand with reissues of his older cartoons.

In retirement, Lantz continued to manage his properties by licensing them to media. He continued to draw and paint, selling his paintings of Woody Woodpecker rapidly. On top of that, he worked with Little League and other youth groups in his area. In 1982, Lantz donated 17 artifacts to the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, among them a wooden model of Woody Woodpecker from the cartoon character’s debut in 1941. The Lantzes also made time to visit hospitals and other institutions where Walter would draw Woody and Grace would do the Woody laugh for patients.

In 1990 "Woody Woodpecker" was honored with a star on the Hollywood "Walk Of Fame". In 1993, Lantz established a ten thousand dollar scholarship and prize for animators in his name at California Institute of the Arts in Valencia. Walter Lantz died at St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, California from heart failure on March 22, 1994, aged 94.

Some characters in the Lantz universe (both cartoons and comics) are Oswald the Lucky Rabbit (formerly), Space Mouse, Woody Woodpecker, Homer Pigeon, Chilly Willy, Charlie Chicken, Wally Walrus and many more.

In 1959 Lantz was honored by the Los Angeles City Council as "one of America's most outstanding animated film cartoonists".
In 1973 the international animation society, ASIFA/Hollywood, presented him with its Annie Award.
In 1979 he was given a special Academy Award "for bringing joy and laughter to every part of the world through his unique animated motion pictures", being the second animator to receive this award (the first was Walt Disney — who received it three times —, while Chuck Jones was in 1995 the third — and the latest — to receive the merit).
In 1986 he received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame
Source: Wikipedia
Walter Lantz art
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Don Lawrence biography

Don Lawrence biography

Don(ald Southam) Lawrence (1928 - 2003)
Born in East Sheen, London, on 17 November 1928, Don Lawrence used his gratuity from National Service to attend Borough Polytechnic to study art. He became a regular contributor to the superheroic adventures of Marvelman in 1954 before producing the Western strips Wells Fargo and Pony Express for Zip and Swift He found work with Fleetway, drawing another Western, Billy the Kid, before finding his niche drawing historical strips Karl the Viking, Olac the Gladiator and Maroc the Mighty.

Fully colour strips for Lion Annual and Bible Story, including the life of Herod the Great in the latter, led to him being offered The Trigan Empire, which debuted in the short-lived Ranger in September 1965 before finding a regular home in the educational weekly Look and Learn from June 1966. Lawrence was to draw this iconic strip for 11 years in all.

After 11 years on Trigan Empire, Lawrence helped create Storm, the story of a man catapulted into the distant future, for the Dutch weekly comic Eppo. Lawrence painted 22 volumes of Storm's adventures between 1976 and 1995. That year, Lawrence lost the sight in one eye and a final volume was completed with the assistance of Liam McCormack-Sharp in 2001. Lawrence was widely respected in continental Europe (he was made a Knight of the order of Oranje-Nassau by Queen Beatrix of Holland) and won many awards. He died on 29 December 2003, aged 75.
Don Lawrence art

See also our DON LAWRENCE BOOKS including The Trigan Empire, Storm, Karl the Viking and The Legacy.
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Frank Marsden Lea biography

Frank Marsden Lea biography

Frank Marsden Lea (born 1910; UK)
Frank Marsden Lea, born 1910. A talented artist and illustrator who, inter alia, designed posters for London County Council Tramways 1928-1932 and painted many illustrations for Look and Learn during the 1960s.

He trained at the Nottingham Art School; 1916-1917 and also attended Manchester School of Art.
Source: London Transport Museum & Illustration Art Gallery
Frank Marsden Lea art
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Joseph Lee biography

Joseph Lee biography

Joseph Lee
Joseph Lee was born in Burley-in-Wharfedale, near Leeds, on 16 May 1901. He won a scholarship to Leeds Grammar School, and showed such a talent for art that, in about 1915, his widowed mother managed to find enough money for him to attend Leeds College of Art. Here his contemporaries included Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth, and Henry Carr. Lee left the School of Art in 1918, and in 1919 took a correspondence course with Percy V. Bradshaw, sending specimens of his work to London papers. Despite the rejections, his mother found £20 for him to go to London, where he freelanced until the money ran out. He then found a job in the art department of an advertising agency.
Lee's first published cartoon appeared in The Bystander in 1920, and in the following year, when still only nineteen, he became political cartoonist on the ailing Pall Mall Gazette, with a Press Gallery pass for the House of Commons. Strand Magazine described him as "the youngest of the men of his craft who have now an established reputation." Lee spent hours sketching from the Gallery, and never forgot the disillusionment of discovering "the contrast between a Member's official utterances on the floor of the House, and the private opinions that Member afterwards expressed in the smoking-room."
In 1923 the Pall Mall Gazette was absorbed by the Evening Standard, and Lee moved on to the Liverpool Daily Courier, as cartoonist and Art Editor. In 1924 he returned to London to work on the Sunday Express, and also did some work deputising for Strube on the Daily Express. However, at this time Lee had left-wing sympathies, and in 1926 he resigned from the Sunday Express over its coverage of the General Strike. He managed to support himself with freelance work, producing a daily political or social cartoon for the Daily Chronicle, as well as syndicated cartoons for Allied Newspapers, and cartoons for Bystander, Tatler, Sketch, London Opinion, Punch and others. He then persuaded the editor of the Daily Mail to take him on, and, although the initial project failed, Lee stayed on as general artist for the paper. In 1933 he even created a comic strip - "Pin-money Myrtle" - which ran for several years.
In 1934 Lee sent four trial cartoons to the London Evening News, one of which was published on 14 May 1934 as the first of a series entitled "London Laughs." In these cartoons Lee proved particularly adept at depicting cricket-loving colonels, chubby and slightly vulgar ladies with sparkling jewellery, and dapper City gents. With the outbreak of war in September 1939 the Evening News changed the title of the series to "Smiling Through." These were also popular, and within a few years Lee was producing two cartoons a day - "Smiling Through" for the Evening News, and another for the Allied Group of provincial papers, published in Manchester, Glasgow, Cardiff, Sheffield, Middlesborough, and Aberdeen. In May 1945 "Smiling Through" reverted to the original title of "London Laughs" - although in 1946, when Lee visited the United States, it briefly appeared as "New York Laughs".
In 1949 Lee moved to Wokingham, outside London, sending his cartoons to the Evening News by train. As a contemporary account noted, Lee travelled into London on only two or three days each week, drawing his cartoons at home. To satisfy the daily publishing schedule he worked on two cartoons simultaneously, using separate drawing-boards: "At 7.30 every morning the raw material for the cartoonist's work arrives in the form of a specially-early delivery of all the daily papers. During the next two hours he squeezes the news, which is so often mainly depressing, for humorous ideas. Then, with the best two in mind, he sets out for an hour's walk. As he crosses fields or calls on farm friends, 'London Laughs' take shape ready for drawing-board and pencil the moment he gets home. By lunch-time two have been lightly sketched in."
After sketching the roughs, Lee spent between two and four hours "inking in" the two cartoons, before sending them to the paper by the 10.10am train next day. Because he relied on the morning papers of the day before publication, Lee was always two days behind the news, and when his cartoons reached the Evening News the editor had the job of deciding "whether the laugh will 'hold' - whether events sustain the idea of the cartoon." If they had not been overtaken by events the cartoons went into the paper. In 1963 the CCGB presented Lee with an award for Special Services to Cartooning, and in July 1966, having become the longest running daily cartoonist in history, with almost 9,000 "London Laughs" appearing in the Evening News, he retired to Norwich.
Lee's politics gradually changed, and by now he was a "vociferous Tory." Even in retirement he continued to produce political cartoons three days a week for the local Eastern Daily Press, and to work for children's comics such as Wham! and Whizzer & Chips. In addition Lee drew advertisements, including some for British Railways. Lee was influenced by Rowlandson and Phil May, and worked mostly in black and white using a brush and watercolour. His second marriage was to the painter Kathleen Seaman, daughter of the writer and editor H.W. Seaman. Joe Lee died on 15 March 1975.
Source: Illustration Art Gallery
Joseph Lee art
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Maurice Leloir biography

Maurice Leloir biography

Maurice Leloir (1 November 1853 - 7 October 1940; Paris, France)
Maurice Leloir, born on 1 November 1853 in Paris where he died on 7 October 1940, was an illustrator , watercolorist, draftsman, printmaker, writer and French collector.

Son and pupil of the painter Auguste Leloir and watercolorist Héloise Colin, he exhibited first at the Salon of French artists, becoming a member. He was involved, along with many other painters, in the Crozant School located in the valleys of Creusoises.

Around the 1890s, Maurice Leloir and his students, inspired by the new-fangled photographs, inundated the illustrated book market with illustartions that accurately represented the costumes and attitudes of the past, and their illustrations were hugely appreciated by the readership.

A prolific illustrator of books - notably including children's books such as Richelieu by Theodore Cahu, magazines and periodicals, he founded the Society for the History of Costume in 1907.

His brother, Alexandre-Louis Leloir, was also an accomplished and acknowledged painter and illustrator, and the author Guy de Maupassant dedicated his new book 'Idyll' to him in 1884.
Source: Wikipedia
Maurice Leloir art

See illustrators issue 14 for a Maurice Leloir feature article.
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Rick Leonardi biography

Rick Leonardi biography

Rick Leonardi (born 1957; Philadelphia, USA)
Rick Leonardi was born in Philadelphia in 1957 and grew up in New England. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1979, then had several jobs for over a decade. He started drawing for Marvel in 1980. He has drawn for various titles, including 'Spider-Man', 'Hulk', 'Vision and Scarlet Witch', 'Cloak & Dagger' and 'Uncanny X-Men'.

In the 1990s, he co-created 'Spider-Man 2099', as well as the mini-series 'Colossus TPB: God's Country' and 'Rampaging Hulk'. In addition to his Marvel work, he was present at Dark Horse in the 1990s with 'Predator' and at DC with 'Batman' and 'Teen Titans'.
Source: Lambiek
Rick Leonardi art
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Brian Lewis biography

Brian Lewis biography

Brian Moncreif Lewis (3 June 1929 - 4 December 1978; UK)
Brian Lewis is an artist whose reputation has continued to endure long after his death. Known in science fiction circles for his often abstract covers for New Worlds, Science Fantasy and Science Fiction Adventures and in comic circles for his contributions to House of Hammer, appreciation of Lewis's work has grown as more of his work for other papers and magazines is discovered.

Brian Moncreif Lewis was born on 3 June 1929 and served his National Service with the RAF. An interest in science fiction led him to co-edit and contribute to The Medway Journal fanzine in the early 1950s. His first professional sale relating to SF is thought to be an illustration relating to Journey Into Space for the Radio Times. His connections with Nova Publications began in 1954 and, between 1957 and 1962 he painted some 80 covers for their three SF magazines, his work often showing a strong surrealist influence. During the same period he also painted a number of rather more straight-forward covers for Digit Books.

Lewis made his comic strip debut in 1959, drawing early strips for Lone Star and TV Comic. However, it was with Jet Ace Logan in Tiger that he found his feet and there followed a 13-month run on Captain Condor in 1961-63. Lewis also proved adept at drawing sports and war strips, culminating in work for Eagle where he drew Mann of Battle and Home of the Wanderers. Science fiction was not forgotten and Lewis drew SF tales for Boys' World, Tiger and Hurricane. In 1964 he also proved himself as a humour artist when he began contributing cartoon strips to Wham! and, over the next few years, humour and adventure strips often ran concurrently in the pages of Smash!.

In the late 1960s, Lewis worked for the Central Office of Information on public information films and also contributed to the Beatles' animated movie Yellow Submarine. He suffered a heart attack in 1970 and struggled for some years, drawing strips for Countdown and Look-In and a series of scientific biographies for All About Science. In 1976, his agent contacted Dez Skinn suggesting Lewis as an artist for the upcoming House of Hammer; Skinn was only persuaded after seeing samples, but the connection proved fruitful, eventually leading to a brief association between Lewis and 2000AD where he drew covers and, briefly, the Dan Dare strip.

A busy artist in the late 1970s, painting books covers and contributing to The Muppet Show Diary, annuals, Vampirella and Target magazine, Lewis suffered a heart attack and died on 4 December 1978, aged only 49. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Brian Lewis art
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Gaetano (Tanino) Liberatore biography

Gaetano (Tanino) Liberatore biography

Gaetano (Tanino) Liberatore (born 12 April 1953; Quadri, Italy)
Gaetano Liberatore (), better known as Tanino Liberatore, is an Italian comics author and illustrator. His best known fictional character is RanXerox.

Born in Quadri (province of Chieti), Liberatore went to high school in Pescara where he met comics artist Andrea Pazienza. He later finished his architectural studies at the University of Rome. From 1974 to 1978, he designed record covers for RCA. In 1978 he met Stefano Tamburini and published his first work in Tamburini's comics magazine Cannibale. In 1978 Rank Xerox was born, a cyborg-punk, ultra strong creature created by Tamburini. Several stand alone hardcover albums ensued, translated in several languages.

Liberatore's work has been republished in several international comics magazines (Transfert, Métal Hurlant, A Suivre, L'Écho des savanes, Chic). The cover of Frank Zappa's The Man from Utopia album features an illustration by Tanino Liberatore, showing Zappa as RanXerox. In 1984 he drew the album cover for the New York City based ska band, The Toasters, first 7 inch release, Beat Up. During this time he also created a few 'one of a kind' pieces of art work for Toasters frontman Robert "Bucket" Hingley.

He has also done art direction for films.
Source: Wikipedia
Gaetano (Tanino) Liberatore art
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Kenneth Lilly biography

Kenneth Lilly biography

Kenneth Norman Lilly (30 December 1929 - Spring 1996; UK)
Kenneth Lilly was one of the finest of British nature artists, his drawings of wildlife - most notably the kind of wildlife you would find in your hedgerow or nearby fields - drawn with a passion and interest for the subject.

Born in Bromley, Surrey, on 30 December 1929, Lilly became a prolific contributor of illustrations and covers to Look and Learn and Treasure. He produced a number of notable series for the former, illustrating Maxwell Knight’s This Month in the Country (1967) and Ken Denham’s series on Animal Families (1968).

Lilly was also a regular illustrator of books from the 1970s onwards and an exhibition of his animal paintings was held at the Medici Galleries in London in 1983. Some of the best illustrations can be found in Kenneth Lilly’s Animals (1988). As well as books, Lilly also illustrated a set of stamps entitled Friends of the Earth, released in 1986.

In 1992, Dorling Kindersley published a series of short children's books under the title Kenneth Lilly's Animal Ark, which grouped animals with common features (feathers, scales, spots or stripes) with a single sentence description by Angela Wilkes. A later series by Tessa Potter featured different animals and different seasons. One of his most notable series was a number of books which depicted animals at life size.

Lilly, who lived in Devon, died in the spring of 1996, aged 66. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Kenneth Lilly art
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Barrie Linklater biography

Barrie Linklater biography

Barrie Linklater (born 1931, UK)
Born in Birmingham, Warwickshire, in 1931, Barrie Linklater studied at Woolwich Polytechnic School of Art and began his artistic career working in a London studio before leaving for Australia where he worked as a freelance for four years.

Returning to London, Linklater forged a reputation as a fine portrait artist and subsequently as an equestrian artist, his first commission in the latter area coming from HRH the Duke of Edinburgh during a sitting for a portrait in 1975. Equestrian work has since been commissioned by Her Majesty The Queen and the City of London amongst many others. In all he has 13 paintings in the Royal Collection and his work has been exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery. Linklater lives and works in Berkshire.

In the 1960s, Linklater contributed illustrations to Look and Learn's adaptation of H. G. Wells' The First Men in the Moon in 1963 and later, in 1967, began producing covers and illustrations on a semi-regular basis. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Barrie Linklater art
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Virginio Livraghi  biography

Virginio Livraghi biography

Virginio Livraghi (born 1924, Cremona, Italy)
Virginio Livraghi was a painter, born in Dovera in the province of Cremona in the Lombardy region of Italy, in 1924. Dovera is only 35 km southeast of Milan and it is no surprise that Livraghi gravitated to this centre of artistic excellence. In the late 1940s he worked as an animator on the famous Italian film La Rosa di Bagdad directed by Anton Gino Domenighini and quickly found a market for his illustrations with Milanese publishers Carroccio, Gino Conte, Fratelli Fabbri, Piccoli and others in the 1950s and 1960s.

His talents lay in illustrations for young children, especially fairy tales (including classics like Snow White, Aladdin, Alice in Wonderland and Pinocchio) and stories about animals (including Penny, an Italian translation of Isobel St Vincent's Penny Pullet, and Maria Pia Pezzi's Curly Pig, which made the reverse journey in translation into English).

Working via Creazioni D'Ami, Livraghi began producing delightful colour strips and illustrations for British nursery comics, beginning with a run of strips starring the comical adventures of Playhour's Leo the Friendly Lion, taking the strip over from Harold McCready in April 1960 and later handing over to another ex-animator, Bert Felstead, in February 1961.

That year, Livraghi began drawing illustrations and covers for the British educational magazine Knowledge and the Italian nursery magazine Michelino, published by the Fabbri brothers. In February 1969 he returned to the British market after a four year absence to draw illustrations featuring Brer Rabbit for Once Upon a Time. These beautiful colour illustrations would continue to appear until October 1971, although Henry Fox provided an increasing number of fill-ins from mid-1970.

It is a shame so little is known about this immensely talented artist: he was one of the best artists in the field of anthropomorphic animals to work in the UK; in Brer Rabbit especially he captured the humour and sense of mischief of the stories he illustrated as Brer constantly outwitted the wily creatures who wanted to capture him. Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Virginio Livraghi art
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Vincent Locke biography

Vincent Locke biography

Vincent Locke (born 1966, USA)
Vince Locke is an American artist, often associated with grotesque and violent fantasy and horror images, although his work has also included mainstream superhero work for Batman and The Spectre, as well as work for British comics 2000AD and Judge Dredd Megazine.

Born in Michigan in 1966, the son of a sign painter. Influenced by artists like Andrew Wyeth and turn of the century illustrators, Locke came to fan attention with his work on Deadworld, a zombie horror series created by Stuart Kerr and Ralph Griffith for their own small press outfit Arrow Comics. Deadworld, by Kerr and Locke, was launched in 1987 but lasted only seven issues before the collapse of the black & white market in the US. Deadworld was continued by Caliber Comics and Locke continued drawing the series until 1991 as well as inking Baker Street in 1989-91.

Locke found work with Vertigo, drawing or inking episodes of The Sandman (1992-93), American Freak: A Tale of the Un-Men (1994), Sandman Mystery Theatre (1994-95), Witchcraft: La Terreur (1998) and The Books of Faerie: Auberon's Tale (1998). For Paradox Press Locke drew A History of Violence (1997) written by John Wagner, which was filmed by David Cronenberg in 2005 with Viggo Mortensen in the lead role.

The artist has also been long associated with the death-metal band Cannibal Corpse. He has painted covers for all their albums starting with Eaten Back to Life in 1989. The ultraviolent images - ranging from zombie doctors to visceral birth scenes. Locke also illustrated the graphic novel Evisceration Plague which was distributed during the band's tour promoting the album of that name and featured stories based on each of the songs.

In the early 2000s, Locke was a popular contributor to White Wolf and Wizards of the Coast, producing many illustrations for the latter's Forgotten Realms role-playing games. In 2006-09, Locke drew a number of Tales from the Black Museum one-off stories for Judge Dredd Megazine, a Tharg's Future Shocks and two Judge Dredd yarns for 2000AD. He has also drawn illustrations for two collections of stories by Caitlin R. Kiernan, Frog Toes and Tentacles (2005), Tales from the Woeful Platypus (2007) and A is for Alien (2009).

Locke, married and with three children, lives in the suburbs of Michigan. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Vincent Locke art
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Bernard Long biography

Bernard Long biography

Bernard Long
Very little is known about Bernard Long. Only a few scattered examples of his work have come to light, and those mostly in the chronically underexplored world of nursery comics. Long was a contributor to Jack & Jill, drawing the lighthearted adventures of Fliptail the Otter in around 1970, and to the Jack & Jill and Teddy Bear annuals.

Although these are low on the collectable scale of most comics' fans, Long's work shouldn't be dismissed. He was an exceptionally good nature artist and it seems very likely he contributed to various educational magazines as well as nursery comics. It is thought that he contributed to Look and Learn in the late 1960s and back page artwork for Fun-To-Do in later years, for which information I should thank David Slinn, who recalls that Long was "quietly efficient, very reliable and, as a result, somewhat taken for granted." Abridged from biographical notes by Steve Holland.
Bernard Long art
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Francisco Solano López biography

Francisco Solano López biography

Francisco Solano López (26 October 1928 – 12 August 2011; Argentina)
Francisco Solano López was a comics artist. Acknowledged as one of the most influential Argentine comics artists, he was best known as the co-creator of El Eternauta.

López began his career in 1953 working for the publishing house Columba where he illustrated the series Perico y Guillerma. Working for Editorial Abril he met Héctor Germán Oesterheld, assigned to illustrate his series Bull Rocket for the magazine Misterix. They collaborated on the series Pablo Maran and Uma-Uma, before joining to start Oesterheld's publishing house Editorial Frontera. For the Frontera first publication of the monthly Hora Cero, the team produced the series Rolo el marciano adoptivo and El Héroe. López also alternated as artist on the Ernie Pike series with Hugo Pratt, Jorge Moliterni and José Antonio Muñoz. On September 4, 1957 in the publication of Hora Cero Suplemento Semanal, the science-fiction series El Eternauta made its first appearance.

A success, El Eternauta came to the attention of the authorities as the series featured commentary of the political situation of Argentina and neighbouring Chile, prompting López to flee for Spain to avoid possible arrest. In 1959 López began working for Fleetway in Madrid and later London, producing artwork for a host of series, including Galaxus: The Thing from Outer Space, Pete's Pocket Army, The Drowned World, Janus Stark, and Kelly's Eye.

Having returned to Argentina, López resumed collaboration with Oesterheld on El Eternauta II in 1968 with a new publishing house, Editorial Records. He also started work on science-fiction saga Slot-Barr with writer Ricardo Barreiro, and the police series Evaristo with Carlos Sampayo. In the late 70s López again fled Argentina following persecution from the authorities, and from Madrid he arranged the publication of both El Eternauta and Slot-Barr with the Italian magazines LancioStory and Skorpio.

In the 90s, Solano Lopez produced work in the erotic comics genre, achieving hits with El Prostíbulo del Terror, from a story by Barreiro, and Silly Symphony, made for the magazine Kiss Comix.

Solano López died on August 12, 2011 from a cerebral hemorrhage.
Source: Wikipedia
Francisco Solano López art
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Orson Lowell biography

Orson Lowell biography

Orson Byron Lowell (1871 - 1956; Wyoming, Iowa)
Orson Lowell was an American artist and illustrator of covers and interiors for leading magazines.

Born in Wyoming, Iowa, Lowell was the son of landscapist Milton H. Lowell. He was 11 years old when his family moved in 1882 to Chicago. Lowell attended public school in Chicago until 1887, when he began taking classes at the Art Institute of Chicago, where he studied with J.H. Vanderpoel and Oliver Dennett Grover.

In November 1893, Lowell moved to New York City to build his career. By 1905, his work was in high enough demand to allow him to buy a house in New Rochelle, New York while maintaining his studio in New York. New Rochelle came to be a well-known art colony and illustrator's community soon after his arrival. Residents there included Norman Rockwell, Edward Penfield, J. C. Leyendecker, Franklin Booth and Coles Phillips.

By 1907, he became known for his cartoons with a social message published in the humor magazine Life. A contemporary of illustrator Charles Dana Gibson, Lowell illustrated for major magazines, including American Girl, Century, Cosmopolitan, The Delineator, Judge, Ladies' Home Journal, Leslie's Weekly, McCall's, McClure's, Metropolitan Life, Puck, The Saturday Evening Post, Scribner's, Redbook, Vogue and Woman's Home Companion.

Lowell was a very social individual, joined most of the arts clubs in New York and held positions in many of them. Among these were the Players Club, the Society of Illustrators (where he was among the first group of non-founding members), the Guild of Free Lance Artists (where he served as president 1924-25), the New Rochelle Art Association and the New Rochelle Public Library, where he was a trustee from 1930 until 1944.
Source: Wikipedia
Orson Lowell art
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Lewis Lupton biography

Lewis Lupton biography

Lewis F Lupton (1909 - 1996)
Illustrator for Macmillan's History Class Pictures, published from 1951.
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Sydney Seymour Lucas biography

Sydney Seymour Lucas biography

Sydney Charles Seymour Lucas (9 May 1878 - 1954; England)
Sydney Seymour Lucas was an illustrator and portrait painter, the son of artist J. Seymour Lucas, R.A. (1849-1923) and his wife, also an artist, Paris-born Marie Elizabeth, daughter of Louis Dieudonne de Cornelissen (1851-1921), then living at 21 Queen Square. Born Sydney Charles Seymour Lucas on 9 May 1878, he was baptized at St John the Evangelist, Westminster, on 1 June 1878. In the 1880s, the family moved to 1 Woodchurch Road, St. John, West Hampstead, a purpose-built studio and home designed by John Seymour Lucas's friend, the architect Sydney Williams-Lee.

Lucas was educated in Suffolk (in 1891, he was boarding with James George Easton, vicar of St Margaret's Church, Ilkeshall St Margaret), Westminster School (1892-95) and at the Royal Academy Schools, and began selling illustrations professionally around the turn of the century (some references give the dates his work flourished as 1904-40).

Lucas was married in 1905 to Mary Douglas Clark. By 1911, Lucas and his family, which now included a son, Arthur Henry Seymour-Lucas, born in 1908, were living at 61 Rudolph Road, Bushey, Hertfordshire. Mary Douglas Seymour-Lucas died, in 1933, at the early age of 48 at the time, the Lucas family were living at 64 Falconer Road, Bushey.

Lucas worked at 6 Albert Studios, Albert Bridge Road, Battersea, in 1934. His younger sister, Marie Ellen Seymour Lucas (later Grubbe), also studied as an artist.

Lucas died in Blyth, Sussex, in 1954, aged 76. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Sue Macartney Snape biography

Sue Macartney Snape biography

Sue Macartney Snape
Sue Macartney Snape has been poking fun at British stereotypes for over fifteen years in the pages of the Saturday Telegraph Magazine. With pin-sharp commentary by Victoria Mather, she has skewered fanciful fashions and foibles since 1994 in their weekly 'Social Stereotypes' column. John Julius Norwich has described her as a "master of caricature" and has said that her paintings "illustrate the English social scene more brilliantly and with greater accuracy than those of any other painter working today." Cartoonist Martin Rowson has said her artwork "can encapsulate an entire social milieu in a drooping eyelid or a flared nostril." Elsewhere she has been described as the "Wodehouse of Art".

Born in Tanzania, Sue Macartney Snape grew up in Australia, arriving in London in 1980. She has exhibited widely, including sell out exhibitions with David Ker, Jonathan Clark and at the Sloane Club. She has also painted many commissions, including ones from Glyndebourne, The Metropolitan Opera and Barbara Amiel (Mrs. Conrad Black).

She won the 2004 Pont Award for drawing the British Character for her funny, colourful caricatures of folks from all walks of life, which have been collected in a series of books over the years. Another book, Araminta's Wedding, was a humorous story of the upper classes by Jilly Cooper. From biographical notes by Steve Holland.
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Peter Maddocks biography

Peter Maddocks biography

Peter Maddocks (born 1 April 1928; Birmingham, UK)
Peter Maddocks is a noted British cartoonist who has contributed to many of the UK's leading Daily and Sunday national papers with cartoon series such as ‘Four D. Jones’ at the Daily Express in the late 50s and early 60s and 'No.10' in the 60s and 70s.

He has also created animated films for the BBC including The Family Ness, Penny Crayon and Jimbo and the Jet-Set.

Maddocks was born in Birmingham. In 1939 he won a scholarship to the Moseley School of Art in that city. He was taught by a man named Norman Pett at the Moseley School of Art. At the age of 15, Maddocks decided to leave school and join the Merchant Navy from 1943-1949.

After his 6 years in the Navy, he set up his own advertising agency where he designed cinema posters and wrote western series. He produced his first cartoons for the Daily Sketch from 1953-1954. From 1955-1965 he worked for the Daily Express where he created his infamous comic strip 'Four D. Jones'. In this comic, a cowboy traveled in the fourth dimension. This comic was a success for 10 years for the Sunday Express.

He later became the Cartoon Editor for Express Newspapers from 1965-1966 and from 1968-1971 was the Special Features Editor of King Magazine. Maddocks' characters tend to be goggle-eyed with splayed-out fingers.

Maddocks has made contributions to the following:
Daily Star
Daily Record
Manchester Evening News
Mail on Sunday
Private Eye
Daily Mirror
Daily Telegraph
Evening Standard
Evening News
Sunday Telegraph
Mayfair
Woman's Own
Source: Wikipedia
Peter Maddocks art

See illustrators issue 3 for a Peter Maddocks feature article.
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Robert Maguire biography

Robert Maguire biography

Robert A Maguire (3 August 1921 - 26 February 2005; USA)
Robert Maguire painted over 600 covers for such publishers as Pocket, Dell, Ace, Harper, Avon, Silhouette, Ballantine, Pyramid, Bantam, Lion, Berkeley, Beacon and Monarch - virtually every mainstream publishing house in New York - making his original cover art a tour de force in the last half of the twentieth century.

Robert Maguire began his education at Duke University, but like so many others of his generation, left for service in World War II. Upon his return, his interest in art led him to the Art Students League, where his instructor was the famed Frank Reilly. Two of Maguire's more noteworthy fellows included Clark Hulings and Jimmy Bama, graduates all of the class of '49. Mr. Maguire is a Member Emeritus of The Society of Illustrators.

Bob Maguire's career took off immediately with his first work for Trojan Publications: cover art for their line of small pocket pulps, with titles like Hollywood Detective Magazine (Oct. 1950). Maguire did three of the eight covers for this pocket pulp series. From then on, his career blossomed.

His classic period of the 50s and 60s grew out of his skilled female images, some of the best and most memorable of the period. Maguire's mastery of the femme fatale created a vintage paperback icon: his women are passionate yet somehow down to earth, approachable, though sometimes at your own risk. These images compel one to wonder what led up to that instant in time and where it will lead next, the very stuff of timeless art.

Robert Maguire continued evolving and his contributions to the golden age of noir art are legion. That period, fraught with reaction and change, produced extremes. Life in the 1950s was set against a backdrop of Joe McCarthy, Ezekiel Gathing and their ilk, ranting of fear and hatred, while the USA was experiencing a social revolution that reverberates to this day. R. A. Maguire's work is a window on the birth of that revolution.
Robert Maguire art
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Bill Mainwaring biography

Bill Mainwaring biography

Bill Mainwaring (Active 1950s - 1970s)
Bill Mainwaring was a British comic book artist, who was active in at least the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. In the late 1950s, he drew 'Son of Glory' and 'Pathfinder' for Express, followed by 'Blue for Danger' and 'The Eric Sykes Story' for T.V. Express in 1960 and 1961. Another TV-related comic by Mainwaring was 'Bootsy & Snudge', that ran in TV Comic in 1961. In 1964, he was also present in Wham! with the adventure/humour strip 'Billy Binns and His Wonderful Specs' (script by Ted Cowan).

Mainwaring was the artist of the romantic and exciting girls' comic 'Princess Anita' in School Friend around the same time. This serial also ran in Dutch magazine Sjors. Mainwaring continued to work for girls' magazines and annuals until the 1970s, appearing regularly in such publications as June, Tammy and Sally (with 'Sara's Kingdom').
Source: Lambiek
Bill Mainwaring art
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Milo Manara biography

Milo Manara biography

Maurilio Manara (born September 12, 1945; Italy)
Milo Manara is an Italian comic book writer and artist, best known for his erotic approach to the medium.

After architecture and painting studies, he made his comics debut in 1969 drawing for Genius, a Fumetti neri series of pocket books from publisher Furio Vanio in the wake of the popularity of Kriminal and Satanik.

In 1970 he provided illustrations for the magazine Terror, and starting in 1971 drew the erotic series Jolanda de Almaviva written by Francisco Rubino, issued in small format by publisher Erregi. Joining the youth magazine Il Corriere dei Ragazzi, he worked with Rubino, Carlo Barbieri, Mino Milani and Silverio Pisú.

With Pisú Manara he launched the publications Telerompo and Strategia della Tensione in 1974 and the series Alessio, Il Borghese Rivoluzionario, and with writer Mino Milani the series La parola alla giuria in 1975. Manara and Pisú later went on to publish Lo Scimmiotto (The Ape) along the story of the Chinese Monkey King in Alter Linus in 1976, and with Alfredo Castelli, L'Uomo delle Nevi (The Snowman) in 1978.

During this period Manara began publishing work in several Franco-Belgian comics magazines including Charlie Mensuel, Pilote and L'Écho des savanes. Manara created the first stories featuring HP and Giuseppe Bergman, which grew to become a large body of work. The character "HP" is based on Manara's friend, the Italian comics creator Hugo Pratt, and a collaborator on some of Manara's most acclaimed work, initially Tutto ricominciò con un'estate indiana (1983, Indian Summer) and later El Gaucho (1991). Manara also completed two stories working with another of his heroes, Federico Fellini. In his own right Manara has been commended on his skills as a scenarist, as with the western L'uomo di carta (1982, The Paper Man).

Manara's reputation for producing comics that revolve around elegant, beautiful women caught up in unlikely and fantastical erotic scenarios became solidified with work such as Il Gioco (1983, also known as Click or Le Déclic), about a device which renders women helplessly aroused, Il Profumo dell'invisibile (1986, Butterscotch), introducing the heroine Miele (Honey) and a sweet-smelling body-paint which makes the wearer invisible, and Candid camera (1988, Hidden Camera) featuring the same protagonist in further explicit adventures. In the following years of combining sequels, original work and collaborations with noted creators, Manara's production continued in this direction to explore erotic comics themes with an artistic and storytelling expression in a manner considered unique to Manara.

In the U.S. The Ape was serialised in Heavy Metal in the early 1980s and Manara received some exposure through collaborations with Neil Gaiman and other artists.

In connection with their joint project Quarantasei, in July 2006, Manara designed a helmet for Moto GP rider Valentino Rossi, specifically made for the Italian GP in Mugello.

Rossi declared: "He has drawn some kind of a mythical history of my life, in cartoons, with some of my heroes such as Steve McQueen, Enzo Ferrari, Jim Morrison, and other characters such as my dog Guido, the chicken Osvaldo and a lot of beautiful women! I really like Milo...he's a person that I have admired for a long time. "

In 2003, Manara's work featured on the cover of Scottish rock band Biffy Clyro's second studio album "The Vertigo of Bliss". Manara also created the artwork for all the singles released from this album.

In October 2006, Manara developed character designs for the animated television series City Hunters. The series, of ten 11 minute episodes, blends traditional animation techniques with modern CGI, to be broadcast across all of Latin America on the FOX network throughout 2006 and 2007.

Manara penciled an X-Men project written by Chris Claremont for Marvel Comics. X-Men: Ragazze in fuga was released in April 2009 in Italy this was later reprinted by Marvel Comics in English as XMen:women.

In 2013 he started to do variant covers for issues of Marvel comic books.
Milo Manara art
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Maroc biography

Maroc biography

Maroc (Robert Coram)
"Maroc" was the pen name of Robert Coram who contributed to London Opinion, Answers, Blighty, Inky Way Annual, Weekend Mail, Passing Shows, Sunday Chronicle, Daily Dispatch, Children's Own Favourite, Men Only, Strand, Sunday Telegraph and Razzle - especially the 4-6-page Reggie series.

In the 1960s he also drew Sportrait pocket cartoons for the Evening Standard. Coram's comic strips included Prairie Pete and Pronto, Ann Howe, Bob and Tanner, Wibble and Wobble and his pocket cartoon series included Wartime Humour and To-Day's Smile.
Maroc art
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Esteban Maroto biography

Esteban Maroto biography

Esteban Maroto (born 1942; Madrid, Spain)
Esteban Maroto is a Spanish comic book artist. Born in Madrid, he began his career in the 1960s with series like Cinco por infinito, published in English by Continuity Comics as "Zero Patrol" (heavily retouched by editor Neal Adams).

'Wolff' by Maroto was published in the UK by New English Library in the magazine Dracula. Dracula was published in the US by the Warren Publishing Company under the title Dracula Book 1 in 1972; the cover was by Esteban Maroto.

In the 1970s he started to be known in his own country when the magazine Trinca published Alma de Dragón. He designed the "metal bikini" for the character Red Sonja, in Savage Tales #3, Comixscene #5, and in the first issue of The Savage Sword of Conan and pencilled her first solo story, which was inked by Neal Adams and Ernie Chan. He also redesigned Satana for Marvel Comics and drew her second solo story in Vampire Tales #3. In issue 4 of the same series he drew an outstanding adaptation of the short story "The Drifting Snow" by August Derleth.

Maroto joined Warren Publishing in November 1971 when artists from the Spanish agency Selleciones Illustrada started appearing in the their three horror magazines, Creepy, Eerie and Vampirella. Maroto's first story, "Wolfhunt", appeared in Vampirella #14. Maroto quickly became one of the most well known and critically acclaimed Spanish artists at Warren. He would eventually draw 101 stories for them, more than any other artist except Jose Ortiz. Maroto won the Warren Award for best artist/writer in 1972, and his story "A Scream in the Forest" won the best art in a story award in 1973. Maroto remained with Warren until its folding in 1983.

Two Maroto's series were reprinted in Eerie and Vampirella. Manly, renamed Dax the Warrior, was reprinted in issues 39-41, 43-50 and 52 of Eerie. All of issue 59 was dedicated to Dax, which reprinted again the majority of these stories. His series Tomb of the Gods was reprinted in Vampirella issues 17 through 22.

He also contributed black and white illustrations for the Roger Zelazny book Changeling and Larry Niven's The Magic Goes Away.

He later worked on the series Amethyst, Zatanna, Atlantis Chronicles, The Savage Sword of Conan, Cadillacs and Dinosaurs, Dracula: Vlad the Impaler and X-Men Unlimited. In Italy, he worked for Sergio Bonelli Editore's series Brendon.
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William Francis Marshall biography

William Francis Marshall biography

(William) Francis Marshall (1901 - 1980)
Francis Marshall studied at Slade before entering the world of advertising illustration. In 1928 he began a 10-year relationship with Condé Nast, drawing for Vogue. In 1959 he wrote a successful book on drawing entitled Magazine Illustration.
William Francis Marshall art
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Tony Masero biography

Tony Masero biography

Tony Masero
Tony Masero has been an established illustrator for many years. He studied Graphics in London in the sixties and worked as a Graphic Designer before taking up illustration full time.

During his career he has completed numerous illustration commissions for clients across the world, in both publishing and advertising.

Nowadays he still uses his Graphic Design skills and combines these with traditional painting and digital tecniques to create his cover artwork.

He combines his painting with creative writing and has had many novels published. Westerns and Thrillers are his main output, dfor which he also creates his own cover art.

Tony is well known as a Dr Who and Western cover artist, including covers for several Target novelisations.

He lives with his wife Diana in the UK and Portugal.
Source: http://www.artnillustration.com/index.html and Illustration Art Gallery
Tony Masero art
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Fortunino Matania biography

Fortunino Matania biography

Fortunato Fortunino Matania (16 April 1881 - 8 February 1963; Italy and UK)
Born in Naples in 1881, Fortunino Matania trained at his father's studio and illustrated his first book at the age of 14. He studied in Paris, Milan and London, where he worked on The Graphic. He returned to Italy at the age of 22 for military service in the Bersaglieri. He then returned to London where he joined the staff of The Sphere.

With the outbreak of World War I he became a war artist and spent nearly five years at the front drawing hundreds of sketches. His work was admired by military experts and critics alike for his technical accomplishment and scrupulous accuracy. His war art features in virtually every history or encyclopaedia of WW1 ever produced.

At the end of World War I Matania illustrated numerous ceremonies in London, including the coronation of Edward VII. During the first half of the 20th century he literally illustrated history as it happened. He was made a Chevalier of the Crown of Italy, and exhibited regularly at the Royal Academy and The Royal Institute of Art.

In his studio he maintained an enormous collection of artefacts to aid him in his work. He rarely made preliminary sketches, preferring to begin an elaborate illustration without previous preparation. It was as if he had a exact mental photograph of the art before he began to paint or draw. His reputation was such that he was visited in his studio in London by Annigoni, Russell Flint, and John Singer Sargent, and his work is collected and admired by many of today's greatest artists and illustrators.

He was an expert at historical scenes from all periods of history and his Ancient Roman and classical illustrations are particularly admired and collected. During WW2, many of his paintings and drawings were destroyed when his studio was bombed in the Blitz. He was so prolific, however, that many examples of his art still survive.

His pictures were published every week in Illustrazione Italiana from 1895 - 1902, in The Graphic from 1901 - 1904, and in The Sphere from 1904 to 1963. He also contributed regularly to Britannia & Eve, and The Passing Show, where his Edgar Rice Burroughs illustrations appeared amongst others. His work has been used in numerous magazines and books such as Look & Learn, London Life and many others.
Fortunino Matania art

See BOOKS featuring Fortunino Matania
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Lorenzo Mattotti biography

Lorenzo Mattotti biography

Lorenzo Mattotti (born 24 January 1954; Brescia, Italy)
Lorenzo Mattotti is an Italian comics and graphical artist as well as an illustrator. His illustrations have been published in magazines such as Cosmopolitan, Vogue, The New Yorker, Le Monde and Vanity Fair. In comics, Mattotti won an Eisner Award in 2003 for his Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde graphic novel.

Mattotti was born in Brescia (Lombardy).

He studied architecture when he was young, but did not finish the course. Instead he became a comics artist. After a few traditional comic stories he decided he wanted to tell different kinds of stories and portray these in a different style.

Il Signor Spartaco was the first comic made under this ambition. The story centred around the dreams of a train passenger making it possible for Mattotti to use forms and colors in a way previously unseen in the classic French-Belgian comic world. He focused more on the inner world of his characters en the total absence of an adventure was also a radical change in the comics universe.

Mattotti is mainly inspired by painters, musicians, writers and directors. To him, the relation between text and image should be the same as with text and music. The two should enrich each other. Unusually, in Mattotti's comics the text illustrates the illustration instead of the other way around. He always makes sure the text has enough freedom for multiple interpretations.

With Fires (1986) Mattotti made his name in the comics world. The story revolves around the struggle between nature and civilization. The main character is a crew member of a pantser ship who has to make sure a mysterious island is ready for civilization. Dreams and associations again play an important role. Although Fires has a clear story line, Mattotti evades an explicit, chronological story. The inner battle of the main character to change and get out of his strict environment is more important. Graphically the album is a highlight in his artistic career: he worked six years on the book, which resembles a gallery of paintings.

After "Fires" Mattotti earned a reputation of being a master of color in comics. Therefore, the black and white comic "The Man at the Window" (1992) surprised his public. Together with his ex-wife Lilia Ambrosi he made this comic about a man who searches his way in the world and who has troubles with relationships. This semi-autobiographical novel is an intense and sensitive comic in which he uses different outings for pen drawings. He uses lines who as a text tell a story. The story is not so important and completely up to the reader to interpret.

In Caboto (1992), a comic book he drew as a commission from the Spanish government to commemorate the 500th birthday of Christopher Columbus' discovery of America, he tells the adventures of the explorer Sebastian Cabot. The story is poetic in tone and revolves around the fears and dreams of the people involved, including the women aboard the explorers' ship and the impressions the Indians might have had when first viewing the ships. Inspired by 16th century mannerism, he used a different style.

Stigmates (1998) was a new black and white comic with linear drawings, but darker and more nervous than The Man In The Window. It tells the tragic life of a drunk who wakes up one day with stigmata.
Source: Wikipedia
Lorenzo Mattotti art
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F Stocks May biography

F Stocks May biography

F Stocks May (flourished 1950s)
Illustrated many older children's books during the 1950s including 'The Boys Book Of Heroes' and 'Heroes Through the Ages'.

Illustrated the serialisation of the Lone Pine book 'Seven White Gates' in the comic Mickey Mouse Weekly between December 1953 and March 1954.
F Stocks May art
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Angus McBride biography

Angus McBride biography

Angus McBride (1931 - 2007)
Angus McBride is one of the world's most respected historical and fantasy illustrators, and contributed to numerous books, magazines and articles, including the classic Look & Learn, JRR Tolkein's Lord of the Rings, and more than 70 Osprey titles in the past three decades. Born in 1931 of Highland parents, but orphaned as a child, he was educated at Canterbury Cathedral Choir School. He worked in advertising agencies from 1947, and after National Service, emigrated to South Africa where he lived for several years, before relocating to Ireland before his sad demise in 2007.
Angus McBride art
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James E McConnell biography

James E McConnell biography

James E. McConnell (1903 - 1995)
Well known as a paperback and book jacket artist, particularly for Westerns, James McConnell never turned his hand to picture strips. Leonard Matthews, seeing his paperback work on display in a bookshop, soon had him working as a cover artist for Amalgamated Press, doing the majority of covers for the all text Western Library, a great many of the Cowboy Comics Library covers and a fair number of covers for Thriller Comics Library.

His robust, action-packed style is instantly recognisable. He always seemed more at home with cowboys rather than historical swashbucklers, his covers for the Western Library being of a particular high standard. Nonetheless, some of his historical covers for Thriller Comics Library are very satisfying for he is a great professional and can turn his hand to any genre. McConnell was an incredibly prolific artist, frequently completing a cover painting and the rough for another painting in the same day.
James E McConnell art

See illustrators issue 11 for a James McConnell feature article.
McConnell is a first class water-colourist and his colour technique has often been compared with - and even, on occasion, confused with - that of Reginald Heade. See for yourself!
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Harold McCready biography

Harold McCready biography

Harold McCready (22 February 1897 - 1972; Salford, Manchester, UK)
He was born in Salford, Manchester, the son of Samuel and Eliza McCready, on 22 February 1897. His father was born in Ireland but came to Lancashire with his family where he worked as an elementary school teacher in Broughton, marrying Eliza McCance in Salford in 1894. Harold was raised in Broughton and began working as a colliery labourer in Chesterfield at the age of 14. He served in the Notts & Derby Regiment and became a 2nd Lieutenant in the Warwick Regiment during the Great War.

McCready married Lily Moss in Leeds, Yorkshire, in 1918 and had a son, Desmond Roy McCready who was born in London in 1924. Released from war service in around 1919, he subsequently became an animator, working on the 'Bonzo' series of cartoons for New Era Films in 1924-26. At that time he was living at 133 Goldhawk Road, Hammersmith, moving after his marriage to 126 Goldhawk Road. The marriage may not have lasted as he app